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First Aid & Safety

  • A to Z: Head Injury

    Learn more about head injuries (head trauma).

  • Bites and Scratches

    Animal bites and scratches, even minor ones, can become infected and spread bacteria to other parts of the body, regardless of whether the animal is a family pet or a wild animal.

  • Buckle Fractures

    A buckle or torus fracture is a type of broken bone. One side of the bone bends, raising a little buckle, without breaking the other side of the bone.

  • Bug Bites and Stings

    Most bug bites and stings are just annoying. But some can cause infections and allergic reactions. It's important to know what to watch for, and when to get medical attention.

  • Burns

    Burns, especially scalds from hot water and liquids, are some of the most common childhood accidents. Minor burns often can be safely treated at home, but more serious burns require medical care.

  • Choking

    Choking is an emergency - so it's important to recognize the signs of choking and know what to do if happens.

  • Comminuted Fractures

    A comminuted fracture is a type of broken bone. The bone is broken into more than two pieces.

  • Concussions

    Concussions are serious injuries that can be even more serious if kids don't get the time and rest needed to heal them completely.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Being Ready to Quarantine

    People who have a coronavirus (COVID-19) infection or are around someone who has it should stay home to prevent spreading the virus. Here's how to prepare to quarantine or isolate at home.

  • CPR

    Every parent should know how and when to administer CPR. Done correctly, CPR can save a child's life by restoring breathing and circulation until medical personnel arrive.

  • Dealing With Cuts

    Find out how to handle minor cuts at home - and when to get medical care for a more serious injury.

  • Dehydration

    Sometimes kids lose fluids and salts through fever, diarrhea, vomiting, or sweating. Here are some tips on preventing or treating dehydration.

  • Fevers

    Fevers happen when the body's internal "thermostat" raises the body temperature above normal. This is often the body's way of fighting infections.

  • Fire Safety

    Find out how to prevent - and be ready for - a fire in your home.

  • First Aid: Poisoning

    Most childhood poisonings happen in the home. They usually can be treated at home with advice from the poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

  • Frostbite and Frostnip

    You can help prevent frostbite in cold weather by dressing kids in layers, making sure they come indoors at regular intervals, and watching for frostnip, frostbite's early warning signal.

  • Going to the Emergency Room

    Knowing what to expect when you need to take your child to the emergency room can help make it a little less stressful.

  • Greenstick Fractures

    A greenstick fracture is a type of broken bone. The bone cracks on one side only, not all the way through the bone.

  • Head Injuries

    Head injuries can be external or internal. Learn more about both kinds, how to prevent them, and what to do if your child is injured.

  • Heat Illness

    Active kids can be at risk for heat illness, which can result in heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heatstroke. Learn how to prevent and treat heat illness.

  • Hemophilia: Handling Bleeds

    Kids with hemophilia can bleed easily or longer than normal. So it's important for parents to know how to handle bleeding when it happens.

  • How to Take Your Child's Pulse

    Need to check your child's heart rate? Follow our guide and check with your doctor if you have questions.

  • How to Take Your Child's Temperature

    All kids get a fever from time to time. Here's how to take your child's temperature, safely and accurately.

  • Nosebleeds

    A nosebleed can be scary, but it's rarely cause for alarm. Here's how to handle one at home.

  • Preventing Eye Injuries

    Eye injuries in kids can lead to serious vision problems, even blindness. Wearing protective eyewear can prevent most eye injuries.

  • Serious Allergic Reactions (Anaphylaxis)

    Kids with severe allergies can be at risk for a sudden, serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. The good news is that when treated properly, anaphylaxis can be managed.

  • Teaching Your Child How to Use 911

    Teaching your child how to use 911 in an emergency could be one of the simplest - and most important - lessons you'll ever share.

  • Vomiting

    Most vomiting is caused by gastroenteritis, and usually isn't serious. These home-care tips can help prevent dehydration.

  • What Is a Medical Record?

    A medical record is a history of someone’s health. Most hospitals and doctor’s offices use electronic health records.

  • What You Need to Know in an Emergency

    In an emergency, it's hard to think clearly about your kids' health information. Here's what important medical information you should have handy, just in case.

