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Infections

  • A to Z: Cat Scratch Disease

    Cat scratch disease is an infection caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. It comes from a scratch or bite of an infected cat, usually a kitten.

  • A to Z: Otitis Media (Ear Infection)

    Learn more about otitis media, an infection of the middle ear.

  • A to Z: Yeast Infection

    See: Candidiasis.

  • Adenovirus

    Adenoviruses can infect the lining of the eyes, airways and lungs, intestines, urinary tract, and nervous system. They're common causes of fever, coughs, sore throats, diarrhea, and pinkeye.

  • Bronchiolitis

    Bronchiolitis is a common illness of the respiratory tract caused by an infection that affects tiny airways. The best treatment for most kids with bronchiolitis is time to recover and plenty of fluids.

  • Bronchitis

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the lining of the bronchial tubes. When a person has bronchitis, it may be harder for air to pass in and out of the lungs.

  • Campylobacter Infections

    These bacterial infections can cause diarrhea, cramping, abdominal pain, and fever. Good hand-washing and food safety habits can help prevent them.

  • Can Kids Get a COVID-19 Vaccine Along With the Flu Vaccine?

    It's safe for kids to get a COVID-19 vaccine along with any other routine vaccine, including the flu vaccine.

  • Cat Scratch Disease

    Cat scratch disease is an infection that causes swelling of the lymph nodes after a cat scratch or bite. Learn about signs and symptoms, prevention, treatment, and more.

  • Cellulitis

    Cellulitis is an infection of the skin and underlying tissues that can affect any area of the body. It begins in an area of broken skin, like a cut or scratch.

  • Chickenpox

    Chickenpox used to be common in kids, causing a very itchy red rash all over the body. But the good news is that a vaccine can prevent most cases.

  • Chlamydia

    Chlamydia is an STD caused by bacteria. It's important to know the symptoms, as treatment can prevent the infection from leading to other health problems.

  • Cold Sores

    Cold sores are small and painful blisters that appear around the mouth, face, or nose. They're very common and, while uncomfortable, usually go away on their own.

  • Colds

    Colds are the most common infectious disease in the United States - and the top reason kids visit the doctor and miss school.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    The coronavirus (COVID-19) is making people sick with flu-like symptoms. Read this article to learn how to protect your family, and to know when to call your doctor.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19) and Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C)

    Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) causes inflammation throughout the body. Doctors are trying to find out how these symptoms are related to coronavirus (COVID-19) infection.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19) Tests: Which One Is Best?

    Two kinds of tests can see if someone is infected with coronavirus: molecular tests (such as PCR) and antigen tests. Find out how they differ and which might be best for you or your family.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Antibody Testing

    Antibody testing for coronavirus (COVID-19) involves taking a small blood sample to check for antibodies that the body may have made to fight the virus.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Being Ready to Quarantine

    People who have a coronavirus (COVID-19) infection or are around someone who has it should stay home to prevent spreading the virus. Here's how to prepare to quarantine or isolate at home.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Booster Shots

    The immune protection from the COVID-19 vaccine can fade over time. A booster shot is now recommended for everyone age 12 and older. Here's why.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Enjoying Holidays, Celebrations, and Gatherings Safely

    Events and holidays are different as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. Here are some ways to enjoy them safely.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Getting Tested

    As coronavirus spreads in communities, parents might wonder if their family should get tested. Here's how health care providers test for it.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Home Care & Precautions

    Anyone who is sick — even if they don't know for sure they have coronavirus (COVID-19) — should stay home unless they need medical care. This helps prevent the illness from spreading to others.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): How to Isolate at Home

    Someone with a positive coronavirus test is infected and is contagious. They will need to stay home to prevent the virus from spreading to others. Here's how to isolate at home.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): How to Protect Babies and Toddlers

    Here's how parents can help protect their babies and toddlers from coronavirus (COVID-19).

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): How to Talk to Your Child

    Your kids are hearing about coronavirus (COVID-19). To make sure they get reliable information, here's how to talk about it.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): How Wearing a Mask Helps Protect Against Infection

    Wearing masks or cloth face coverings in public is an important way to help slow the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): How YOU Can Stop the Spread (Video)

    Why is social distancing important? Find out how to keep yourself and other people healthy.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Kids & Medical Care During the Pandemic

    The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has put many doctor visits on hold. But kids should see their doctors for well-child visits and other care. Here's what parents should know.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Kids and Masks

    Wearing masks helps to slow the spread of COVID-19. Some toddlers and young children may feel uneasy about masks. Here's how to reassure your child.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Pregnancy FAQs

    We're learning more every day about coronavirus (COVID-19). Here are some answers to questions about coronavirus and pregnancy.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Questions & Answers About Vaccines

    As COVID-19 vaccines become available, here are some questions many parents have.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Social Distancing With Children

    We're still finding out about COVID-19, but we know a lot. One thing we've learned is that social distancing is an important way to help prevent the virus from spreading.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Sports & Activities

    As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, it’s important to know how to protect active kids and young athletes.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Staying Safe in School During the Pandemic

    Experts recommend that kids go back to in-person school this year, as long as safety measures are followed.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Understanding the COVID-19 Vaccine

    Getting vaccinated against COVID-19 is the best way to prevent the spread of the virus and protect families from serious illness. Watch this video to learn about how the vaccines work.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Viral Testing

    People might want to get tested for coronavirus for different reasons. Here is what viral testing involves.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): What Are Variants?

