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Diseases & Conditions (for Teens)

  • 5 Ways to Be Prepared for an Allergy Emergency

    Quick action is essential during a serious allergic reaction. It helps to remind yourself of action steps so they become second nature if there's an emergency. Here's what to do.

  • Allergies

    Your eyes itch, your nose is running, you're sneezing, and you're covered in hives. The enemy known as allergies has struck again.

  • Allergy Testing

    Doctors use several different types of allergy tests, depending on what a person may be allergic to. Find out what to expect from allergy tests.

  • Asthma

    Asthma is a lung condition that makes it hard to breathe. Learn all about asthma here.

  • Celiac Disease

    People who have celiac disease, a disorder that makes their bodies react to gluten, can't eat certain kinds of foods. Find out more - including what foods are safe and where to find them.

  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complicated disease for doctors to diagnose — and even fully understand. Find out more about this often misunderstood condition.

  • Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Find out if allergies can make a person's asthma symptoms worse.

  • Eczema

    Eczema is a common skin problem among teens. If you have eczema, read this article to find out more about it and how you can deal with the skin stress.

  • Egg Allergy

    Living with an egg allergy means you have to be aware of what you're eating and read food labels carefully. Here are some tips for teens who have an egg allergy.

  • Food Allergies

    Doctors are diagnosing more and more people with food allergies. Knowing what to expect and how to deal with food allergies can make a big difference in preventing serious illness.

  • Food Allergies and Travel

    Taking precautions and carrying meds are just part of normal life for someone who has a food allergy. Here are some tips on how to make travel also feel perfectly routine.

  • Food Allergies: How to Cope

    With food allergies, preventing a reaction means avoiding that food entirely. But sometimes allergens can be hidden in places you don't expect. Here are tips on living with a food allergy.

  • Hives (Urticaria)

    Hives cause raised red bumps or welts on the skin. They're pretty common and usually not serious. Find out what to do about hives in this article for teens.

  • How Can I Deal With My Asthma?

    Asthma is more common these days than it used to be. The good news is it's also a lot easier to manage and control.

  • Milk Allergy

    Milk is in all kinds of foods, even things like baked goods. So what should a person who's allergic to milk do?

  • My Friend Has a Food Allergy. How Can I Help?

    Although food allergies are more common than ever, people who have them may feel different or embarrassed. A good friend can really help.

  • My Girlfriend Has a Peanut Allergy. Do We Have to Worry About Kissing?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Nut and Peanut Allergy

    Peanuts are one of the most common allergy-causing foods, and they often find their way into things you wouldn't imagine. Learn the facts on living with a nut or peanut allergy.

  • Poison Ivy

    Poison ivy can grow anywhere, from the woods to your backyard. This article for teens has tips on how to avoid the plant and what to do if you get a rash.

  • PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis)

    PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is when someone takes medicines every day to lower his or her chances of getting HIV.

  • Psoriasis

    Psoriasis causes skin cells to build up on the surface of the skin where they form itchy, red areas and thick scales. Find out how to deal with psoriasis, and what causes it, in this article for teens.

  • Serious Allergic Reactions (Anaphylaxis)

    A person with severe allergies can be at risk for a sudden, serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. This reaction can seem scary, but the good news is it can be treated.

  • Shellfish Allergy

    Shellfish allergies can be serious - and shellfish can appear in some surprising foods and products. Read about shellfish allergy and what to do when a reaction is severe.

  • Smoking and Asthma

    Find out why smoking is a bad idea - especially for people with asthma.

  • Spirometry (Video)

    Watch what it's like to get a spirometry test.

  • Stem Cell Transplants

    Stem cells can develop into cells with different skills, so they're useful in treating diseases like cancer.

  • Thrombocytopenia

    Thrombocytopenia is when someone has too few platelets in their bloodstream. Many things can cause it and most can be treated.

  • Anemia

    Anemia is common in teens because they undergo rapid growth spurts, when the body needs more nutrients like iron. Learn about anemia and how it's treated.

  • Blood Test (Video)

    These videos show what's involved in getting a blood test and what it's like to be the person taking the blood sample.

  • Blood Types

    Blood might look the same and do the same job, but tiny cell markers mean one person's body can reject another person's blood. Find out how blood types work in this article for teens.

  • Donating Blood

    There's a 97% chance that someone you know will need a blood transfusion. Blood donors — especially donors with certain blood types — are always in demand. Find out what's involved in this article for teens.

  • My Friend Has Sickle Cell Disease. How Can I Help?

    People with sickle cell disease need good friends who understand and can help them get through tough times. This article for teens helps you learn what you can do to be that friend.

  • Sickle Cell Crisis (Pain Crisis)

    Sickle cell crisis is when sickled cells clog small blood vessels, causing extreme pain and other symptoms. Learn more, including how to help prevent a crisis and what to do if one does happen.

