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Sports Medicine Center

  • About Body Basics

    Remember the biology class you had in high school? Well, maybe you don't or maybe now that you have a child, your interest in how the body works has grown.

  • Blood Blood

    Blood is vital to bodily function. Read this article for the basics about blood, blood cells, blood diseases, and more.

  • Bones, Muscles, and Joints Bones, Muscles, and Joints

    Without bones, muscles, and joints, we couldn't stand, walk, run, or even sit. The musculoskeletal system supports our bodies, protects our organs from injury, and enables movement.

  • Brain and Nervous System Brain and Nervous System

    The brain controls everything we do, and is often likened to the central computer within a vast, complicated communication network, working at lightning speed.

  • Digestive System Digestive System

    The digestive process starts even before the first bite of food. Find out more about the digestive system and how our bodies break down and absorb the food we eat.

  • Endocrine System Endocrine System

    Although we rarely think about them, the glands of the endocrine system and the hormones they release influence almost every cell, organ, and function of our bodies.

  • Eyes Eyes

    The eyes are small compared with most of the body's other organs, but their structure is incredibly complex. Learn more about eyes, vision, and common problems with both.

  • Female Reproductive System Female Reproductive System

    Learning about the female reproductive system, what it does, and the problems that can affect it can help you better understand your daughter's reproductive health.

  • Heart and Circulatory System Heart and Circulatory System

    The heart and circulatory system are our body's lifeline, delivering blood to the body's tissues. Brush up on your ticker with this body basics article.

  • Immune System Immune System

    The immune system, composed of special cells, proteins, tissues, and organs that protect against germs and microorganisms, is the body's defense against disease.

  • Kidneys and Urinary Tract Kidneys and Urinary Tract

    The bean-shaped kidneys, each about the size of a child's fist, perform several functions essential to health. Their most important role is to filter blood and produce urine.

  • Lungs and Respiratory System Lungs and Respiratory System

    By the time we're 70 years old, we will have taken at least 600 million breaths. All of this breathing couldn't happen without the respiratory system.

  • Male Reproductive System Male Reproductive System

    Understanding the male reproductive system, what it does, and problems that can affect it can help you better understand your son's reproductive health.

  • Metabolism Metabolism

    Brush up on metabolism basics - including common metabolic disorders - in this article.

  • Mouth and Teeth Mouth and Teeth

    Our mouth and teeth play an important role in our daily lives. Here's a course on the basics - including common problems of the mouth and teeth.

  • Skin, Hair, and Nails Skin, Hair, and Nails

    Our skin protects the network of tissues, muscles, bones, nerves, blood vessels, and everything else inside our bodies. Hair and nails are actually modified types of skin.

  • Spleen and Lymphatic System Spleen and Lymphatic System

    The lymphatic system is an extensive drainage network that helps keep bodily fluid levels in balance and defends the body against infections.

  • Sports Medicine Center Sports Medicine Center

    Get tips on everything from finding the best sport for your kids to preventing and handling injuries.

  • Sports Physicals Sports Physicals

    Just as professional sports stars need medical care to keep them playing their best, so do student athletes. That's why it's important to make sure that kids and teens get a sports physical.

  • A to Z: Head Injury A to Z: Head Injury

    Learn more about head injuries (head trauma).

  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    ACL injuries - which can happen in active and athletic kids - happen when excessive pressure is put on the knee joint, resulting in a torn ligament.

  • Broken Bones Broken Bones

    Although many kids will have one at some point, a broken bone can be scary for them and parents alike. Here's the lowdown on what to expect.

  • Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains

    Broken bones and torn muscles, ligaments, and tendons happen. Find out what to do if your child experiences any breaks, strains, or sprains.

  • Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions

    Flatfeet, toe walking, pigeon toes, bowlegs, and knock-knees. Lots of kids have these common orthopedic conditions, but are they medical problems that can and should be corrected?

  • Concussions Concussions

    The term concussion conjures up the image of a child knocked unconscious while playing sports. But concussions can happen with any head injury, often without any loss of consciousness.

  • Concussions: What Parents and Coaches Say Concussions: What Parents and Coaches Say

    We asked coaches and parents if they're following the latest rules on kids and concussions. See what they said.

  • Dehydration Dehydration

    Sometimes kids lose fluids and salts through fever, diarrhea, vomiting, or sweating. Here are some tips on preventing or treating dehydration.

  • Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

    Babies are born with this hip deformity or develop it soon after birth. With early treatent, kids can avoid long-term hip problems.

  • Ear Injuries Ear Injuries

    Ear injuries not only can affect a child's hearing, but sense of balance, too. That's because our ears also help keep us steady on our feet.

  • Exercise-Induced Asthma Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Many kids with asthma have symptoms when they exercise. But with careful management, they usually can do anything their peers can do.