    As the COVID-19 pandemic goes on, we’re hearing about “variants” of the virus that are different from the original one that started the pandemic. But what is a variant?

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): What Do Quarantine and Isolation Mean?

    Some people with COVID-19 might need to stay home and away from others for a set time. This is known as isolation or quarantine. Find out what this means.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): What to Do if Your Child Is Sick

    There's still much to learn about COVID-19. Still, parents wonder what to do if their child gets sick during the pandemic. Here's what doctors say to do if your child has coronavirus symptoms.

  • COVID-19 Vaccines for Children Ages 6 Months to 5 Years

    Children 6 months old to 5 years old now can get vaccinated against COVID-19. Here's what parents should know.

  • Coxsackievirus Infections

    Coxsackievirus infections can spread from person to person. In most cases, the viruses cause mild flu-like symptoms, but can lead to more serious infections.

  • Croup

    Croup often causes kids to have a loud cough that sounds like a seal barking. Most cases of croup are caused by viruses, are mild, and can be treated at home.

  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV)

    This virus poses few risks to healthy kids, but can cause serious health problems in unborn babies and kids with a weak immune system.

  • Dengue Fever

    You're not at risk of this illness in the U.S., but if you live in or are traveling to a tropical country it's wise to take precautions against this virus.

  • Diphtheria

    Diphtheria is a bacterial infection that's rare in the United States, where health officials immunize kids against it. But it's still common in developing countries where immunizations aren't given routinely.

  • E. Coli Infections: Diarrhea

    Undercooked burgers and unwashed produce are among the foods that can harbor E. coli bacteria and lead to infection marked by severe diarrhea. Here's how to protect your family.

  • Ebola

    When people with Ebola are correctly diagnosed, isolated, and cared for, the risk of passing the disease to others is low.

  • Encephalitis

    Encephalitis is a rare brain inflammation caused by a virus. The best way to avoid encephalitis is to prevent the illnesses that may lead to it.

  • Enterovirus Infections

    Enteroviruses are a common cause of infection in people of all ages, with symptoms that can range from mild to serious.

  • Fevers

    Fevers happen when the body's internal "thermostat" raises the body temperature above normal. This is often the body's way of fighting infections.

  • Fifth Disease

    Especially common in kids between the ages of 5 and 15, fifth disease is a viral illness that produces a distinctive red rash on the face, body, arms, and legs.

  • Fighting Germs

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa can cause disease. Here's how to help protect your family from germs.

  • First Aid: Chickenpox

    Chickenpox (varicella) has become less common in the U.S. due to the chickenpox vaccine, but it can easily spread from one person to another.

  • Food Poisoning

    Sometimes, germs can get into food and cause food poisoning. Find out what to do if your child gets food poisoning - and how to prevent it.

  • Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    Gastroenteritis is an infection that causes nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and belly cramps. It's often called the stomach flu, and is a common illness.

  • Genital Herpes

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that's usually caused by the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2).

  • Genital Warts (HPV)

    Genital warts usually are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), which also can lead to cervical cancer and other types of cancer. A vaccine can prevent HPV infection.

  • Gonorrhea

    Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Many people with gonorrhea have no symptoms. They can spread the infection to others without knowing it.

  • Group B Strep and Pregnancy

    Women who have this common but potentially dangerous bacteria while pregnant get antibiotics during labor to avoid passing the bacteria to their babies.

  • Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFM) is a common viral infection that causes painful red blisters in the mouth and throat, and on the hands, feet, and diaper area.

  • Helicobacter pylori

    H. pylori bacteria can cause digestive illnesses, including gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.

  • Hepatitis

    Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. Most cases are caused by a virus — either hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C — all of which can be passed to others by someone who is infected.

  • Hepatitis A

    Hepatitis A is a contagious liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The hepatitis A vaccine has helped to make the infection rare in the United States.

  • Hepatitis B

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) spreads from person to person through blood or other body fluids. A vaccine is approved for people of all ages to prevent HBV infection.

  • Hepatitis C

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through blood or other body fluids, and can lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer. The most common way people become infected is by sharing drug paraphernalia.

  • Hib Disease (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b)

    Hib disease can cause serious illnesses like meningitis and pneumonia. To protect kids from this bacterial infection, they should receive the Hib vaccine as infants.

  • HIV and AIDS

    Parents can help prevent HIV/AIDS by learning the facts and talking with their kids regularly about healthy behaviors, feelings, and sexuality.

  • How to Take Your Child's Temperature

    All kids get a fever from time to time. Here's how to take your child's temperature, safely and accurately.

  • Impetigo

    Impetigo is a contagious skin infection that causes blisters or sores on the face, neck, hands, and diaper area. Learn how this common problem is treated and what can help prevent it.