  • Sickle Cell Disease

    Sickle cell disease is a blood disorder that makes red blood cells change shape and cause health problems. Find out more in this article for teens.

  • Stem Cell Transplants

    Stem cells can develop into cells with different skills, so they're useful in treating diseases like cancer.

  • Thrombocytopenia

    Thrombocytopenia is when someone has too few platelets in their bloodstream. Many things can cause it and most can be treated.

  • Transitioning Your Medical Care: Sickle Cell Disease

    At a certain point, you'll no longer be able to see your childhood doctor. Here are tips for teens on making a smooth switch to adult sickle cell care.

  • von Willebrand Disease

    When people have Von Willebrand disease, their blood doesn't clot properly. Many teens with VWD have such mild symptoms that they never know they have it.

  • Will I Pass Sickle Cell Disease on to My Children?

    Find out what the experts say.

  • Achilles Tendonitis

    If the tendon just above your heel becomes swollen or irritated due to overuse, it can lead to a painful condition called Achilles tendonitis. Find out how to treat it - and prevent it.

  • Ankle Sprains

    A sprained ankle is a very common injury that happens when the ligaments that support the ankle get overly stretched or torn. Find out how to avoid ankle sprains and what to do if you get one.

  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tears

    ACL injuries can happen in active and athletic kids when excessive pressure is put on the knee joint, resulting in a torn ligament.

  • Blount Disease

    Blount disease is a growth disorder that affects the bones of the lower leg. It causes bowing of the leg below the knee, which gets worse if it's not treated.

  • Broken Bones

    Bones are tough stuff - but even tough stuff can break. Find out what happens when a bone fractures.

  • Broken Collarbone (Clavicle Fracture)

    A broken collarbone is one of the most common types of broken bones. Find out how it can happen - and how to treat and avoid fractures.

  • Bursitis

    Bursitis, an irritation of the small fluid sacs that provide cushioning in some joints, is often caused by sports-related injuries or repeated use of a particular joint.

  • Casts

    This article for teens has tips on taking care of a cast so it keeps working as it should.

  • Cerebral Palsy: Ira's Story (Video)

    Ira has cerebral palsy (CP), but it doesn't interfere with his love of sports or his dream of being a broadcaster. Check out this video.

  • Comminuted Fractures

    A comminuted fracture is a type of broken bone. The bone is broken into more than two pieces.

  • Female Athlete Triad

    Female athlete triad is a combination of three conditions: disordered eating, amenorrhea (loss of a girl's period), and osteoporosis (a weakening of the bones).

  • Fibromyalgia

    Fibromyalgia is a long-term condition that causes pain in a person's muscles, joints, and other soft tissues. Find out how doctors tell if a person has fibromyalgia and what can be done to treat it.

  • First Aid: Broken Bones

    A broken bone requires emergency medical care. Here's what to do.

  • Greenstick Fractures

    A greenstick fracture is a type of broken bone. The bone cracks on one side only, not all the way through the bone.

  • Groin Strain

    A groin strain is when one or more of the muscles in the inner thigh gets stretched, injured, or torn. Find out what to do for groin strains.

  • Hamstring Strain

    A hamstring strain happens when one or more of the muscles in the back of the leg gets stretched too far and starts to tear. Find out how to treat hamstring strains in this article for teens.

  • Hip Pointer

    Most hip pointer injuries can be easily treated and heal in their own time. Find out what to do in this article for teens.

  • How Broken Bones Heal

    Broken bones have an amazing ability to heal. New bone forms within a few weeks of the injury, although full healing can take longer.

  • How the Joints Work

    See how the joints work.

  • Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)

    Learn about juvenile idiopathic arthritis, a specific kind of arthritis that usually occurs in kids and teens younger than 17.

  • Knee Injury: Caroline's Story

    Caroline loved sports. But when an ongoing knee injury kept her from playing the sports she loved, she discovered new interests. Read her story.

  • Kyphosis

    Your spine, or backbone, normally curves forward gently as it runs up your back. Sometimes, though, someone's back can be rounded too far forward, which is a condition known as kyphosis.

  • Lupus

    Lupus is a disease that affects the immune system. Learn how lupus is treated, signs and symptoms, how to support a friend who has it, and more.

  • Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MCL injuries happen when excessive pressure is put on the knee joint, causing a torn ligament.

  • Meniscus Tears

    The key to healing meniscus tears is not to get back into play too quickly. Find out what meniscus tears are and how to treat them.

  • Osgood-Schlatter Disease

    Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD) is an overuse injury that can cause knee pain in teens, especially during growth spurts. Learn more.

  • Osteomyelitis

    Sometimes a bad cut that gets infected can lead to even worse things, like a bone infection called osteomyelitis. The easiest way to protect yourself is to practice good hygiene.

