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Pregnancy & Newborn Center Content List

  • Are You in Labor?

    Here's how to tell the difference between true labor and false labor -- and when to get medical care.

  • Choking

    Choking is an emergency - so it's important to recognize the signs of choking and know what to do if happens.

  • Looking at Your Newborn: What's Normal

    When you first meet your newborn, you may be surprised by what you see. Here's what to expect.

  • The First Day of Life

    Your baby's here! Find out what to expect on that special day first day of life.

  • Can I Feed My Baby Honey?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Choking

    Choking is an emergency - so it's important to recognize the signs of choking and know what to do if happens.

  • Circumcision

    You have an important decision to make before you take your newborn son home: whether to circumcise him. Before deciding, talk to your doctor and consider the issues.

  • Constipation

    Constipation is a very common problem among kids, and it usually occurs because a child's diet doesn't include enough fluids and fiber. In most cases, simple changes can help kids go.

  • Cradle Cap (Seborrheic Dermatitis) in Infants

    This harmless condition - the infant form of dandruff - causes rough, scaly patches on a baby's skin.

  • Diaper Rash

    Diaper rash is a very common infection that can cause a baby's skin to become sore, red, scaly, and tender. In most cases, it clears up with simple changes in diapering.

  • Formula Feeding FAQs: Starting Solids and Milk

    Find answers to common inquiries about introducing solids and whole milk to formula-fed babies.

  • Growth Charts

    Doctors use growth charts to figure out whether kids' height and weight measurements are "normal" and whether they're developing on track. Here are some facts about growth charts.

  • How Can I Overcome Breastfeeding Difficulties?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Is My Baby Ready for Shoes?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Looking at Your Newborn: What's Normal

    When you first meet your newborn, you may be surprised by what you see. Here's what to expect.

  • Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    You probably have lots of questions about your baby's health. When should you call the doctor, and what medical care should you expect for your baby at this age?

  • Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    Because your baby begins to show his or her personality during these months, your questions may move from simple sleeping and eating concerns to those about physical and social development.

  • Newborn Screening Tests

    Newborn screening tests look for health conditions that aren't apparent at birth. Find out which tests are done.

  • Nursing Positions

    If you're a new mom, breastfeeding your baby can feel like a challenge. Check out this article for information on common nursing positions, proper latching-on techniques, and how to know if your baby is getting enough to eat.

  • Oral Thrush

    Oral thrush, a very common infection in infants that causes irritation in and around the baby's mouth, often goes away on its own without medical treatment.

  • Preparing to Adopt a Child

    Considering adoption? Here are some things to know about the health and medical care of an adopted child, before, during, and after the adoption.

  • Sleep and Your Newborn

    Newborn babies don’t yet have a sense of day and night. They wake often to eat – no matter what time it is.

  • Talking to Your Child's Doctor

    Building a relationship with your child's doctor requires communication and reasonable expectations.

  • Teething Tots

    Teething can be a tough time for babies and parents. Here are the facts on teething, including tips for baby teeth hygiene and relieving pain.

  • The First Day of Life

    Your baby's here! Find out what to expect on that special day first day of life.

  • What Is the Apgar Score?

    The Apgar score is the very first test given to a newborn, done right after birth in the delivery or birthing room.

  • What to Do When Babies Cry

    During the first 3 months of life, babies cry more than at any other time. Here's how to soothe them.

  • Why Do Newborns Need a Vitamin K Shot?

    Why do newborns need a dose of vitamin K at birth? Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Your Child's Checkup: 3 to 5 Days

    Find out what this doctor's checkup will involve a few days after your baby is born.

  • Your Child's Checkup: Newborn

    Find out what this doctor's checkup will involve after your baby arrives.

  • Your Newborn's Hearing, Vision, and Other Senses

    Your newborn is taking in first sights, sounds, and smells while learning to explore the world through the senses. What are your baby's responses to light, noise, and touch?

  • A to Z: Colic

    Colic is defined as crying for more than 3 hours a day, for more than 3 days a week, for at least 3 weeks.

  • Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby Syndrome)

    Abusive head trauma is the leading cause of death in child abuse cases in the United States. It happens when someone shakes an infant.

  • Cleft Lip

    A cleft lip is when a baby's lip doesn't form properly during pregnancy. Most kids can have surgery to repair one early in life.

  • Cleft Palate

    A cleft palate is when a baby is born with a cleft (gap) in the roof of the mouth. Most kids can have surgery to repair them early in life.

  • Cleft Palate With Cleft Lip

    A cleft palate with a cleft lip is when a baby's lip and palate (roof of mouth) don't form properly during pregnancy. Most kids with cleft lip and palate are treated successfully with no lasting problems.

  • Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Some babies are born with a thyroid gland that didn't develop correctly or doesn't work as it should. This is called congenital hypothyroidism.

  • Constipation

    Constipation is a very common problem among kids, and it usually occurs because a child's diet doesn't include enough fluids and fiber. In most cases, simple changes can help kids go.

  • Cradle Cap (Seborrheic Dermatitis) in Infants

    This harmless condition - the infant form of dandruff - causes rough, scaly patches on a baby's skin.

