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Pregnancy & Baby

  • Bonding With Your Baby

    Bonding, the intense attachment that develops between you and your baby, is completely natural. And it's probably one of the most pleasurable aspects of infant care.

  • Communication and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old

    Your toddler is probably saying a few first words now, but you may not be able to understand them all. Learn about how your child is communicating.

  • Communication and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    Your baby is learning to communicate through facial expressions like smiling or frowning as well as crying, squealing, babbling, and laughing. And those sounds are early attempts to speak!

  • Communication and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old

    Communicating with a child is one of the most pleasurable and rewarding experiences for both parent and child. Learn how to connect with your 2- to 3-year-old.

  • Communication and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    Your baby's range of sounds and facial expressions continues to grow, and your baby is also imitating sounds, which are the first attempts at speaking.

  • Communication and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old

    Babies this age might be about to say their first words, and communicate using body language. Read more about communicating with your baby.

  • Communication and Your Newborn

    From birth, your newborn has been communicating with you. Crying may seem like a foreign language, but soon you'll know what your baby needs - a diaper change, a feeding, or your touch.

  • Does My Toddler Have a Language Delay?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Reading Books to Babies

    Reading aloud to your baby stimulates developing senses, and builds listening and memory skills that can help your baby grow up to be a reader.

  • Separation Anxiety

    Teary and tantrum-filled goodbyes are common with separation anxiety, which is a perfectly normal part of childhood development.

  • Bonding With Your Baby

    Bonding, the intense attachment that develops between you and your baby, is completely natural. And it's probably one of the most pleasurable aspects of infant care.

  • Choosing Safe Baby Products: Toys

    All toys you select for your baby or toddler should meet safety standards. These tips can help you find safe toys for your little one.

  • Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old

    Kids go from babies to toddlers during this time, from first steps to walking well. They also make major strides in language and communication.

  • Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    After learning to recognize your voice, your face, and your touch, your baby will start responding more to you during these months and even give you a smile!

  • Learning, Play, and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    Your infant will learn to sit during this time, and in the next few months will begin exploring by reaching out for objects, grasping and inspecting them.

  • Learning, Play, and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old

    Your baby is learning more about the world through play and is beginning to use words. Keep those toys and games coming!

  • Learning, Play, and Your Newborn

    Play is the primary way that infants learn how to move, communicate, socialize, and understand their surroundings. And during the first month of life, your baby will learn by interacting with you.

  • Reading Books to Babies

    Reading aloud to your baby stimulates developing senses, and builds listening and memory skills that can help your baby grow up to be a reader.

  • Apnea of Prematurity

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is a condition in which premature infants stop breathing for 15 to 20 seconds during sleep. AOP usually goes away on its own as a baby matures.

  • Birth Defects

    Some birth defects are minor and cause no problems. Others can be serious and require lifelong treatment.

  • Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services

    Where you choose to give birth is an important decision. Is a hospital or a birth center right for you? Knowing the facts can help you make your decision.

  • Cesarean Sections (C-Sections)

    Many babies are delivered via cesarean sections. Learn why and how C-sections are done.

  • Choosing a Pediatrician for Your New Baby

    Along with considering baby names and buying a crib, choosing the right health care provider should be on your to-do list when you're expecting.

  • Common Questions About Immunizations

    Immunizations have protected millions of children from potentially deadly diseases. Learn about immunizations and find out exactly what they do - and what they don't.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): How to Protect Babies and Toddlers

    Children must be over age 2 to wear a face covering or mask. So parents might wonder how they can help protect their babies and toddlers from coronavirus (COVID-19).

  • Erythema Toxicum

    Erythema toxicum is a common rash seen in full-term newborns. No treatment is needed and it goes away on its own.

  • Fetal Lung Mass

    A fetal lung mass is an unusual lump that grows inside or next to an unborn baby’s lung. Some are treated before birth, while others are removed after the baby is born.

  • Gastroschisis

    Gastroschisis is when a baby is born with the intestines, and sometimes other organs, sticking out through a hole in the belly wall near the umbilical cord.

  • Health Screening Tests

    Health screening tests are routine tests that check for problems before signs show up. When problems are found early, the care is often simpler and may work better.