  • Infant Botulism

    Infant botulism can happen if a baby ingests bacteria that make toxins inside the body. Treatment can help a baby who gets it recover fully.

  • Infections That Pets Can Spread

    Kids can benefit from the companionship, affection, and relationships they share with pets. But it's important to know how to protect your family from infections carried by pets and other animals.

  • Inflammation

    Inflammation is one way the body reacts to infection, injury, or other medical conditions. Many things can cause it.

  • Is It a Cold, the Flu, or COVID-19?

    The flu usually makes kids feel worse than if they have a cold. But it's not always easy to tell the difference. Here are tips on what to look for — and what to do.

  • Is it Safe to Breastfeed if I Have Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

    Moms who have coronavirus (COVID-19) can still breastfeed their babies or give expressed breast milk. Here's what to know.

  • Listeria Infections

    Listeriosis is a serious infection caused by eating contaminated food. It mostly affects pregnant women, newborns, and adults with weakened immune systems. Here's how to protect your family.

  • Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease can affect the skin, joints, nervous system, and other organ systems. If Lyme disease is diagnosed quickly and treated with antibiotics, most people feel better quickly.

  • Measles

    Measles is best known for the skin rash it causes. Although rare, outbreaks can happen. Getting your kids fully vaccinated is the best way to protect them from this disease.

  • Meningitis

    Meningitis is treatable, but can be serious. So it's important to know the symptoms, and get medical care right away if you think that your child has the illness.

  • Middle Ear Infections (Otitis Media)

    Ear infections are common among kids and, often, painful. Find out what causes them and how they're treated.

  • Monkeypox

    Cases of monkeypox have been reported in areas that don't usually see infections with the virus. Here’s what to know about monkeypox.

  • Mononucleosis (Mono)

    Mononucleosis - or "mono" - is an infection that causes flu-like symptoms. It usually goes away on its own in a few weeks with the help of plenty of fluids and rest.

  • Mosquito-Borne Diseases

    Mosquito-borne diseases are illnesses spread by the bite of an infected mosquito.

  • MRSA

    MRSA is a type of bacteria that the usual antibiotics can't tackle anymore. Simple precautions can help protect your kids from becoming infected.

  • Mumps

    Mumps is a viral infection that causes telltale swelling and pain in the salivary glands. With the help of the mumps vaccine, it's preventable.

  • Norovirus

    Norovirus is a virus that causes diarrhea and vomiting. Most norovirus infections get better on their own with home care.

  • Osteomyelitis

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection that can happen when germs enter an open wound. The easiest way to prevent it is to keep skin clean.

  • PANDAS and PANS

    PANDAS and PANS cause a sudden onset of severe OCD symptoms. They also cause other sudden changes in a child's behavior. These can be so extreme that a parent may say their child seemed to "change overnight."

  • Parechovirus

    Parechovirus infections usually cause no symptoms or only mild symptoms. But the virus can cause serious illness in babies and young children.

  • Peritonsillar Abscess

    Older kids and teens with tonsilitis sometimes develop this painful abscess, a pus-filled tissue at the back of the mouth.

  • Pinkeye (Conjunctivitis)

    Pinkeye, or conjunctivitis, is the most common eye infection affecting kids. Learn more about pinkeye and how to prevent it from spreading.

  • Polio

    Polio is a contagious disease that can be prevented with vaccination.

  • Powassan Virus Disease

    Powassan virus disease can spread to people through the bite of an infected tick. It’s very rare, but it’s good to know a little about it.

  • PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis)

    PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is when someone takes medicines every day to lower his or her chances of getting HIV.

  • Rabies

    Rabies is a serious infection of the nervous system that is caused by a virus. Rabies is usually transmitted by a bite from an infected animal.

  • Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions

    Recurrent urinary tract infections can cause kidney damage if left untreated, especially in kids under age 6. Here's how to recognize the symptom of UTIs and get help for your child.

  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory illness in young children. Learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of this contagious infection.

  • Retropharyngeal Abscess

    Retropharyngeal abscesses form behind the back wall of the throat, and are uncommon in children.

  • Reye Syndrome

    Reye syndrome is an extremely rare but serious illness. Cases have dropped greatly since the finding of a link between the illness and aspirin use in kids and teens.

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is an infection spread by ticks. Find out more about it - including how to prevent it.

  • Roseola

    Roseola is a viral illness that usually affects kids between 6 months and 3 years old. Learn its signs and symptoms when to call the doctor.

  • Rotavirus

    Rotavirus infection affects most kids and is one of the most common causes of diarrhea. A vaccine to prevent it is now recommended for all kids.

  • Rubella (German Measles)

    Rubella infection, or German measles, usually is a mild disease in kids that can be prevented with vaccination. Its primary medical danger is to pregnant women because it can affect developing babies.

  • Salmonella Infections

    Salmonellosis is a foodborne illness caused by the bacteria salmonella. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, fever, and headache.

  • Scarlet Fever

    Scarlet fever is an illness caused by a strep infection. It causes a red, bumpy rash that spreads over most of the body, and is treated with antibiotics.