  • Eye Injuries Eye Injuries

    You can treat many minor eye irritations by flushing the eye, but more serious injuries require medical attention.

  • First Aid: Broken Bones First Aid: Broken Bones

    A broken bone requires emergency medical care. Here's what to do if you think your child just broke a bone.

  • First Aid: Cuts First Aid: Cuts

    Most cuts can be safely treated at home. But deeper cuts - or any wounds that won't stop bleeding - need emergency medical treatment.

  • First Aid: Dehydration First Aid: Dehydration

    Kids can become dehydrated when their bodies lose very large amounts of fluids. It's important to replenish fluid losses as quickly as possible.

  • First Aid: Dislocations First Aid: Dislocations

    A dislocation happens when two connected bones are separated. These injuries require emergency medical care to avoid further damage.

  • First Aid: Eye Injuries First Aid: Eye Injuries

    Some eye injuries can be treated at home, while others require a visit to the doctor or emergency room. Find out what to do if your child has eye pain.

  • First Aid: Falls First Aid: Falls

    Although most result in mild bumps and bruises, some falls can cause serious injuries that need medical attention.

  • First Aid: Head Injuries First Aid: Head Injuries

    Learn about the different types of head injuries, and find out what to do if your child is seriously injuried.

  • First Aid: Heat Illness First Aid: Heat Illness

    In hot weather, a child's internal temperature can rise and cause heat exhaustion, which can progress to heatstroke if not treated quickly.

  • First Aid: Nosebleeds First Aid: Nosebleeds

    Although they can be serious, nosebleeds are common in children ages 3 to 10 years and most stop on their own.

  • First Aid: Strains and Sprains First Aid: Strains and Sprains

    Here's what to do if you think your child has pulled or torn a muscle, ligament or tendon.

  • First Aid: Teeth Injuries First Aid: Teeth Injuries

    If your child loses a baby tooth, there's no need to replace it. But if a permanent tooth is dislodged, it's a dental emergency. Here's what to do.

  • Frequently Asked Questions About Casts Frequently Asked Questions About Casts

    Getting a cast often comes with plenty of questions. Read on for answers to some frequent inquiries many parents - and kids - may have about casts.

  • Growing Pains Growing Pains

    Does your child sometimes wake up crying in the middle of the night complaining of throbbing leg pain? It could be growing pains.

  • Growth Plate Injuries Growth Plate Injuries

    Injuries to growth plates, which produce new bone tissue and determine the final length and shape of bones in adulthood, must be treated so that bones heal properly.

  • Head Injuries Head Injuries

    Head injuries fall into two categories: external and internal. Learn more about both kinds, how to prevent them, and what to do if your child is injured.

  • Heat Illness Heat Illness

    Active kids can be at risk for heat illness, which can result in heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heatstroke. Learn how to prevent and treat heat illness.

  • How Long Will It Take to Heal a Broken Bone? How Long Will It Take to Heal a Broken Bone?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • In-toeing & Out-toeing in Toddlers In-toeing & Out-toeing in Toddlers

    What is in-toeing and how will it affect your child? Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis) Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis)

    A joint aspiration (arthrocentesis) involves withdrawing (aspirating) a sample of fluid from a joint using a needle and syringe.

  • Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    Jumper's knee is an inflammation or injury of the patellar tendon. Although it can seem minor, it's actually a serious condition that can get worse over time and ultimately require surgery if not treated.

  • Knee Injuries Knee Injuries

    Knee injuries are common among young athletes. Learn about causes, treatments, and prevention.

  • Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MCL injuries can happen in active and athletic kids, when excessive pressure is put on the knee joint, resulting in a torn ligament.

  • Nosebleeds Nosebleeds

    A nosebleed can be scary, but it's rarely cause for alarm. Here's how to handle one at home.

  • Osgood-Schlatter Disease Osgood-Schlatter Disease

    Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD) is one of the most common causes of knee pain in adolescents. It's really not a disease, but an overuse injury.

  • Panner's Disease Panner's Disease

    Panner's disease is a rare but painful bone condition linked to overuse of the elbow. Even though recovery can be slow, the condition usually doesn't cause any long-term problems.

  • Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    Participation in sports can teach kids sportsmanship and discipline. But sports also carry the potential for injury. Here's how to protect your kids.

  • Sever's Disease Sever's Disease

    Sever's disease, a common heel injury in kids, is due to inflammation (swelling) of the growth plate in the heel. While painful, it's only temporary and has no long-term effects.

  • Sports, Exercise, and Diabetes Sports, Exercise, and Diabetes

    Diabetes doesn't have to get in the way of exercise and sports competition. Like anyone else, kids with diabetes are healthier if they get plenty of exercise.