  • Hernias

    Hernias are fairly common in kids, and hernia repair is one of the most common pediatric surgeries.

  • How Can I Comfort My Baby During Shots?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • How Vaccines Help (Video)

    Vaccines help keep kids healthy, but many parents still have questions about them. Get answers here.

  • I'm Pregnant. How Can I Avoid Having My Baby Early?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • If Your Baby Has a Birth Defect

    If your child has a birth defect, you don't have to go it alone - many people and resources are available to help you.

  • Immunization Schedule

    Which vaccines does your child need and when? Use this immunization schedule as a handy reference.

  • Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Newborns

    An intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is bleeding in and around the brain’s ventricles. Most babies with a mild IVH do well.

  • Jaundice in Newborns

    Jaundice is when a baby has yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes. Most types of jaundice go away on their own.

  • Meconium Aspiration Syndrome (MAS)

    Meconium aspiration can happen before, during, or after labor and delivery when a newborn inhales a mixture of meconium and amniotic fluid. Although it can be serious, most cases are not.

  • Medical Care and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old

    The toddler months might continue to bring colds, bruises, and other minor emergencies, but you'll also find yourself dealing with your toddler's emerging independence.

  • Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    You probably have lots of questions about your baby's health. When should you call the doctor, and what medical care should you expect for your baby at this age?

  • Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    Because your baby begins to show his or her personality during these months, your questions may move from simple sleeping and eating concerns to those about physical and social development.

  • Medical Care and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old

    As your baby becomes more independent, you may have questions about how to prevent bumps and bruises. Here are some other topics you'll cover with your doctor.

  • Medical Care and Your Newborn

    By the time you hold your new baby for the first time, you've probably chosen your little one's doctor. Learn about your newborn's medical care.

  • Medical Care During Pregnancy

    The sooner in pregnancy good care begins, the better for the health of both moms and their babies. Here's what to expect.

  • Miscarriages

    Miscarriages are common, and in most cases aren't preventable. But you can take steps to increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy.

  • Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is an intestinal disease that usually affects preemies. Medicines and therapy can help babies with NEC.

  • Newborn Screening Tests

    Newborn screening tests look for health conditions that aren't apparent at birth. Find out which tests are done.

  • Omphalocele

    A baby born with an omphalocele has an opening where the umbilical cord goes into the belly. Some openings close on their own, but many need treatment, including surgery.

  • Postpartum Depression

    It's important for new mothers – and those who love them – to understand the symptoms of postpartum depression and reach out to family, friends, and medical professionals for help.

  • Prenatal Test: Multiple Marker Test

    The multiple marker test is a blood test done to screen for neural tube defects and chromosomal disorders.

  • Prenatal Test: Ultrasound

    A prenatal ultrasound is a safe and painless test that shows a baby's shape and position. It can be done in the first, second, or third trimester of pregnancy.

  • Prenatal Tests: FAQs

    Every parent-to-be hopes for a healthy baby, but it can be hard not to worry. Find out what tests can keep you informed of your health — and your baby's — throughout pregnancy.

  • Prenatal Tests: Second Trimester

    Find out what tests may be offered to you during weeks 13 through 26 of pregnancy.

  • Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor

    When kids know they're "going to the doctor," many become worried about the visit. Here's how to help them.

  • Pyloric Stenosis

    Pyloric stenosis can make a baby vomit forcefully and often. It can lead to serious problems like dehydration, and needs medical treatment right away.

  • Questions to Ask When Your Baby's in the NICU

    Having a newborn in the NICU can be a stressful time. Often, parents forget to ask important questions. This list can help you prepare for the next time you talk to your baby's care team.

  • Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Sometimes when babies are born premature, they have trouble breathing. This can be caused by respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Learn what RDS is, and how babies can be helped.

  • Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP)

    Retinopathy of prematurity, which can happen in premature babies, causes abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina. Some children will need surgery to prevent vision loss or blindness.

  • Rh Incompatibility During Pregnancy

    If you just found out you're pregnant, one of the first tests you should expect is a blood-type test. This basic test determines your blood type and Rh factor, which may play an important role in your baby's health.

  • Taking Your Preemie Home

    If you're about to begin caring for your preemie at home, try to relax. With some preparation and planning, you'll be ready.