  • Shigella Infections (Shigellosis)

    Shigella are bacteria that can infect the digestive tract and cause a wide range of symptoms, from diarrhea, cramping, vomiting, and nausea, to more serious complications and illnesses.

  • Shingles

    Shingles isn't very common in kids - it mostly affects older people. Find out what causes shingles, symptoms to watch for, and what to do if your child has it.

  • Sinusitis

    Sinus infections, or sinusitis, are common and easily treated.

  • Smallpox

    If you're wondering what smallpox is and why people sometimes worry about it, get the facts here.

  • Staph Infections

    When skin is punctured or broken for any reason, staph bacteria can enter the wound and cause an infection. But good hygiene can prevent many staph infections. Learn more.

  • Strep Throat

    Strep throat is a common cause of sore throat in kids and teens. It usually requires treatment with antibiotics, but improves in a few days.

  • Swimmer's Ear (Otitis Externa)

    Swimmer's ear is an infection of the ear canal caused by many types of bacteria or fungi. Find out how to prevent it.

  • Syphilis

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Early treatment can cure it and prevent long-term problems.

  • Talking to Your Kids About STDs

    Your kids need to understand how STDs spread and how to protect themselves. Here's how to talk to them about sexually transmitted diseases.

  • Tetanus

    Tetanus (also called lockjaw) is a preventable disease that affects the muscles and nerves, usually due to a contaminated wound.

  • The Danger of Antibiotic Overuse

    Taking antibiotics too often or for the wrong reason has led to a dangerous rise in bacteria that no longer respond to medicine. Find out what you can do to prevent antibiotic overuse.

  • The Flu (Influenza)

    Flu symptoms tend to come on quickly and are worse than the sneezing and stuffiness of a cold. The flu is very contagious. Find out what to do in this article for parents.

  • Tick Removal: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Boy, your child's freckles really stand out in the sun — yikes, that one is actually a tick! What should you do?

  • Tonsillitis

    Tonsillitis is an infection that makes tonsils swollen and red. It can cause a sore throat, fever, swollen glands, and trouble swallowing.

  • Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Toxic shock syndrome is a serious but uncommon bacterial infection. TSS is a medical emergency - symptoms include sudden high fever, a faint feeling, diarrhea, headache, and muscle aches.

  • Toxic Synovitis

    Read about this temporary inflammation of the hip joint that affects young children.

  • Tuberculosis

    Tuberculosis (TB) is making a comeback in the United States today. Find out who's at risk, what to watch for, and how doctors treat TB.

  • Understanding Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Looking for information about coronavirus (COVID-19)? Our articles and videos explain what the virus is, ways to prevent it from spreading, how to talk to kids about it, how to care for someone who is sick, and much more.

  • Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in kids. They're easy to treat and usually clear up in a week or so.

  • Warts

    Many of us have had a wart somewhere on our bodies at some time. But other than being a nuisance, most warts are harmless.

  • West Nile Virus

    The threat of West Nile virus has made getting a mosquito bite a cause for concern. What is West Nile virus, and what can you do to prevent it?

  • What Is Herd Immunity?

    Herd immunity is when many people are immune to a contagious infection, so it's harder for that infection to spread in a community. But does it have a role in the fight against COVID-19?

  • When and Where to Get Medical Care

    Should you head to the ER when your child is hurt or ill? What about an urgent care center? Different problems need different levels of care, and you have many options.

  • Whooping Cough (Pertussis)

    Pertussis is characterized by severe coughing spells that end in a whooping sound when the person breathes in. It can be prevented with the pertussis vaccine, part of the DTaP immunization.

  • Yersiniosis

    Yersiniosis is an uncommon infection caused by the consumption of undercooked meat products, unpasteurized milk, or water contaminated by the bacteria.

  • Zika Virus

    Zika is a virus that a person can catch if bitten by an infected mosquito. Outbreaks of the virus have happened throughout the world, particularly in tropical areas where certain types of mosquitoes live.

  • Bronchitis

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the lining of the bronchial tubes. When a person has bronchitis, it may be harder for air to pass in and out of the lungs.

  • Colds

    Colds are the most common infectious disease in the United States - and the top reason kids visit the doctor and miss school.

  • Coughing

    Coughs are a common symptom, but most aren't a sign of a serious condition. Learn about different coughs, how to help your child feel better, and when to call your doctor.

  • Does My Child Need an Antibiotic? (Video)

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that can help kids feel better -- but only when they have certain illnesses. Find out if an antibiotic is right for your child.

  • Enterovirus Infections

    Enteroviruses are a common cause of infection in people of all ages, with symptoms that can range from mild to serious.

  • How Many Doses of Flu Vaccine Does My Child Need?

    Knowing the doctor-recommended flu vaccination schedule can be confusing. Use this tool to help you understand how many doses your child needs.

  • How to Safely Give Acetaminophen

    What kind? How much? How often? Find out how to give this pain and fever medicine.

  • Is It a Cold, the Flu, or COVID-19?

    The flu usually makes kids feel worse than if they have a cold. But it's not always easy to tell the difference. Here are tips on what to look for — and what to do.