  • Overuse Injuries

    Overuse (or repetitive stress) injuries happen when too much stress is placed on a part of the body, causing problems like swelling, pain, muscle strain, and tissue damage.

  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner's Knee)

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (or runner's knee) is the most common overuse injury among runners, but it can also happen to other athletes who do activities that require a lot of knee bending.

  • Proximal Biceps Tendonitis

    In teens, biceps tendonitis is usually an overuse injury that causes tendons in the upper arm to be swollen or irritated. Most cases heal on their own if you follow a few guidelines from your doctor.

  • Quadriceps Contusion

    Quadriceps contusions are common in sports that have a lot of direct contact or a chance of collisions or wipeouts. Find out what to do if you get one - and how to avoid them.

  • Repetitive Stress Injuries in Sports

    Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) happen when movements are repeated over and over, damaging a bone, tendon, or joint.

  • Scoliosis

    Scoliosis makes a person’s spine curve from side to side. Large curves can cause health problems like pain or breathing trouble. Health care providers treat scoliosis with back braces or surgery when needed.

  • Scoliosis: Bracing

    Some teens with scoliosis wear a brace to help stop their curve from getting worse as they grow. Find out more about how scoliosis braces work and how long people wear them in this article for teens.

  • Sever's Disease

    Sever's disease, a common heel injury, is due to inflammation (swelling) of the growth plate in the heel. While painful, it's only temporary and has no long-term effects.

  • Shin Splints

    Shin splints are pain on the inner part of the shinbone, often from running or another high-impact activity. They get better with rest.

  • Sinding-Larsen-Johansson Syndrome

    This growth-related injury is more common in teens who play sports that require a lot of running or jumping. Find out why it happens - and what you can do to avoid and treat it.

  • Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE)

    A good, stable connection at your hip joint is what lets you walk, run, make that jump shot, and shake it on the dance floor. But in some teens – particularly those who are obese – the hip joint is weakened by slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE).

  • Spinal Fusion Surgery

    A spinal fusion is a surgical procedure that's done to stabilize or straighten the bones in the back. It can help some teens with scoliosis.

  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Steven's Story (Video)

    Steven was diagnosed with SMA when he was 3. Here's a look at his life today and why he says, "When someone tells you you can't do something, don't be afraid to try something new."

  • Splints

    A splint is a support device that keeps an injured area from moving. Doctors often use splints to hold bones and joints in place so they can heal after a fracture.

  • Strains and Sprains

    Sprains and strains are common injuries, especially for people who play hard or are into sports. Find out what they are and how to recuperate from one.

  • Stress Fractures

    It's not always easy to tell if you have a stress fracture, and stress fractures can get worse quickly. This article explains how to prevent and treat them.

  • What Causes Muscle Twitches?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • What Happens in ACL Surgery?

    If you tore your ACL, you might need this surgery to fix it. Find out what's involved.

  • What to Expect When Your Cast Comes Off

    You probably can't wait to get back to your normal activities, but it takes a while for a limb that's been in a cast to finish healing. Here's what to expect.

  • Cerebral Palsy

    Cerebral palsy is one of the most common developmental disabilities in the United States. It affects a person's ability to move and coordinate body movements.

  • Cerebral Palsy: Ira's Story (Video)

    Ira has cerebral palsy (CP), but it doesn't interfere with his love of sports or his dream of being a broadcaster. Check out this video.

  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complicated disease for doctors to diagnose — and even fully understand. Find out more about this often misunderstood condition.

  • Concussions

    In a concussion, the brain shifts inside the skull. This can cause a sudden - but usually temporary - disruption in a person's ability to function properly and feel well. Here's what to do if you suspect a concussion.

  • Concussions: Alex's Story

    Alex plays high school football, track, basketball, and lacrosse. He's had two concussions. Here, he talks about his experience and what he learned.

  • Concussions: Getting Better

    All body parts take time to heal, even brains.This article for teens has tips on what doctors often recommend to help people heal from a concussion.

  • Epilepsy

    Seizures are a common symptom of epilepsy, a condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Learn all about epilepsy, including what to do if you see someone having a seizure.

  • Fainting

    Fainting is pretty common in teens. The good news is that most of the time it's not a sign of something serious.

  • Headaches

    Almost everyone gets headaches. So how do you know if a headache is just a passing pain or something more?

  • How Can I Prevent Lyme Disease?

    Does the thought of Lyme disease make you worry about enjoying the great outdoors? Here's some information to help you lower your risk for Lyme disease.

  • Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease can be treated if it's caught early. Find out what causes it, how it's treated, and how to prevent it.

  • Migraine Headaches

    If you've ever had a migraine, you know that these headaches can cause severe pain and other symptoms. Read about migraine causes, treatments, prevention tips, and lots more.