  • Torticollis Torticollis

    Torticollis is a common condition that causes a stiff neck or neck pain that makes it difficult for kids to turn their heads.

  • X-Ray Exam: Ankle X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    An ankle X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as pain, tenderness, and swelling, or deformity of the ankle joint. It can also detect broken bones or a dislocated joint.

  • X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study

    A bone age study can help evaluate how a child's skeleton is maturing, which can help doctors diagnose conditions that delay or accelerate growth.

  • X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    This X-ray can, among other things, help find the cause of neck, shoulder, upper back, or arm pain. It's commonly done after someone has been in an automobile or other accident.

  • X-Ray Exam: Elbow X-Ray Exam: Elbow

    An elbow X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as pain, tenderness, swelling, or a deformity. It can also help to detect broken bones or a dislocated joint.

  • X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    A femur X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as pain, limp, tenderness, swelling, or deformity of the upper leg. It can detect a broken bone, and after a broken bone has been set, it can help determine whether the bone is in alignment.

  • X-Ray Exam: Finger X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Doctors may order a finger X-ray to find the cause of symptoms such as pain, tenderness, or swelling, or to detect broken bones or dislocated joints.

  • X-Ray Exam: Foot X-Ray Exam: Foot

    A foot X-ray can help find the cause pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformities. It also can detect broken bones or dislocated joints.

  • X-Ray Exam: Hand X-Ray Exam: Hand

    A hand X-ray can help find the cause of pain, tenderness, swelling, and deformity. It also can detect broken bones or dislocated joints.

  • X-Ray Exam: Hip X-Ray Exam: Hip

    A hip X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as limping, pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformity in the hip area. It can detect broken bones or a dislocated joint.

  • X-Ray Exam: Humerus (Upper Arm) X-Ray Exam: Humerus (Upper Arm)

    A humerus X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformity of the upper arm. It can detect a broken bone, and after the bone has been set, help determine whether it has healed properly.

  • X-Ray Exam: Knee X-Ray Exam: Knee

    A knee X-ray can help find the causes of pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformity of the knee, and detect broken bones or a dislocated joint.

  • X-Ray Exam: Leg Length X-Ray Exam: Leg Length

    Some kids may have significant differences in the length of their legs, a condition known as leg length discrepancy. This X-ray exam can help doctors determine the exact difference in leg length so they can decide on a treatment.

  • X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula) X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula)

    An X-ray of the tibia and fibula can help find the cause of pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformity of the lower leg. It can detect broken bones, and after a broken bone has been set, help determine if it has healed properly.

  • X-Ray Exam: Pelvis X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    A pelvis X-ray can help find the cause pain, swelling, or deformity in the pelvic, hip, or upper leg regions, and can detect broken bones.

  • X-Ray Exam: Wrist X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that can help find the cause of pain, tenderness, swelling, or show deformities of the wrist joint. It can also detect broken bones or dislocated joints.

  • Competitive Sports: Helping Kids Play it Cool Competitive Sports: Helping Kids Play it Cool

    Sometimes the pressure to succeed on the field or in the court can be overwhelming. Learn what you can do to help your child keeps things in perspective.

  • Compulsive Exercise Compulsive Exercise

    Even though exercise has many positive benefits, too much can be harmful. Teens who exercise compulsively are at risk for both physical and psychological problems.

  • Signing Kids Up for Sports Signing Kids Up for Sports

    Organized sports can help kids grow in many ways. Consider your child's age, personality, and abilities to help make sports participation a positive experience.

  • Sportsmanship Sportsmanship

    One of the most important goals of kids' sports is helping children develop a sense of good sportsmanship. Here's how to set a good example for your kids.

  • Steroids Steroids

    Get the facts about steroids, their side effects, and what can drive kids and teens to try them.

  • Bike Safety Bike Safety

    Bike riding is a great way to get exercise and fresh air and share time as a family. But there's an important factor that you need to consider - safety.

  • Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    Tired of being cooped up in the house because of the cold weather? Get out in the snow and try a new sport with your family this winter!

  • Finding the Right Bike Finding the Right Bike

    As kids grow, there are a variety of options for bicycling, from trailers to child seats to independent riding. With a bike that's safe and fits well, kids can learn to love cycling!

  • Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    Participation in sports can teach kids sportsmanship and discipline. But sports also carry the potential for injury. Here's how to protect your kids.

  • Quiz: Baseball Injuries Quiz: Baseball Injuries

    How much do you know about baseball injuries? Test your knowledge here.

  • Safety Tips: Baseball Safety Tips: Baseball

    Baseball is by no means a dangerous sport. But it can present a very real risk of injuries from things like wild pitches, batted balls, and collisions in the field. These safety tips can help keep your kids safe on the diamond.