  • Is it Safe to Breastfeed if I Have the Flu?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Too Late for the Flu Vaccine?

    It's best to get the flu vaccine early in flu season, so the body can make antibodies that protect it from the flu. But getting it later is better than not getting it at all.

  • Who Should Get the Flu Vaccine?

    The flu vaccine is a good idea for all families. It does not cause the flu, and it helps keep kids and parents from getting sick.

  • A to Z: Otitis Media (Ear Infection)

    Learn more about otitis media, an infection of the middle ear.

  • Bronchitis

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the lining of the bronchial tubes. When a person has bronchitis, it may be harder for air to pass in and out of the lungs.

  • Chickenpox

    Chickenpox used to be common in kids, causing a very itchy red rash all over the body. But the good news is that a vaccine can prevent most cases.

  • Cold Sores

    Cold sores are small and painful blisters that appear around the mouth, face, or nose. They're very common and, while uncomfortable, usually go away on their own.

  • Colds

    Colds are the most common infectious disease in the United States - and the top reason kids visit the doctor and miss school.

  • Diarrhea

    Most kids battle diarrhea from time to time, so it's important to know what to do to relieve and even prevent it.

  • Enterovirus Infections

    Enteroviruses are a common cause of infection in people of all ages, with symptoms that can range from mild to serious.

  • Fevers

    Fevers happen when the body's internal "thermostat" raises the body temperature above normal. This is often the body's way of fighting infections.

  • Head Lice

    Lice aren't dangerous and they don't spread disease, but they are contagious, annoying, and sometimes hard to get rid of. Learn more about this common childhood problem and how to get rid of those pesky little bugs.

  • How to Take Your Child's Temperature

    All kids get a fever from time to time. Here's how to take your child's temperature, safely and accurately.

  • Is It a Cold, the Flu, or COVID-19?

    The flu usually makes kids feel worse than if they have a cold. But it's not always easy to tell the difference. Here are tips on what to look for — and what to do.

  • Middle Ear Infections (Otitis Media)

    Ear infections are common among kids and, often, painful. Find out what causes them and how they're treated.

  • Mononucleosis (Mono)

    Mononucleosis - or "mono" - is an infection that causes flu-like symptoms. It usually goes away on its own in a few weeks with the help of plenty of fluids and rest.

  • Pinkeye (Conjunctivitis)

    Pinkeye, or conjunctivitis, is the most common eye infection affecting kids. Learn more about pinkeye and how to prevent it from spreading.

  • Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in kids. They're easy to treat and usually clear up in a week or so.

  • Athlete's Foot

    Athlete's foot is a common fungal skin infection. It's generally easy to treat and prevent.

  • Diaper Rash

    Diaper rash is a very common infection that can cause a baby's skin to become sore, red, scaly, and tender. In most cases, it clears up with simple changes in diapering.

  • Fighting Germs

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa can cause disease. Here's how to help protect your family from germs.

  • Infections That Pets Can Spread

    Kids can benefit from the companionship, affection, and relationships they share with pets. But it's important to know how to protect your family from infections carried by pets and other animals.

  • Jock Itch

    Jock itch is a pretty common fungal infection of the groin and upper thighs. It is generally easy to treat and prevent.

  • Oral Thrush

    Oral thrush, a very common infection in infants that causes irritation in and around the baby's mouth, often goes away on its own without medical treatment.

  • Pityriasis Versicolor

    Pityriasis versicolor is a rash caused by a fungus. It can appear over the chest, shoulders, and back, and is a common cause of skin rashes in teens.

  • Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    Pneumocystis pneumonia can affect infants who have AIDS, cancer, or other conditions that affect the immune system.

  • Ringworm

    Ringworm is a type of fungal skin infection. The good news is that ringworm is easy to treat.

  • Vaginal Yeast Infections

    Vaginal yeast infections are common among growing girls, and can cause some pain and discomfort. They usually clear up quickly with proper medical treatment.

  • Vaginitis in Children

    Vaginitis is redness, soreness, or swelling in and around the vagina. It's common in girls of all ages, and usually can be treated at home.

  • Appendicitis

    Appendicitis requires immediate medical attention, so it's important to know its symptoms. The earlier it's caught, the easier it is to treat.

  • Ascariasis

    Ascariasis is an intestinal infection that occurs when the eggs of a parasitic roundworm are ingested. Read about signs and symptoms, treatment, and tips for prevention.

  • Campylobacter Infections

    These bacterial infections can cause diarrhea, cramping, abdominal pain, and fever. Good hand-washing and food safety habits can help prevent them.

  • Cholera

    While cholera isn't common in the U.S., it can be a health threat elsewhere. Learn about cholera and how to prevent it.

  • Dengue Fever

    You're not at risk of this illness in the U.S., but if you live in or are traveling to a tropical country it's wise to take precautions against this virus.

  • Diarrhea

    Most kids battle diarrhea from time to time, so it's important to know what to do to relieve and even prevent it.

  • Fighting Germs

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa can cause disease. Here's how to help protect your family from germs.

  • Food Poisoning

    Sometimes, germs can get into food and cause food poisoning. Find out what to do if your child gets food poisoning - and how to prevent it.

  • Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    Gastroenteritis is an infection that causes nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and belly cramps. It's often called the stomach flu, and is a common illness.

  • Giardiasis

    Giardiasis, one of the chief causes of diarrhea in the United States, is an intestinal illness caused by a microscopic parasite.

  • Helicobacter pylori

    H. pylori bacteria can cause digestive illnesses, including gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.

  • Norovirus

    Norovirus is a virus that causes diarrhea and vomiting. Most norovirus infections get better on their own with home care.

  • Pinworm Infections

    Pinworm is an intestinal infection caused by tiny parasitic worms. But pinworms don't cause any harm (just itching), and it won't take long to get rid of them.

  • Rotavirus

    Rotavirus infection affects most kids and is one of the most common causes of diarrhea. A vaccine to prevent it is now recommended for all kids.

  • Salmonella Infections

    Salmonellosis is a foodborne illness caused by the bacteria salmonella. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, fever, and headache.

  • Shigella Infections (Shigellosis)

    Shigella are bacteria that can infect the digestive tract and cause a wide range of symptoms, from diarrhea, cramping, vomiting, and nausea, to more serious complications and illnesses.

  • Stomachaches

    Kids can have stomach pain for lots of reasons - not all of them related to the digestive system. Here are some clues about what could be going on.

  • Tapeworm

    Tapeworms are usually more upsetting to think about than to deal with. Tapeworm infections are rare in the United States, and they're usually easy to treat.

  • Typhoid Fever

    While typhoid fever isn't common in the U.S., it can be a health threat elsewhere. Learn about this illness and how to prevent it.

  • Yersiniosis

    Yersiniosis is an uncommon infection caused by the consumption of undercooked meat products, unpasteurized milk, or water contaminated by the bacteria.

  • Adenovirus

    Adenoviruses can infect the lining of the eyes, airways and lungs, intestines, urinary tract, and nervous system. They're common causes of fever, coughs, sore throats, diarrhea, and pinkeye.

  • Bronchiolitis

    Bronchiolitis is a common illness of the respiratory tract caused by an infection that affects tiny airways. The best treatment for most kids with bronchiolitis is time to recover and plenty of fluids.

  • Bronchitis

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the lining of the bronchial tubes. When a person has bronchitis, it may be harder for air to pass in and out of the lungs.

  • Croup

    Croup often causes kids to have a loud cough that sounds like a seal barking. Most cases of croup are caused by viruses, are mild, and can be treated at home.

  • Diphtheria

    Diphtheria is a bacterial infection that's rare in the United States, where health officials immunize kids against it. But it's still common in developing countries where immunizations aren't given routinely.

  • Measles

    Measles is best known for the skin rash it causes. Although rare, outbreaks can happen. Getting your kids fully vaccinated is the best way to protect them from this disease.

  • Meningitis

    Meningitis is treatable, but can be serious. So it's important to know the symptoms, and get medical care right away if you think that your child has the illness.

  • Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    Pneumocystis pneumonia can affect infants who have AIDS, cancer, or other conditions that affect the immune system.

  • Pneumonia

    Pneumonia is a lung infection that can be caused by different types of germs, most commonly viruses. Read about symptoms and treatment.

  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory illness in young children. Learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of this contagious infection.

  • Scarlet Fever

    Scarlet fever is an illness caused by a strep infection. It causes a red, bumpy rash that spreads over most of the body, and is treated with antibiotics.

  • Sinusitis

    Sinus infections, or sinusitis, are common and easily treated.

  • Strep Throat

    Strep throat is a common cause of sore throat in kids and teens. It usually requires treatment with antibiotics, but improves in a few days.

  • The Flu (Influenza)

    Flu symptoms tend to come on quickly and are worse than the sneezing and stuffiness of a cold. The flu is very contagious. Find out what to do in this article for parents.

  • Tuberculosis

    Tuberculosis (TB) is making a comeback in the United States today. Find out who's at risk, what to watch for, and how doctors treat TB.

  • Walking Pneumonia

    Many kids with this milder version of pneumonia feel well enough to go to school. But it's important to keep kids home until after treatment kicks in and symptoms improve.

  • Whooping Cough (Pertussis)

    Pertussis is characterized by severe coughing spells that end in a whooping sound when the person breathes in. It can be prevented with the pertussis vaccine, part of the DTaP immunization.

  • Basic Blood Chemistry Tests

    Doctors order basic blood chemistry tests to assess a wide range of conditions and the function of organs.

  • Blood Culture

    A blood culture is a test that looks for germs (such as bacteria or fungi) in the blood.

  • Blood Test: Complete Blood Count

    The complete blood count (CBC) is the most common blood test. It analyzes red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

  • Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    Liver function tests can help doctors see if the liver has been damaged. They also can help diagnose infections and monitor medications that can cause liver-related side effects.

  • Stool Tests

    Your child's doctor may order a stool collection test to check for blood, bacteria, ova, or parasites. Find out how this test is performed and when you can expect the results.

  • Strep Test: Throat Culture

    Is your child having a strep test or a throat culture? Find out how these swab tests are performed.