  • School and Concussions

    A concussion can affect you at school because it's a type of brain injury. Doing schoolwork and being in a classroom can sometimes make things worse. Here's what to know about school and concussions.

  • Sports and Concussions

    As long as people play sports, there will be concussions from time to time. Find out how to protect yourself and what to do if you get a concussion playing sports.

  • Strokes

    Strokes are more common in older adults, but teens can have one too. This "brain attack" happens when blood flow to the brain stops, even for a second.

  • Tics

    A tic is a sudden, repetitive movement or sound that some people make, which can be difficult to control.

  • Tourette Syndrome

    Tourette syndrome affects the body's brain and nervous system by causing tics - repeated, uncontrollable movements or involuntary vocal sounds.

  • Why Do People Get Depressed?

    There's no one reason why people get depressed - many different things can play a role. Find out more about the things that can trigger depression.

  • Why Wear a Helmet If It Can't Prevent Concussions?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Can I Have Children After Cancer Treatments?

    When chemotherapy and other treatments attack cancer cells, they can affect some of the body's healthy cells too. As a teen, you'll want to know what this can mean to your fertility.

  • Cancer Basics

    Get the basics on cancer and cancer treatments in this article.

  • Chemotherapy

    Chemotherapy (chemo) is treatment with medicines that stop the growth of cancer cells. Find out how chemo works and what to expect when getting treatment.

  • Dealing With Cancer

    It's unusual for teens to have cancer, but it can happen. The good news is that most will survive and return to their everyday lives. Learn about how to cope if you or someone you know has cancer.

  • Melanoma

    Melanoma is different from other skin cancers because it can spread if it's not caught early. Find out how to lower your risk of getting melanoma and how doctors treat it.

  • My Friend Has Cancer. How Can I Help?

    It's hard to know how to respond when someone you love — someone your own age — is diagnosed with cancer. Here are some thoughts on dealing with feelings and helping your friend.

  • Radiation Therapy

    More than half of all people with cancer are treated with radiation therapy. Get the facts on radiation therapy, including what it is, what to expect, and how to cope with side effects.

  • Stem Cell Transplants

    Stem cells can develop into cells with different skills, so they're useful in treating diseases like cancer.

  • Steroids and Cancer Treatment

    If your doctor prescribed steroids as part of your treatment for an illness, don't worry. It's not the illegal, doping scandal kind of steroid. Get the details in this article for teens.

  • Celiac Disease

    People who have celiac disease, a disorder that makes their bodies react to gluten, can't eat certain kinds of foods. Find out more - including what foods are safe and where to find them.

  • Cholera

    Cholera is an intestinal infection that mostly affects people in tropical regions. Find out more about cholera in this article for teens.

  • Constipation

    Constipation is a very common problem that usually happens because a person's diet doesn't include enough fluids and fiber. In most cases, making simple changes can help you feel better.

  • Crohn's Disease

    Crohn's disease is a condition that causes parts of the intestine (bowel) to get red and swollen. It can be challenging to deal with, but many teens find that they're able to feel well and have few symptoms for long periods of time.

  • Cystic Fibrosis

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease that causes the body to produce mucus that's extremely thick and sticky. It mainly affects the lungs and the pancreas, causing serious breathing and digestive problems.

  • Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    Besides extra calories, teens with cystic fibrosis have some specific nutritional needs. Find out more.

  • Cystic Fibrosis: Sample Menu

    This sample meal plan for teens with cystic fibrosis provides a day's worth of meals that add up to about 3,750 calories.

  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease doesn't just affect old people who eat too much while watching TV. Active, healthy teens can have GERD too.

  • Hernias

    A hernia is an opening or weakness in the wall of a muscle, tissue, or membrane that normally holds an organ in place. Learning to prevent hernias isn't hard to do - check out these tips.

  • Indigestion

    Indigestion is just another name for an upset stomach. It usually happens when people eat too much or too fast, or have foods that don't agree with them.

  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an ongoing illness caused by an inflammation of the intestines. There are two kinds of IBD: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Some teens get stomachaches and diarrhea often. Read about irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a common intestinal disorder that affects the colon.

  • Lactose Intolerance

    If you have lactose intolerance, you're not alone. Lots of people have the condition. Check out these tips on dealing with lactose intolerance.

  • Stomachaches

    Lots of different problems can cause similar kinds of stomach pain - not all of them related to the digestive system. Here are some clues about what could be going on.

  • Ulcerative Colitis

    Ulcerative colitis is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that happens only in the colon. It causes the inner lining of the colon to get red and swollen with sores called ulcers.

  • Ulcers

    Peptic ulcers are common, but mostly affect adults. Most can be cured.

  • Upper GI (Video)

    See what it's like to get an upper GI test.