  • When and Where to Get Medical Care

    Should you head to the ER when your child is hurt or ill? What about an urgent care center? Different problems need different levels of care, and you have many options.

  • Wound Healing and Care

    How well a wound heals depends on where it is on the body and what caused it. Good home care is an important part of healing.

  • All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Safety

    ATVs are off-road vehicles often used for recreation. But kids 16 and younger shouldn't ride them. Find out why, and more, here.

  • Are Insect Repellents With DEET Safe for Kids?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Bee, Wasp, and Ant Stings

    Bee, wasp, and ant stings can cause temporary discomfort and pain, but most don’t lead to serious or lasting health problems.

  • Bug Bites and Stings

    Most bug bites and stings are just annoying. But some can cause infections and allergic reactions. It's important to know what to watch for, and when to get medical attention.

  • Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety

    In ice and snow, accidents can happen easily. Find out how to keep your family safe - and fit - while the weather is chilly.

  • Drowning Prevention

    Drowning is a leading cause of death in children and teens. It happens fast and is usually silent. Here's how parents can help prevent drowning.

  • Fireworks Safety

    Before your family celebrates a holiday, make sure everyone knows about fireworks safety.

  • First Aid: Heat Illness

    In hot weather, a child's internal temperature can rise and cause heat exhaustion, which can progress to heatstroke if not treated quickly.

  • First Aid: Insect Stings and Bites

    Being stung by a bug is often just irritating and doesn't require medical treatment. But kids who are highly allergic to stings may need emergency medical care.

  • First Aid: Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac

    Mild rashes from poison ivy, oak, and sumac plants can be treated at home. But severe and widespread rashes require medical treatment.

  • First Aid: Spider Bites

    Most spider bites cause mild reactions, but some can cause serious illness or allergic reactions. Here's what to do if you think your child was bitten by a spider.

  • First Aid: Sunburn

    You can treat mild sunburn at home. But severe sunburn needs medical attention. Here's what to do.

  • First Aid: Tick Bites

    Some ticks carry harmful germs that can cause disease. Find out what to do if your child is bitten by a tick.

  • Frostbite and Frostnip

    You can help prevent frostbite in cold weather by dressing kids in layers, making sure they come indoors at regular intervals, and watching for frostnip, frostbite's early warning signal.

  • Halloween Candy Hints

    For health-conscious parents, Halloween can be tricky. Do you set limits? Do you let kids decide how much to eat? There isn't just one right answer.

  • Halloween Safety Tips

    From the candy to the costumes, Halloween is a fun-filled time. But it can pose dangers to young revelers. For a trick-free treat, follow these simple safety tips.

  • How Can I Protect My Family From Ticks?

    Find out what the experts say.

  • How to Choose & Use Sunscreen

    With all the options out there, choosing a sunscreen for your kids can be tricky. Here's what you need to know.

  • Jellyfish Stings

    Ocean dips are a cool part of summer, but jellyfish can spoil the fun. Here's how to handle a sting from by one of these mysterious sea creatures.

  • Keeping Kids Safe in Cars

    More kids are injured in auto collisions than in any other type of accident, but you can protect them by learning the proper use of car seats and booster seats.

  • Mosquito-Borne Diseases

    Mosquito-borne diseases are illnesses spread by the bite of an infected mosquito.

  • Outdoor Water Safety

    Swimming in an open body of water (like a river, lake, or ocean) is different from swimming in a pool. Here are some tips based on the type of water.

  • Playground Safety

    Following these safety guidelines can make neighborhood playgrounds entertaining and safe for your kids.

  • Poison Ivy

    Most people get a reaction to poison ivy. Check out this article for tips on what to do and how to avoid poison ivy.

  • Pool Safety

    Having a pool, pond, spa, or hot tub on your property is a huge responsibility when it comes to safety. Here’s how can you keep kids – yours and others – safe.

  • Preventing Abductions

    It's important to teach your kids to be cautious without filling them with fear or anxiety. Here are ways to lessen the chances that your child will be abducted.

  • Preventing Dog Bites

    Teaching kids a few basic dog manners will help them enjoy safe encounters with Fido.