  • Safety Tips: Basketball Safety Tips: Basketball

    It may be fun to play and great exercise, but basketball is also a contact sport, and injuries occur frequently. To help your kids stay safe on the basketball court, take a look at these safety tips.

  • Safety Tips: Hockey Safety Tips: Hockey

    As fun as it is, ice hockey carries a very real risk of injury. To keep your kids as safe as possible, follow these tips.

  • Safety Tips: Skateboarding Safety Tips: Skateboarding

    Skateboarding is undeniably cool, but it's also easy for riders to get hurt. Help your kids keep it safe with these safety tips.

  • Safety Tips: Skiing Safety Tips: Skiing

    Skiing is fun but also has some very real dangers. Make sure your kids follow these safety tips to learn how to stay safe on the slopes.

  • Safety Tips: Sledding Safety Tips: Sledding

    Sledding is a lot of fun, but can also cause injuries, some of them pretty serious. To keep your kids safe while sledding, make sure they follow these safety tips.

  • Safety Tips: Snowboarding Safety Tips: Snowboarding

    Snowboarding is a great way for kids to have fun and get exercise, but it has some very real dangers. These safety tips can help keep your kids safe on the slopes.

  • Calcium Calcium

    Milk and other calcium-rich foods help build strong, healthy bones. But most kids and teens don't get enough calcium. Here's how to make sure that yours do.

  • Competitive Sports: Helping Kids Play it Cool Competitive Sports: Helping Kids Play it Cool

    Sometimes the pressure to succeed on the field or in the court can be overwhelming. Learn what you can do to help your child keeps things in perspective.

  • Exercising During Pregnancy Exercising During Pregnancy

    Most women benefit greatly from exercising throughout their pregnancies. But during that time, you'll need to make a few adjustments to your normal exercise routine.

  • Feeding Your Child Athlete Feeding Your Child Athlete

    All kids need to eat balanced meals and have a healthy diet. But should that balance change for kids who play on a sports team or work out?

  • Fitness and Your 13- to 18-Year-Old Fitness and Your 13- to 18-Year-Old

    Kids who enjoy exercise tend to stay active throughout their lives. Learn how to encourage fitness in your teen.

  • Fitness and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old Fitness and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old

    Kids this age are naturally active, so be sure to provide lots of opportunities for your child to practice basic skills, such as running, kicking, and throwing.

  • Fitness and Your 4- to 5-Year-Old Fitness and Your 4- to 5-Year-Old

    Take advantage of your child's natural tendency to be active. Staying fit can help improve kids' self-esteem and decrease the risk of serious illnesses later in life.

  • Fitness and Your 6- to 12-Year-Old Fitness and Your 6- to 12-Year-Old

    School-age kids need physical activity to build strength, coordination, confidence, and to lay the groundwork for a healthy lifestyle.

  • Fitness for Kids Who Don't Like Sports Fitness for Kids Who Don't Like Sports

    Some kids aren't natural athletes and they may say they just don't like sports. What then?

  • Kids and Exercise Kids and Exercise

    Besides enjoying the health benefits of regular exercise, kids who are physically fit are better able to handle physical and emotional challenges.

  • Motivating Kids to Be Active Motivating Kids to Be Active

    Parents can help instill a love of activity and help kids make it a part of their everyday routine.

  • Motivating Preschoolers to Be Active Motivating Preschoolers to Be Active

    A preschooler's desire to move, move, move makes this a great time to encourage fitness habits that can last a lifetime.

  • Motivating School-Age Kids to Be Active Motivating School-Age Kids to Be Active

    Being active is a key component of good health for all school-age kids. So how do you get kids motivated to be active, especially those who aren't gifted athletes?

  • Nutrition & Fitness Center Nutrition & Fitness Center

    You know the importance of exercising and eating nutritious foods, but do you know how to raise a healthy and active child? Get practical advice and tips.

  • Physical Therapy Physical Therapy

    Doctors often recommend physical therapy for kids who have been injured or have movement problems from an illness, disease, or disability. Learn more about PT.

  • Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    Participation in sports can teach kids sportsmanship and discipline. But sports also carry the potential for injury. Here's how to protect your kids.

  • Sports and Energy Drinks: Should Your Child Drink Them? Sports and Energy Drinks: Should Your Child Drink Them?

    When it comes to keeping your kid hydrated, there's a dizzying array of drinks to choose from. Are sports and energy drinks right for your child?

  • Sports, Exercise, and Diabetes Sports, Exercise, and Diabetes

    Diabetes doesn't have to get in the way of exercise and sports competition. Like anyone else, kids with diabetes are healthier if they get plenty of exercise.

  • Steroids Steroids

    Get the facts about steroids, their side effects, and what can drive kids and teens to try them.

  • Strength Training Strength Training

    With a properly designed and supervised program, strength training can be a fun way for kids to build healthy muscles, joints, and bones.

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