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Heart Health Content List

  • A to Z: Atresia

    Learn about congenital defects and conditions that affect vessels, valves, and passages in the heart and other organs.

  • Aortic Stenosis

    Aortic stenosis means the aortic valve is too small, narrow, or stiff. Many people have no symptoms, but kids with more severe cases will need surgery so that blood flows properly through the body.

  • Cardiac Catheterization

    This minimally invasive procedure helps doctors perform diagnostic tests on the heart and even treat some heart conditions.

  • Heart and Circulatory System

    The heart and circulatory system are our body's lifeline, delivering blood to the body's tissues. Brush up on your ticker with this body basics article.

  • Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS)

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a birth defect of a baby’s heart. The left side of the heart doesn’t grow as it should, making it smaller and weaker than normal.

  • Quick Summary: Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS)

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a problem that happens when the left side of a baby’s heart doesn't form as it should. It’s smaller than normal and can’t pump enough blood to the body. After the baby is born, doctors can treat the problem with medicines and several surgeries.

  • Single Ventricle Defects

    Usually, a heart has two working ventricles (pumping chambers). Having a single ventricle means that only one of the two ventricles works well enough to pump blood.

  • Caffeine

    Caffeine is in many foods and drinks, but it's wise to keep caffeine consumption to a minimum, especially in younger kids. Here's why.

  • Carbohydrates and Sugar

    Carbs are the body's most important and readily available source of energy. The key is to eat healthy ones, like whole grains, and avoid foods with added sugar.

  • Cholesterol

    Most parents probably don't think about what cholesterol means for their kids. But high cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease, which has its roots in childhood.

  • Fats

    Some fats are good for kids and an important part of a healthy diet. Here's what parents should know.

  • Fitness and Your 13- to 18-Year-Old

    Kids who enjoy exercise tend to stay active throughout their lives. Learn how to encourage fitness in your teen.

  • Fitness and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old

    Kids this age are naturally active, so be sure to provide lots of opportunities for your child to practice basic skills, such as running, kicking, and throwing.

  • Fitness and Your 3- to 5-Year-Old

    Take advantage of your child's natural tendency to be active. Staying fit can help improve kids' self-esteem and decrease the risk of serious illnesses later in life.

  • Fitness and Your 6- to 12-Year-Old

    School-age kids need physical activity to build strength, coordination, confidence, and to lay the groundwork for a healthy lifestyle.

  • Fitness for Kids Who Don't Like Sports

    Some kids aren't natural athletes and they may say they just don't like sports. What then?

  • Healthy Eating

    Good nutrition and a balanced diet help kids grow up healthy. Here's how to improve nutrition and encourage smart eating habits.

  • How to Take Your Child's Pulse

    Need to check your child's heart rate? Follow our guide and check with your doctor if you have questions.

  • Kids and Exercise

    Besides enjoying the health benefits of regular exercise, kids who are physically fit are better able to handle physical and emotional challenges.

  • Strength Training

    With a properly designed and supervised program, strength training can be a fun way for kids to build healthy muscles, joints, and bones.

  • Teaching Your Child How to Swallow Pills

    Swallowing a pill is something that many of us take for granted. But just like any skill, learning to swallow a pill takes practice.

  • Your Child's Weight

    "What's the right weight for my child?" is one of the most common questions parents have. It seems like a simple one, but it's not always easy to answer.

What next?

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And we have many more pediatric primary care providers in Northeast Ohio. You can meet some of them here.
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Need help finding a doctor, choosing a location or getting a general question about Akron Children's answered? Call us or fill out the form and we'll help in any way we can.
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With virtual visits, you can see our pediatric experts from the comfort of home or wherever you are.
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We offer many ways to get pediatric care all over Northeast Ohio. Use this page to find the right kind of care and the most convenient location for you.