  • Albinism

    Humans, animals, and even plants can have albinism, a condition that gives people a kind of pale appearance. Find out more about albinism here.

  • Dwarfism

    A dwarf is a short-statured person whose adult height is 4 feet 10 inches or under. Find out what happens when a person has dwarfism and why some people are born with it.

  • Dwarfism: Emily's Story (Video)

    Emily was adopted from Russia, where she was born with a type of dwarfism. In this video, she talks about her life philosophy and how she overcame the many hurdles she faced.

  • Genes and Genetics

    Genes play an important role in how we look and act, and even in whether we get sick. This article gives the lowdown on genes, genetic disorders, and new research into gene therapy.

  • Klinefelter Syndrome

    This genetic condition only affects guys and is also called "XXY." It can affect a guy's ability to learn and his sexual development, but doctors can treat it. Find out more.

  • Metabolic Syndrome

    Metabolic syndrome is a signal that someone could be on the road to serious health problems. Find out more in this article for teens.

  • Turner Syndrome

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects about 1 in every 2,500 girls. Learn more about the condition and how doctors treat it.

  • von Willebrand Disease

    When people have Von Willebrand disease, their blood doesn't clot properly. Many teens with VWD have such mild symptoms that they never know they have it.

  • What Is Hypoglycemia?

    Lots of people wonder if they have hypoglycemia, but the condition is not common in teens. Get the facts on hypoglycemia.

  • Will I Pass Sickle Cell Disease on to My Children?

    Find out what the experts say.

  • Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

    The things you do now could help prevent diabetes later, depending on the type of diabetes. Here's the scoop on diabetes prevention.

  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complicated disease for doctors to diagnose — and even fully understand. Find out more about this often misunderstood condition.

  • Dwarfism

    A dwarf is a short-statured person whose adult height is 4 feet 10 inches or under. Find out what happens when a person has dwarfism and why some people are born with it.

  • Growth Problems

    In most cases, teens who are small are just physically maturing a bit more slowly than their friends. Occasionally, though, there's a medical reason why some kids and teens stop growing. Find out about growth problems and how doctors can help.

  • My Friend Has Diabetes. How Can I Help?

    Sure, you've heard of diabetes. But how much do you really know about what it's like to have it? Read our tips on helping a friend with diabetes.

  • Type 1 Diabetes: How Is It Treated?

    People with type 1 diabetes need to follow a treatment plan to manage their diabetes and stay healthy and active.

  • Type 2 Diabetes: How Is It Treated?

    People with type 2 diabetes need to follow a plan to manage their diabetes and stay healthy and active.

  • What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

    Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose, a sugar that is the body's main source of fuel. In type 1 diabetes, glucose can't get into the body's cells where it's needed.

  • What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

    Teens with type 2 diabetes have to pay close attention to what they eat and do.

  • Arrhythmias

    Arrhythmias are abnormal heartbeats usually caused by an electrical "short circuit" in the heart. Many are minor and not a significant health threat, but others can indicate a more serious problem.

  • Atrial Septal Defect

    Atrial septal defect, or ASD, is a heart defect that some people are born with. Most ASDs are diagnosed and treated successfully with few or no complications.

  • Coarctation of the Aorta

    When someone has coarctation of the aorta, that person's aorta (the major blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart to the body) is narrowed at some point.

  • Echocardiogram

    An echocardiogram (also called an echo or cardiac ultrasound) uses sound waves to create pictures of the heart. See why doctors might order this test for teens.

  • EKG (Video)

    This video shows what it's like to have an electrocardiogram (EKG for short).

  • Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, is more common in adults, but it can happen at any age. Learn what it is and how to treat it.

  • Ventricular Septal Defect

    Ventricular septal defect, or VSD, is a heart condition that a few teens can have. Find out what it is, how it happens, and what doctors do to correct it.

  • Bedwetting (Nocturnal Enuresis)

    Bedwetting can be embarrassing and upsetting for teens, but there are effective ways to correct the problem and scientists are constantly developing new treatments.

  • Blood in the Urine (Hematuria)

    Hematuria is pretty common, and most of the time it's not serious. Find out what causes blood in the urine and what to do about it.

  • Dialysis

    Dialysis is a medical treatment that can take over the job of filtering the blood until a person's failing kidneys heal or are replaced with a kidney transplant. Find out more in this article for teens.

  • Glomerulonephritis

    With glomerulonephritis, tiny filtering units in the kidneys stop working properly, causing problems like too much fluid in the body and swelling. Most of the time it can be treated. Find out more.

  • Hemodialysis

    Hemodialysis is the type of kidney dialysis that doctors use most to take over the kidneys' job of filtering the blood. Find out more in this article for teens.

  • Kidney Disease

    Sometimes, the kidneys can't do their job properly. In teens, kidney disease is usually due to infections, structural issues, glomerulonephritis, or nephrotic syndrome.