  • Urine Tests

    Is your child having a urine culture or urinalysis performed? Find out why urine tests are performed, and what to expect when the doctor orders them.

  • 5 Things to Know About Zika and Pregnancy

    Zika virus, spread by mosquitoes, is the cause of a serious birth defect. Here are 5 things to know about Zika and pregnancy.

  • Amebiasis

    Amebiasis is an intestinal illness transmitted when someone eats or drinks something that's contaminated with a microscopic parasite.

  • Ascariasis

    Ascariasis is an intestinal infection that occurs when the eggs of a parasitic roundworm are ingested. Read about signs and symptoms, treatment, and tips for prevention.

  • Bedbugs

    Bedbugs have people on high alert, checking mattresses and furniture for telltale signs of these irritating, hard-to-control pests. Here's what to look for and how to deal with them.

  • Chigger Bites

    Chiggers are tiny red mites whose bites aren't painful but do cause intense itching. Home care can help the itchiness.

  • Fighting Germs

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa can cause disease. Here's how to help protect your family from germs.

  • Giardiasis

    Giardiasis, one of the chief causes of diarrhea in the United States, is an intestinal illness caused by a microscopic parasite.

  • Head Lice

    Lice aren't dangerous and they don't spread disease, but they are contagious, annoying, and sometimes hard to get rid of. Learn more about this common childhood problem and how to get rid of those pesky little bugs.

  • Infections That Pets Can Spread

    Kids can benefit from the companionship, affection, and relationships they share with pets. But it's important to know how to protect your family from infections carried by pets and other animals.

  • Malaria

    Malaria - a common infection in hot, tropical areas - is a leading cause of death worldwide. But if diagnosed early and treated, it can be cured.

  • Mosquito-Borne Diseases

    Mosquito-borne diseases are illnesses spread by the bite of an infected mosquito.

  • Pinworm Infections

    Pinworm is an intestinal infection caused by tiny parasitic worms. But pinworms don't cause any harm (just itching), and it won't take long to get rid of them.

  • Pubic Lice (Crabs)

    Pubic lice are six-legged creatures that infest the hair in the pubic area. Pubic lice infestation is considered a sexually transmitted disease (STD), but it can be contracted in other ways.

  • Toxocariasis

    Toxocara are common parasites of dogs and cats. When they infect humans, the illness is called toxocariasis.

  • Toxoplasmosis

    Toxoplasmosis is an infection that passes from animals to humans, sometimes without causing any symptoms. Learn more about this infection in this article for parents.

  • Trichomoniasis

    Trichomoniasis (or "trich") is a sexually transmitted disease. Many people with trich have no symptoms, so they can spread it to others without knowing it.

  • Zika Virus

    Zika is a virus that a person can catch if bitten by an infected mosquito. Outbreaks of the virus have happened throughout the world, particularly in tropical areas where certain types of mosquitoes live.

  • Chlamydia

    Chlamydia is an STD caused by bacteria. It's important to know the symptoms, as treatment can prevent the infection from leading to other health problems.

  • Fighting Germs

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa can cause disease. Here's how to help protect your family from germs.

  • Genital Herpes

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that's usually caused by the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2).

  • Genital Warts (HPV)

    Genital warts usually are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), which also can lead to cervical cancer and other types of cancer. A vaccine can prevent HPV infection.

  • Gonorrhea

    Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Many people with gonorrhea have no symptoms. They can spread the infection to others without knowing it.

  • HIV and AIDS

    Parents can help prevent HIV/AIDS by learning the facts and talking with their kids regularly about healthy behaviors, feelings, and sexuality.

  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a serious infection of the female reproductive organs that may cause severe symptoms, minor symptoms, or no symptoms at all.

  • PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis)

    PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is when someone takes medicines every day to lower his or her chances of getting HIV.

  • Pubic Lice (Crabs)

    Pubic lice are six-legged creatures that infest the hair in the pubic area. Pubic lice infestation is considered a sexually transmitted disease (STD), but it can be contracted in other ways.

  • STDs

    Parents should learn about the most common STDs, how they spread, and how they're diagnosed and treated.

  • Syphilis

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Early treatment can cure it and prevent long-term problems.

  • Talking to Your Kids About STDs

    Your kids need to understand how STDs spread and how to protect themselves. Here's how to talk to them about sexually transmitted diseases.

  • Trichomoniasis

    Trichomoniasis (or "trich") is a sexually transmitted disease. Many people with trich have no symptoms, so they can spread it to others without knowing it.

  • Abscess

    An abscess is a sign of an infection, usually on the skin. Find out what to do if your child develops one.

  • Acanthosis Nigricans

    Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a condition that causes the skin to thicken and darken in places. AN is not harmful or contagious, but can be a sign of certain other medical conditions.

  • Cellulitis

    Cellulitis is an infection of the skin and underlying tissues that can affect any area of the body. It begins in an area of broken skin, like a cut or scratch.

  • Chickenpox

    Chickenpox used to be common in kids, causing a very itchy red rash all over the body. But the good news is that a vaccine can prevent most cases.