  • Scorpion Stings

    If a scorpion stings someone, the area of the sting will hurt and may get swollen or red, depending on the type of scorpion.

  • Spider Bites

    Spiders rarely bite people. When they do, it’s usually in self-defense because they’re being crushed by a human. Usually, their venom is not strong enough to hurt humans.

  • Sun Safety

    By teaching kids how to enjoy fun in the sun safely, parents can reduce their risk for developing skin cancer.

  • Tick Bites

    When a tick bites, the person won’t feel it happen. Always check your kids (and yourself) for ticks after spending time in the woods.

  • Tick Removal: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Boy, your child's freckles really stand out in the sun — yikes, that one is actually a tick! What should you do?

  • Water Park Safety

    Water parks are a lot of fun and a great way to spend time outside. Here's how kids can enjoy them safely.

  • Water Safety

    Kids need constant supervision around water — whether the water is in a bathtub, pool, the sea, or a water park. Here's how to keep them safe.

  • West Nile Virus

    The threat of West Nile virus has made getting a mosquito bite a cause for concern. What is West Nile virus, and what can you do to prevent it?

  • All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Safety

    ATVs are off-road vehicles often used for recreation. But kids 16 and younger shouldn't ride them. Find out why, and more, here.

  • Bike Safety

    Bike riding is a great way to get exercise and share time as a family. But there's an important factor that you need to consider - safety.

  • Bruises

    Learn about bruises, why they happen, how to make them go away faster, and why they change colors.

  • Drowning Prevention

    Drowning is a leading cause of death in children and teens. It happens fast and is usually silent. Here's how parents can help prevent drowning.

  • How Can Parents Help Prevent Concussions?

    Concussions are serious injuries. Here's how to help protect kids and teens from these mild traumatic brain injuries.

  • How to Choose & Use Sunscreen

    With all the options out there, choosing a sunscreen for your kids can be tricky. Here's what you need to know.

  • Is It OK for Kids to Sleep After a Possible Concussion?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Playground Safety

    Following these safety guidelines can make neighborhood playgrounds entertaining and safe for your kids.

  • Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    Participation in sports can teach kids sportsmanship and discipline. But sports also carry the potential for injury. Here's how to protect your kids.

  • Safety Tips: Baseball

    Baseball is by no means a dangerous sport. But it can present a very real risk of injuries from things like wild pitches, batted balls, and collisions in the field. These safety tips can help keep your kids safe on the diamond.

  • Safety Tips: Basketball

    Basketball is fun - but it's also a contact sport, and injuries happen. To help your kids stay safe on the basketball court, take a look at these safety tips.

  • Safety Tips: Football

    Football is a lot of fun, but injuries are common. To keep things as safe as possible on the gridiron, players should follow these tips.

  • Safety Tips: Hockey

    As fun as it is, ice hockey carries a very real risk of injury. To keep your kids as safe as possible, follow these tips.

  • Safety Tips: Lacrosse

    Lacrosse is a fast-moving, fun sport to play and watch. But injuries are bound to happen. Here's how to help players avoid them.

  • Safety Tips: Running

    Injuries can be common, and runners should always be aware of their surroundings. These tips can help keep runners safe.

  • Safety Tips: Skateboarding

    Skateboarding is undeniably cool, but it's also easy for riders to get hurt. Help your kids keep it safe with these safety tips.

  • Safety Tips: Skiing

    Skiing is fun but also has some very real dangers. Make sure your kids follow these safety tips to learn how to stay safe on the slopes.

  • Safety Tips: Sledding

    Sledding is a lot of fun, but can also cause injuries, some of them pretty serious. To keep your kids safe while sledding, make sure they follow these safety tips.

  • Safety Tips: Snowboarding

    Snowboarding is a great way to have fun and get exercise, but it has some very real dangers. These safety tips can help keep your family safe on the slopes.

  • Safety Tips: Wrestling

    In wrestling, injuries are bound to happen sometimes. To keep things as safe as possible, wrestlers should follow these tips

  • First Aid: Allergic Reactions

    Although most allergic reactions aren't serious, severe reactions can be life-threatening and can require immediate medical attention.