  • Kidney Stones

    Kidney stones mostly happen to adults, but sometimes teens can get them. Find out what kidney stones are, how to treat them, and ways to help prevent them.

  • Kidney Transplant

    If the kidneys stop working, a person will need either dialysis or a transplant. Get the facts on kidney transplant in this article for teens.

  • Peritoneal Dialysis

    This medical treatment helps people with kidney failure. It can be done at home, often overnight, to take over the kidneys' job of filtering blood. Find out more in this article for teens.

  • Urinary Tract Infections

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons that teens visit a doctor. Learn about the symptoms of UTIs, how they're treated, and more in this article.

  • ADHD

    ADHD is a medical condition caused by brain differences that affect attention and behavior in specific ways. This article for teens has the basics on ADHD.

  • ADHD Medicines

    Medicine doesn’t cure ADHD. But it does help boost a person's ability to pay attention, slow down, and have more self-control. This article for teens has details on how ADHD medicines help.

  • ADHD: Tips to Try

    It takes time to learn to manage ADHD. These tips for teens can help with school and learning.

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Autism spectrum disorder can make communicating and interacting with other people difficult. Find out more.

  • Therapy for ADHD

    Therapy is part of the treatment for ADHD. This article is for teens who want to know what to expect from therapy and how it works for ADHD.

  • Understanding Dyslexia

    Dyslexia is a learning disability in which people have difficulty learning to read, even though they are smart enough and are motivated to learn. Learn more about dyslexia and how to deal with it.

  • Asthma

    Asthma is a lung condition that makes it hard to breathe. Learn all about asthma here.

  • Cystic Fibrosis

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease that causes the body to produce mucus that's extremely thick and sticky. It mainly affects the lungs and the pancreas, causing serious breathing and digestive problems.

  • Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    Besides extra calories, teens with cystic fibrosis have some specific nutritional needs. Find out more.

  • Dietary Tips for Teens With Cystic Fibrosis

    Teens with cystic fibrosis have some specific nutritional needs. Here's how they can meet those needs.

  • How to Use an Incentive Spirometer

    An incentive spirometer is a way to do breathing exercises to help with healing after surgery or to manage an illness. See how to use one.

  • Incentive Spirometer

    An incentive spirometer is a way to do breathing exercises to help with healing after surgery or to manage an illness. This article explains how incentive spirometry works.

  • X-Ray (Video)

    Watch what it's like to get an X-ray.

  • Canker Sores

    Canker sores are fairly common, and they usually go away on their own without treatment. Read this article for teens to find out more, including tips on what to do about the pain.

  • Gum Disease

    Gum disease doesn't just happen to people your grandparents' age - it can happen to teens too. Get the details here.

  • Peritonsillar Abscess

    A peritonsillar abscess is an area of pus-filled tissue at the back of the mouth, next to one of the tonsils. Find out how it happens and what to do.

  • What Are Impacted Wisdom Teeth?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • What Causes Bad Breath?

    Bad breath, or halitosis, can be a major problem, especially when you're about to snuggle with your sweetie or whisper a joke to your friend. The good news is that bad breath often can be easily prevented.

  • 5 Facts About Goal Setting

    Here are 5 practical tips on goal setting that can help make it easier to set and reach goals.

  • About Overweight and Obesity

    We use the words "oveweight" and "obese" a lot, but they actually have medical meanings. Find out how doctors diagnose these conditions and what they mean for a person's health.

  • Acanthosis Nigricans

    Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin that can be a sign of other medical conditions. Find out more.

  • Body Mass Index (BMI)

    One of the biggest questions guys and girls have as they grow and develop is whether they're the right weight. One place to start is by learning about body mass index, or BMI.

  • Cholesterol

    Cholesterol is a type of fat found in your blood. The body needs some cholesterol, but too much can be a problem. Discover more about cholesterol in this article for teens.

  • Dealing With Feelings When You're Overweight

    If a person is struggling with extra weight, it can add to the emotional ups and downs of being a teen. Get some tips on coping here.

  • Emotional Eating

    We've all eaten a whole bag of chips out of boredom or while cramming for a big test. Learn more about emotional eating, and how to manage it, in this article for teens.

  • Exercise Log

    Keeping an exercise log is a great way to stay motivated and reach exercise goals.

  • Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    There are several different types of weight loss surgeries. One type is gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy. Find out what's involved and who gets it in this article for teens.

  • How Can I Lose Weight Safely?

    Lots of people are unhappy with their present weight, but aren't sure how to change it - or even if they need to. Get the facts on weight loss here.

  • Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, is more common in adults, but it can happen at any age. Learn what it is and how to treat it.

  • Losing Weight: Brandon's Story (Video)

    Brandon, 17, has lost 70 pounds through better eating and exercise. In this video he talks about what inspired him and how he stayed on track.