  • Cold Sores

    Cold sores are small and painful blisters that appear around the mouth, face, or nose. They're very common and, while uncomfortable, usually go away on their own.

  • Cradle Cap (Seborrheic Dermatitis) in Infants

    This harmless condition - the infant form of dandruff - causes rough, scaly patches on a baby's skin.

  • Dandruff

    Got flakes? Most cases of dandruff don't require a visit to a doctor's office. Treat them at home with special, over-the-counter dandruff shampoos.

  • Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

    Eczema can be an itchy nuisance and cause scratching that makes the problem worse. Many kids who have eczema today will be over it by the time they're teens.

  • Erythema Multiforme

    By the looks of the "bulls-eye" marks this rash leaves on the skin, you might think it's cause for concern. But erythema multiforme clears up on its own within a few weeks.

  • Fifth Disease

    Especially common in kids between the ages of 5 and 15, fifth disease is a viral illness that produces a distinctive red rash on the face, body, arms, and legs.

  • Genital Herpes

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that's usually caused by the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2).

  • Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFM) is a common viral infection that causes painful red blisters in the mouth and throat, and on the hands, feet, and diaper area.

  • Hives (Urticaria)

    Has your child broken out in welts? It could be a case of the hives. Learn how to soothe itchy bumps and help your child feel better.

  • Impetigo

    Impetigo is a contagious skin infection that causes blisters or sores on the face, neck, hands, and diaper area. Learn how this common problem is treated and what can help prevent it.

  • Infections That Pets Can Spread

    Kids can benefit from the companionship, affection, and relationships they share with pets. But it's important to know how to protect your family from infections carried by pets and other animals.

  • Inflammation

    Inflammation is one way the body reacts to infection, injury, or other medical conditions. Many things can cause it.

  • Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease can affect the skin, joints, nervous system, and other organ systems. If Lyme disease is diagnosed quickly and treated with antibiotics, most people feel better quickly.

  • Measles

    Measles is best known for the skin rash it causes. Although rare, outbreaks can happen. Getting your kids fully vaccinated is the best way to protect them from this disease.

  • Molluscum Contagiosum

    Molluscum contagiosum is a common viral skin infection. For most children, the rash isn't a big deal and goes away on its own over time.

  • Oral Thrush

    Oral thrush, a very common infection in infants that causes irritation in and around the baby's mouth, often goes away on its own without medical treatment.

  • Paronychia

    Paronychia is an infection of the skin around a fingernail or toenail. Most of the time, it's not serious and can be treated at home. Learn what causes it, what to do, and how to prevent it.

  • Pilonidal Cyst

    A pilonidal cyst is a fluid-filled sac under the skin in the lower back, near the crease of the buttocks.

  • Pityriasis Rosea

    This harmless rash often forms a telltale "Christmas tree" pattern on the back that makes it easy to identify.

  • Pityriasis Versicolor

    Pityriasis versicolor is a rash caused by a fungus. It can appear over the chest, shoulders, and back, and is a common cause of skin rashes in teens.

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is an infection spread by ticks. Find out more about it - including how to prevent it.

  • Roseola

    Roseola is a viral illness that usually affects kids between 6 months and 3 years old. Learn its signs and symptoms when to call the doctor.

  • Rubella (German Measles)

    Rubella infection, or German measles, usually is a mild disease in kids that can be prevented with vaccination. Its primary medical danger is to pregnant women because it can affect developing babies.

  • Scabies

    Scabies is an infestation that affects the skin, and is caused by a mite that burrows into the top layer of skin. It causes itching and bumps or blisters.

  • Scarlet Fever

    Scarlet fever is an illness caused by a strep infection. It causes a red, bumpy rash that spreads over most of the body, and is treated with antibiotics.

  • Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Toxic shock syndrome is a serious but uncommon bacterial infection. TSS is a medical emergency - symptoms include sudden high fever, a faint feeling, diarrhea, headache, and muscle aches.

  • Vaginitis in Children

    Vaginitis is redness, soreness, or swelling in and around the vagina. It's common in girls of all ages, and usually can be treated at home.

  • Vitiligo

    While vitiligo might make kids self-conscious, this skin condition is not medically dangerous. Kids with vitiligo are as healthy as other kids.

  • Warts

    Many of us have had a wart somewhere on our bodies at some time. But other than being a nuisance, most warts are harmless.

  • Wound Healing and Care

    How well a wound heals depends on where it is on the body and what caused it. Good home care is an important part of healing.

What next?

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There are 10 nurses in the picture.

And we have many more pediatric primary care providers in Northeast Ohio. You can meet some of them here.
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The five differences are:
– Phone color
– Coat pocket
– Stethoscope earpiece color
– Stethoscope bell dot
– Clipboard paper color

Need help finding a doctor, choosing a location or getting a general question about Akron Children's answered? Call us or fill out the form and we'll help in any way we can.
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The two matching doctors are 9 and 14.

With virtual visits, you can see our pediatric experts from the comfort of home or wherever you are.
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The correct path:
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We offer many ways to get pediatric care all over Northeast Ohio. Use this page to find the right kind of care and the most convenient location for you.