  • First Aid: Animal Bites

    Animal bites and scratches that break the skin can cause infection. Rarely, animal bites can cause rabies, a dangerous, life-threatening disease.

  • First Aid: Asthma Flare-Ups

    During a flare-up or attack, it's hard to breathe. While some flare-ups are mild, others can be life threatening, so it's important to deal with them right away.

  • First Aid: Broken Bones

    A broken bone needs emergency medical care. Here's what to do if you think your child fractured a bone.

  • First Aid: Burns

    Scald burns from hot water and other liquids are the most common type of burn young kids get. Here's what to do if your child is burned.

  • First Aid: Chest Pains

    Chest pain can be caused by many things, but it is rarely a sign of heart trouble in children. Here's what to do about it.

  • First Aid: Chickenpox

    Chickenpox (varicella) has become less common in the U.S. due to the chickenpox vaccine, but it can easily spread from one person to another.

  • First Aid: Choking

    Choking can be a life-threatening emergency. Follow these steps if your child is choking.

  • First Aid: Common Cold

    Kids can get up to eight colds a year - or more. The common cold sends more kids to the doctor than any other illness.

  • First Aid: Constipation

    Constipation is when a child has fewer bowel movements than usual. Ease constipation with the three Fs: fluid, fiber, and fitness.

  • First Aid: Croup

    Croup is a viral infection that causes a telltake "barking" cough. Find out what to do if your child has croup and when to call the doctor.

  • First Aid: Cuts

    Most cuts can be safely treated at home. But deeper cuts - or any wounds that won't stop bleeding - need emergency medical treatment.

  • First Aid: Dehydration

    Kids can become dehydrated when their bodies lose very large amounts of fluids. It's important to replenish fluid losses as quickly as possible.

  • First Aid: Diaper Rash

    Diaper rash is a common skin condition in babies. In most cases, the condition clears up quickly with a few simple changes.

  • First Aid: Diarrhea

    Diarrhea is common and usually not a sign of something serious. Find out what to do if your child has diarrhea.

  • First Aid: Dislocations

    A dislocation happens when two connected bones are separated. These injuries require emergency medical care to avoid further damage.

  • First Aid: Earaches

    An earache requires a visit to the doctor's office. Here's what to do if your child complains of ear pain.

  • First Aid: Eye Injuries

    Some eye injuries can be treated at home, while others require a visit to the doctor or emergency room. Find out what to do if your child has eye pain.

  • First Aid: Fainting

    Fainting is a loss of consciousness that can be caused by many things. Here's what to do if your child faints or is about to faint.

  • First Aid: Falls

    Although most result in mild bumps and bruises, some falls can cause serious injuries that need medical attention.

  • First Aid: Febrile Seizures

    Febrile seizures are convulsions that happen in some children with fevers. They usually stop on their own after a few minutes and don't cause any other health problems.

  • First Aid: Fever

    Fevers are usually not cause for alarm - they're the body's way of fighting infection. Here's what to do if your child has a fever.

  • First Aid: Frostbite

    Exposure to extreme cold can cause frostbite, a serious condition that requires emergency care. Here's what to do if your child has frostbite.

  • First Aid: Head Injuries

    Learn about the different types of head injuries, and find out what to do if your child is seriously injuried.

  • First Aid: Head Lice

    Lice commonly spread from kid to kid. They're not dangerous - but they are creepy and annoying. Here's what to do about them.

  • First Aid: Headaches

    Headaches are rarely a sign of something serious. Here's what to do if your child has a headache.

  • First Aid: Heat Illness

    In hot weather, a child's internal temperature can rise and cause heat exhaustion, which can progress to heatstroke if not treated quickly.

  • First Aid: Insect Stings and Bites

    Being stung by a bug is often just irritating and doesn't require medical treatment. But kids who are highly allergic to stings may need emergency medical care.

  • First Aid: Nosebleeds

    Although they can be serious, nosebleeds are common in children ages 3 to 10 years and most stop on their own.

  • First Aid: Pain With Urinating (Peeing)

    When it hurts to pee, a urinary tract infection (UTI) is usually to blame. But there are other causes. Here's what to do.

  • First Aid: Pinkeye

    Pinkeye is an inflammation of the white part of the eye and the inner eyelids. Although some kinds of pinkeye go away on their own, others require treatment.