  • Craniosynostosis

    Craniosynostosis is when seams between bones in the skull close too soon. When this happens, the skull can’t expand grow as it should, and it develops an unusual shape.

  • Diaper Rash

    Diaper rash is a very common infection that can cause a baby's skin to become sore, red, scaly, and tender. In most cases, it clears up with simple changes in diapering.

  • Ebstein Anomaly

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare heart defect that affects the tricuspid valve. It can cause problems that range from very mild to very serious.

  • Fetal Abdominal Cyst

    A fetal abdominal cyst is a bubble of fluid in a balloon-like bag in the belly of an unborn baby.

  • Fetal Lung Mass

    A fetal lung mass is an unusual lump that grows inside or next to an unborn baby’s lung. Some are treated before birth, while others are removed after the baby is born.

  • Galactosemia

    Some babies are born with the metabolic disorder glactosemia. They must drink soy-based formula instead of breast milk or a cow's milk-based formula.

  • Goldenhar Syndrome

    Goldenhar syndrome can cause incomplete development of bones in the face, affecting the ear, nose, soft palate, lip, and jaw. A cleft and craniofacial care team can help kids born with the condition.

  • Intestinal Malrotation

    Malrotation is a type of obstruction caused by abnormal development of the intestines while a fetus is in the womb. Find out more about this condition and the complications it can cause.

  • Laryngomalacia

    Laryngomalacia is a common cause of noisy breathing in infants.

  • Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare metabolic disorder that some babies are born with.

  • Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    You probably have lots of questions about your baby's health. When should you call the doctor, and what medical care should you expect for your baby at this age?

  • Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    Because your baby begins to show his or her personality during these months, your questions may move from simple sleeping and eating concerns to those about physical and social development.

  • Meningocele

    Some babies are born with a meningocele, which is a sac that pushes through the gap in the spine. With surgery to fix the problem, most babies with a meningocele live a healthy, normal life.

  • Myelomeningocele

    Myelomeningocele is a type of spina bifida in which a baby is born with a gap in the bones of the spine.

  • Nut and Peanut Allergy

    If your child is allergic to nuts or peanuts, it's essential to learn what foods might contain them and how to avoid them.

  • Omphalocele

    A baby born with an omphalocele has an opening where the umbilical cord goes into the belly. Some openings close on their own, but many need treatment, including surgery.

  • Oral Thrush

    Oral thrush, a very common infection in infants that causes irritation in and around the baby's mouth, often goes away on its own without medical treatment.

  • Orofacial Clefts

    A cleft is when tissues of the mouth or lip don't form properly when a baby is developing in the womb. The good news is that orofacial clefts are treatable.

  • Phenylketonuria (PKU)

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a metabolic disorder caused by a defect in the enzyme that breaks down an amino acid. PKU is treatable when it is found early.

  • Quick Summary: Treating Gastroschisis (Gastroschisis Silo)

    Gastroschisis is when a baby is born with the intestines, and sometimes other organs, sticking out through a hole in the belly wall near the umbilical cord. A gastroschisis silo allow the intestines to slowly move into the belly.

  • Sepsis

    Sepsis is a serious infection usually caused when bacteria make toxins that cause the immune system to attack the body's own organs and tissues.

  • Spina Bifida Occulta

    In spina bifida occulta, a baby is born with a gap in the spine's bones, but the spinal cord and its covering do not push through it.

  • Teething Tots

    Teething can be a tough time for babies and parents. Here are the facts on teething, including tips for baby teeth hygiene and relieving pain.

  • Umbilical Hernias

    An umbilical hernia shows up as a bump under the belly button. If a hernia doesn't go away by age 4 or 5 or causes problems, doctors may recommend surgery.

  • Tropical Smoothie

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Yogurt Parfait

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Fetal Echocardiogram

    A fetal echocardiogram (also called a fetal echo) uses sound waves to create pictures of an unborn baby's heart.

  • Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fetal MRI)

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (also called a fetal MRI) uses a magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed pictures of an unborn baby.

  • Newborn Screening Tests

    Newborn screening tests look for health conditions that aren't apparent at birth. Find out which tests are done.

  • Prenatal Test: First Trimester Screening

    The first trimester screening (or first trimester screen) includes a blood test and an ultrasound exam. It's done to see if a fetus is at risk for a chromosomal abnormality or birth defect.

  • When Your Teen Is Having a Baby

    If your daughter is pregnant and planning to have the baby, many changes await your family. How can you support her through the challenges to come?

What next?

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There are 10 nurses in the picture.

And we have many more pediatric primary care providers in Northeast Ohio. You can meet some of them here.
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The five differences are:
– Phone color
– Coat pocket
– Stethoscope earpiece color
– Stethoscope bell dot
– Clipboard paper color

Need help finding a doctor, choosing a location or getting a general question about Akron Children's answered? Call us or fill out the form and we'll help in any way we can.
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The two matching doctors are 9 and 14.

With virtual visits, you can see our pediatric experts from the comfort of home or wherever you are.
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The correct path:
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We offer many ways to get pediatric care all over Northeast Ohio. Use this page to find the right kind of care and the most convenient location for you.