  • Metabolic Syndrome

    Metabolic syndrome is a signal that someone could be on the road to serious health problems. Find out more in this article for teens.

  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the ovaries produce higher than normal amounts of certain hormones, which can interfere with egg development and release. Learn how doctors diagnose and treat PCOS.

  • Therapy and Weight Management

    Losing weight can feel like a challenge, no matter how much we want it. It can sometimes seem like our minds are working against us. That's where weight-management counselors can help.

  • Weight Loss Surgery

    Weight loss surgery works. But it's serious stuff, both physically and emotionally. Find out about two weight loss surgery options for teens.

  • Weight Management: Strength Training Exercises (Video)

    These videos guide teens through basic strength training exercises. Anyone can do these exercises, and they work well as part of a weight-loss plan.

  • What Can I Do About Overeating?

    See what the experts have to say.

  • What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

    Teens with type 2 diabetes have to pay close attention to what they eat and do.

  • When Being Overweight Is a Health Problem

    A couple of pounds of extra body fat are not a health risk for most people. But when people are severely overweight, it can cause health problems.

  • Why Exercise Is Wise

    Getting the right amount of exercise can rev up your energy levels and even help you to feel better emotionally. Find out why.

  • Will My Monthly Cycle Go Back to Normal With PCOS Treatment?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Concussions: Alex's Story

    Alex plays high school football, track, basketball, and lacrosse. He's had two concussions. Here, he talks about his experience and what he learned.

  • Dwarfism: Emily's Story (Video)

    Emily was adopted from Russia, where she was born with a type of dwarfism. In this video, she talks about her life philosophy and how she overcame the many hurdles she faced.

  • Knee Injury: Caroline's Story

    Caroline loved sports. But when an ongoing knee injury kept her from playing the sports she loved, she discovered new interests. Read her story.

  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Steven's Story (Video)

    Steven was diagnosed with SMA when he was 3. Here's a look at his life today and why he says, "When someone tells you you can't do something, don't be afraid to try something new."

  • Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB)

    If periods aren't regular it's usually because a girl's body is still developing. But sometimes, changes in blood flow can be a sign of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB).

  • Breast Exams

    It's rare for teen girls to have breast problems. But sometimes a doctor or nurse might think a breast exam is a good idea. Find out why, as well as what's involved in a breast exam.

  • Can Getting the HPV Vaccine Help If I Already Have Genital Warts?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Delayed Puberty

    Concerned about your growth or development? Puberty can be delayed for several reasons. Luckily, doctors usually can help teens with delayed puberty to develop more normally.

  • Endometriosis

    Endometriosis is when tissue that looks and acts like the lining of the uterus grows outside the uterus. Here's how doctors help people who have it.

  • Female Athlete Triad

    Female athlete triad is a combination of three conditions: disordered eating, amenorrhea (loss of a girl's period), and osteoporosis (a weakening of the bones).

  • How Do People Get AIDS?

    AIDS, or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is a disease where the body is unable to fight off many infectious diseases as it normally could. Find out how AIDS is spread and how to protect yourself against it.

  • Klinefelter Syndrome

    This genetic condition only affects guys and is also called "XXY." It can affect a guy's ability to learn and his sexual development, but doctors can treat it. Find out more.

  • Pelvic Exams

    A pelvic exam is where a doctor or nurse practitioner looks at a girl's reproductive organs (both outside and internally) and feels the uterus and ovaries to be sure everything's normal. Find out what's involved in this article for teens.

  • PMS, Cramps, and Irregular Periods

    Get the facts on which period problems are normal and which ones might indicate something's going on.

  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the ovaries produce higher than normal amounts of certain hormones, which can interfere with egg development and release. Learn how doctors diagnose and treat PCOS.

  • Testicular Injuries

    Serious testicular injuries are relatively uncommon, but testicular injury can be painful. Here's how you can protect yourself from injury.

  • Testicular Torsion

    This emergency condition happens when the spermatic cord gets twisted and cuts off blood supply, causing pain and swelling. Find out what to do in this article for teens.

  • Turner Syndrome

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects about 1 in every 2,500 girls. Learn more about the condition and how doctors treat it.

  • Varicocele

    A varicocele is an enlargement of the veins in the scrotum. Although there is no way to prevent a varicocele, it usually needs no special treatment.

  • Why Do My Testicles Ache?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Earbuds

    Earbuds are basically a tiny pair of speakers that go inside the ears. They're fine at low volumes, but they can cause permanent hearing loss if not used properly. Find out what's safe (and not) in this article for teens.

  • Eardrum Injuries

    Perforated eardrums can really hurt. And if you can't hear as well as usual, they can be scary. The good news is, most people who have them get all their hearing back eventually.