  • First Aid: Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac

    Mild rashes from poison ivy, oak, and sumac plants can be treated at home. But severe and widespread rashes require medical treatment.

  • First Aid: Poisoning

    Most childhood poisonings happen in the home. They usually can be treated at home with advice from the poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

  • First Aid: Rashes

    Sometimes rashes are only a minor annoyance. Other times, they are more serious and require medical treatment. Here's what to do if your child has a rash.

  • First Aid: Ringworm

    Ringworm is a common fungal infection of the skin. Here's what to do if your child has ringworm.

  • First Aid: Seizures

    Although seizures can be frightening, usually they last only a few minutes, stop on their own, and are almost never life-threatening.

  • First Aid: Sore Throat

    Sore throats are usually caused by viruses. Here's what to do if your child has a sore throat.

  • First Aid: Spider Bites

    Most spider bites cause mild reactions, but some can cause serious illness or allergic reactions. Here's what to do if you think your child was bitten by a spider.

  • First Aid: Splinters

    Taking a splinter out as soon as you spot it helps prevent infection and makes removal easier.

  • First Aid: Stiff Neck

    A stiff neck is usually nothing to worry about. In rare cases, it can be a sign of something serious. Here's what to do about a stiff neck.

  • First Aid: Stomachaches

    Stomachaches are common in childhood, and often caused by gas, constipation or viruses. Find out when a stomachache requires a trip to the doctor.

  • First Aid: Strains and Sprains

    Here's what to do if you think your child has pulled or torn a muscle, ligament, or tendon.

  • First Aid: Sunburn

    You can treat mild sunburn at home. But severe sunburn needs medical attention. Here's what to do.

  • First Aid: Teeth Injuries

    If your child loses a baby tooth, there's no need to replace it. But if a permanent tooth is dislodged, it's a dental emergency. Here's what to do.

  • First Aid: The Flu

    Telltale signs of the flu include a sore throat, body aches and fever. Here's what to do if your child has the flu.

  • First Aid: Tick Bites

    Some ticks carry harmful germs that can cause disease. Find out what to do if your child is bitten by a tick.

  • First Aid: Vomiting

    Vomiting can be caused by many things, most commonly gastroenteritis (the "stomach flu"). Here's what to do when your child throws up.

  • First Aid: Warts

    Warts are common skin infections. They generally don't cause any serious problems, so usually don't need to be removed.

  • Handling Injuries & Illnesses

    From minor injuries to medical emergencies, these guides help you deal with common childhood mishaps.

  • How to Handle a Cough

    Coughing is a healthy reflex that helps clear the airways. A severe or lingering cough requires medical treatment, but many coughs are caused by viruses that just need to run their course.

  • Bathroom Water Safety

    Always supervise young kids in the bath to keep them safe. Here are other bathroom water safety tips.

  • Drowning Prevention

    Drowning is a leading cause of death in children and teens. It happens fast and is usually silent. Here's how parents can help prevent drowning.

  • Household Safety: Water & Drowning Hazards

    Water safety is important at any age, but especially if you have babies or toddlers. Here's how to reduce drowning risks.

  • Jellyfish Stings

    Ocean dips are a cool part of summer, but jellyfish can spoil the fun. Here's how to handle a sting from by one of these mysterious sea creatures.

  • Outdoor Water Safety

    Swimming in an open body of water (like a river, lake, or ocean) is different from swimming in a pool. Here are some tips based on the type of water.

  • Pool Safety

    Having a pool, pond, spa, or hot tub on your property is a huge responsibility when it comes to safety. Here’s how can you keep kids – yours and others – safe.

  • Water Park Safety

    Water parks are a lot of fun and a great way to spend time outside. Here's how kids can enjoy them safely.

  • Water Safety

    Kids need constant supervision around water — whether the water is in a bathtub, pool, the sea, or a water park. Here's how to keep them safe.

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There are 10 nurses in the picture.

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The five differences are:
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The two matching doctors are 9 and 14.

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The correct path:
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We offer many ways to get pediatric care all over Northeast Ohio. Use this page to find the right kind of care and the most convenient location for you.