  • Talking to Your Child's Doctor

    Building a relationship with your child's doctor requires communication and reasonable expectations.

  • Undescended Testicles

    Shortly before birth, a boy's testicles usually descend into the scrotum. When a testicle doesn't make the move, this is called cryptorchidism, or undescended testicles.

  • Why Do Newborns Need a Vitamin K Shot?

    Why do newborns need a dose of vitamin K at birth? Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 1 Month

    Find out what this doctor's visit will involve and what your baby might be doing by the first month.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 1 Year (12 Months)

    Find out what this doctor's visit will involve and what your baby might be doing by the first birthday.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 1.5 Years (18 Months)

    Find out what this doctor's visit will involve and what your toddler might be doing by 18 months.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 15 Months

    Find out what this doctor's visit will involve and what your toddler might be doing by 15 months.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 2 Months

    Find out what this doctor's visit will involve and what your baby might be doing by the second month.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 2 Years (24 Months)

    Find out what this doctor's visit will involve and what your child might be doing by the second year.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 3 to 5 Days

    Find out what this doctor's checkup will involve a few days after your baby is born.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 4 Months

    Find out what this doctor's visit will involve and what your baby might be doing by the fourth month.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 6 Months

    Find out what this doctor's visit will involve and what your baby might be doing by 6 months.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 9 Months

    Find out what this doctor's visit will involve and what your baby might be doing by 9 months old.

  • Your Child's Checkup: Newborn

    Find out what this doctor's checkup will involve after your baby arrives.

  • Your Child's Immunizations

    Immunizations protect kids from many dangerous diseases. Find out what vaccines your child needs to grow up healthy.

  • Bed-Sharing

    Bed-sharing increases the risk of sleep-related deaths, including SIDS. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends room-sharing without bed-sharing for the safest sleep environment.

  • Breastfeeding FAQs: Sleep - Yours and Your Baby's

    Here are answers to some common questions about breastfed babies and sleep - from where they should snooze to when they'll finally start sleeping through the night.

  • Flat Head Syndrome (Positional Plagiocephaly)

    Babies can develop a flat spot on the back of their heads, usually from sleeping in the same position too long. Alternating your baby's sleep position and providing lots of "tummy time" can help.

  • Helping Your Baby Sleep (Video)

    All new parents want their babies to sleep well. Here's what to expect in that first year, and how to help your baby sleep.

  • How Can I Be Sure My Baby Stays on Her Back While She Sleeps?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Naps

    A good nap can keep kids from becoming overtired, which not only takes a toll on their moods but might make it harder for them to fall asleep at night.

  • Safe Sleep for Babies (Video)

    Guard against sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) by learning how to safely put your baby to sleep.

  • Sleep and Your 1- to 2-Year-Old

    Nighttime feedings may be a thing of the past, but in this second year of life your tot might be rising for other reasons. Learn more.

  • Sleep and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    At this age, babies generally have their days and nights straightened out. Many infants even "sleep through the night," which means 5 or 6 hours at a time.

  • Sleep and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    By this age, your baby should be on the way to having a regular sleep pattern, sleeping longer at night, and taking 2 or 3 naps during the day.

  • Sleep and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old

    Sleep problems are common in the second half of a baby's first year. It's best to respond to your baby's needs with the right balance of concern and consistency.

  • Sleep and Your Newborn

    Newborn babies don’t yet have a sense of day and night. They wake often to eat – no matter what time it is.

  • Sleep and Your School-Aged Child

    School-age kids need 9–12 hours of sleep a night. If they don't get it, they may be cranky or moody, hyper, and have behavior problems.

  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

    SIDS is the leading cause of death among infants 1 month to 1 year old. Though SIDS remains unpredictable, you can help reduce your infant's risk.

What next?

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And we have many more pediatric primary care providers in Northeast Ohio. You can meet some of them here.
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Need help finding a doctor, choosing a location or getting a general question about Akron Children's answered? Call us or fill out the form and we'll help in any way we can.
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With virtual visits, you can see our pediatric experts from the comfort of home or wherever you are.
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We offer many ways to get pediatric care all over Northeast Ohio. Use this page to find the right kind of care and the most convenient location for you.