  • Hearing Aids

    Want to hear what's being said to you, by you, and about you? Find out how hearing aids help people with certain types of hearing loss.

  • How Can I Prevent Hearing Loss?

    Hearing loss (also called hearing impairment) makes it hard to hear or understand sounds. But you can do something about noise-induced hearing loss.

  • Speech Problems

    Do you know someone who stutters or has another speech disorder? Find out how speech disorders are treated, how you can help a friend or classmate cope, and lots more.

  • Styes

    A stye is a backed-up oil gland in the eyelid. Styes are usually easy to get rid of, but there are some things you can do to help. Learn more about styes.

  • Visual Impairment

    When one or more parts of the eye or brain that are needed to process images become diseased or damaged, severe or total loss of vision can occur. Read all about visual impairment.

  • Abscess

    People can get abscesses on the skin, under the skin, in a tooth, or even inside the body. Most abscesses are caused by infection, so it can help to know what to do. Find out in this article for teens.

  • Acanthosis Nigricans

    Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin that can be a sign of other medical conditions. Find out more.

  • Acne

    Almost every teen gets acne at some point. This article addresses common questions and concerns about acne and tells you what you can do about it.

  • Athlete's Foot

    Although the name athlete's foot sounds funny, if you have this skin infection, you're probably not laughing. The good news is that it is generally easy to treat.

  • Blisters, Calluses, and Corns

    Blisters, calluses, and corns can be uncomfortable, but they're also pretty common and easy to prevent. Find out what to do in this article for teens.

  • Bruises

    This article is all about bruises, including why they happen, how to make them go away faster, and why they turn all those funny colors.

  • Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    Scars from acne can seem like double punishment - first you had to suffer through the pimples, now you have marks to remind you. Is there anything you can do?

  • Cellulite

    Cellulite is the lumpy look ("cottage cheese") commonly found on the thighs, stomach, and butt. It's due to collections of fat that push against the connective tissue beneath the skin.

  • Cuts, Scratches, and Scrapes

    Most small cuts, scrapes, or abrasions heal on their own. Here are tips for teens on how to treat cuts at home - and when to get medical help.

  • Dandruff

    If you're worried about dandruff, you're not alone. Dandruff can start in puberty, and lots of teens and adults live with it. Learn how to control it.

  • Head Lice

    Lice aren't dangerous, but they do spread from person to person easily. They can also be hard to get rid of. Find out how to prevent lice -- and what to do if someone you know has them.

  • Hives (Urticaria)

    Hives cause raised red bumps or welts on the skin. They're pretty common and usually not serious. Find out what to do about hives in this article for teens.

  • I Got Blisters From a Sunburn. What Should I Do?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Ingrown Toenails

    A toenail is ingrown when it begins to break through and grow into the soft skin of the toe. Find out more about ingrown toenails.

  • Jock Itch

    Jock itch is a pretty common fungal infection of the groin and upper thighs. It is generally easy to treat - and avoid - by following a few simple steps.

  • Molluscum Contagiosum

    The skin rash molluscum contagiosum isn't a big deal. Find out what to do about it in this article for teens.

  • Pityriasis Rosea

    Pityriasis rosea is a pink or gray skin rash that's common in teens and young adults. It may itch, but it's harmless. Find out what to do about it in this article for teens.

  • Psoriasis

    Psoriasis causes skin cells to build up on the surface of the skin where they form itchy, red areas and thick scales. Find out how to deal with psoriasis, and what causes it, in this article for teens.

  • Ringworm

    Ringworm isn't a worm at all - it's the name for a type of fungal skin infection. The good news is that ringworm is easy to treat.

  • Vitiligo

    Vitiligo is a loss of skin pigment that causes white spots or patches to appear on the skin. It's not medically dangerous, but it can affect a person's appearance. Find out more.

  • What Can I Do About Acne?

    There's no sure way to prevent acne. But these tips might help reduce the number and severity of your breakouts.

  • What Can I Do About the Rough Skin on My Arms?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Wound Healing and Care

    How well a wound heals depends on where it is on the body and what caused it – as well as how well someone cares for the wound at home. Find out what to do in this article for teens.

What next?

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There are 10 nurses in the picture.

And we have many more pediatric primary care providers in Northeast Ohio. You can meet some of them here.
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The five differences are:
– Phone color
– Coat pocket
– Stethoscope earpiece color
– Stethoscope bell dot
– Clipboard paper color

Need help finding a doctor, choosing a location or getting a general question about Akron Children's answered? Call us or fill out the form and we'll help in any way we can.
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The two matching doctors are 9 and 14.

With virtual visits, you can see our pediatric experts from the comfort of home or wherever you are.
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The correct path:
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We offer many ways to get pediatric care all over Northeast Ohio. Use this page to find the right kind of care and the most convenient location for you.