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Sports Medicine Center Content List

  • About Body Basics

    Remember the biology class you had in high school? Well, maybe you don't or maybe now that you have a child, your interest in how the body works has grown.

  • The Lymphatic System

    The lymphatic system is an extensive drainage network that helps keep bodily fluid levels in balance and defends the body against infections.

  • Sports Physicals

    Just as professional sports stars need medical care to keep them playing their best, so do student athletes. That's why it's important to make sure that kids and teens get a sports physical.

  • When Kids Want to Quit a Sport

    What should parents do when their child wants to quit a sport?

  • A to Z: Head Injury

    Learn more about head injuries (head trauma).

  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tears

    ACL injuries can happen in active and athletic kids when excessive pressure is put on the knee joint, resulting in a torn ligament.

  • Broken Bones

    Many kids will have a broken bone at some point. Here's what to expect.

  • Broken Collarbone (Clavicle Fracture)

    Learn about broken collarbones (or clavicle fractures), a common sports injury in kids.

  • Burners and Stingers

    Burners (or stingers) are injuries to the nerve network in the shoulder, arm, forearm, hand, and fingers. They're pretty common in sports and usually go away quickly.

  • Concussions

    Concussions are serious injuries that can be even more serious if kids don't get the time and rest needed to heal them completely.

  • Dehydration

    Sometimes kids lose fluids and salts through fever, diarrhea, vomiting, or sweating. Here are some tips on preventing or treating dehydration.

  • Dislocated Kneecap (Dislocated Patella)

    A dislocated kneecap is when the bone in the front of the knee (the kneecap or patella) slides out of place. A person with a dislocated kneecap needs care at the hospital right away.

  • Ear Injuries

    Ear injuries not only can affect a child's hearing, but sense of balance too. That's because our ears also help keep us steady on our feet.

  • Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Many kids with asthma have symptoms when they exercise. But with careful management, they usually can do anything their peers can do.

  • First Aid: Broken Bones

    A broken bone needs emergency medical care. Here's what to do if you think your child just broke a bone.

  • First Aid: Cuts

    Most cuts can be safely treated at home. But deeper cuts - or any wounds that won't stop bleeding - need emergency medical treatment.

  • First Aid: Dehydration

    Kids can become dehydrated when their bodies lose very large amounts of fluids. It's important to replenish fluid losses as quickly as possible.

  • First Aid: Dislocations

    A dislocation happens when two connected bones are separated. These injuries require emergency medical care to avoid further damage.

  • First Aid: Eye Injuries

    Some eye injuries can be treated at home, while others require a visit to the doctor or emergency room. Find out what to do if your child has eye pain.

  • First Aid: Falls

    Although most result in mild bumps and bruises, some falls can cause serious injuries that need medical attention.

  • First Aid: Head Injuries

    Learn about the different types of head injuries, and find out what to do if your child is seriously injuried.

  • First Aid: Heat Illness

    In hot weather, a child's internal temperature can rise and cause heat exhaustion, which can progress to heatstroke if not treated quickly.

  • First Aid: Nosebleeds

    Although they can be serious, nosebleeds are common in children ages 3 to 10 years and most stop on their own.

  • First Aid: Strains and Sprains

    Here's what to do if you think your child has pulled or torn a muscle, ligament, or tendon.

  • First Aid: Teeth Injuries

    If your child loses a baby tooth, there's no need to replace it. But if a permanent tooth is dislodged, it's a dental emergency. Here's what to do.

  • Growing Pains

    Growing pains are leg pains and soreness that happen to kids at night, usually when they're 3 to 12 years old.

  • Growth Plate Fractures

    Injuries to growth plates, which produce new bone tissue and determine the final length and shape of bones in adulthood, must be treated so that bones heal properly.

  • Head Injuries

    Head injuries can be external or internal. Learn more about both kinds, how to prevent them, and what to do if your child is injured.

  • Heat Illness

    Active kids can be at risk for heat illness, which can result in heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heatstroke. Learn how to prevent and treat heat illness.

  • How Being Active Helps Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

    Diabetes doesn't have to get in the way of exercise and sports competition. Like anyone else, kids with diabetes are healthier if they get plenty of exercise.

  • How Long Does it Take for a Broken Bone to Heal?

    How long does a broken bone take to heal? Find out!

  • Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis)

    A joint aspiration (arthrocentesis) involves withdrawing (aspirating) a sample of fluid from a joint using a needle and syringe.

  • Jumper's Knee

    Jumper's knee is an overuse injury that happens when frequent jumping, running, and changing direction damages the patellar tendon.

  • Knee Injuries

    Knee injuries are common among young athletes. Learn about causes, treatments, and prevention.

  • Little League Elbow

    Little League elbow is an overuse injury to the elbow caused by repetitive throwing. Most cases happen in pitchers, but any young athlete who throws a lot can get the condition.

  • Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MCL injuries can happen in active and athletic kids, when excessive pressure is put on the knee joint, resulting in a torn ligament.

  • Nosebleeds

    A nosebleed can be scary, but it's rarely cause for alarm. Here's how to handle one at home.

  • Osgood-Schlatter Disease

    Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD) is one of the most common causes of knee pain in adolescents. It's really not a disease, but an overuse injury.

  • Panner's Disease

    Panner's disease is a painful bone condition linked to overuse of the elbow. Kids with Panner's disease need to avoid all activities that cause pain so the bone can heal.

  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner's Knee)

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (or runner's knee) is the most common overuse injury among runners, but it can also happen to other athletes who do activities that require a lot of knee bending.

  • Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    Participation in sports can teach kids sportsmanship and discipline. But sports also carry the potential for injury. Here's how to protect your kids.

  • Preventing Eye Injuries

    Eye injuries in kids can lead to serious vision problems, even blindness. Wearing protective eyewear can prevent most eye injuries.

  • Repetitive Stress Injuries in Sports

    Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) happen when movements are repeated over and over, damaging a bone, tendon, or joint.

  • Sever's Disease

    Sever's disease, a common heel injury in kids, is due to inflammation (swelling) of the growth plate in the heel. While painful, it's only temporary and has no long-term effects.

  • Shin Splints

    Shin splints are pain on the inner part of the shinbone, often from running or another high-impact activity. They get better with rest.

  • Torticollis

    Torticollis is a common condition that causes a stiff neck or neck pain that makes it difficult for kids to turn their heads.

  • Competitive Sports: Helping Kids Play it Cool

    Sometimes the pressure to succeed on the field or in the court can be overwhelming. Learn what you can do to help your child keeps things in perspective.

  • Compulsive Exercise

    Even though exercise has many positive benefits, too much can be harmful. Teens who exercise compulsively are at risk for both physical and psychological problems.

  • Signing Kids Up for Sports

    Organized sports can help kids grow in many ways. Consider your child's age, personality, and abilities to help make sports fun.

  • Sportsmanship

    One of the most important goals of kids' sports is helping children develop a sense of good sportsmanship. Here's how to set a good example for your kids.

  • Steroids

    Get the facts about steroids, their side effects, and what can drive kids and teens to try them.

  • Bike Safety

    Bike riding is a great way to get exercise and share time as a family. But there's an important factor that you need to consider - safety.

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19): Sports & Activities

    As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, it’s important to know how to protect active kids and young athletes.

  • How Can Parents Help Prevent Concussions?

    Concussions are serious injuries. Here's how to help protect kids and teens from these mild traumatic brain injuries.

  • Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    Participation in sports can teach kids sportsmanship and discipline. But sports also carry the potential for injury. Here's how to protect your kids.

  • Safety Tips: Baseball

    Baseball is by no means a dangerous sport. But it can present a very real risk of injuries from things like wild pitches, batted balls, and collisions in the field. These safety tips can help keep your kids safe on the diamond.

  • Safety Tips: Basketball

    Basketball is fun - but it's also a contact sport, and injuries happen. To help your kids stay safe on the basketball court, take a look at these safety tips.

  • Safety Tips: Football

    Football is a lot of fun, but injuries are common. To keep things as safe as possible on the gridiron, players should follow these tips.

  • Safety Tips: Hockey

    As fun as it is, ice hockey carries a very real risk of injury. To keep your kids as safe as possible, follow these tips.

  • Safety Tips: Lacrosse

    Lacrosse is a fast-moving, fun sport to play and watch. But injuries are bound to happen. Here's how to help players avoid them.

  • Safety Tips: Running

    Injuries can be common, and runners should always be aware of their surroundings. These tips can help keep runners safe.

  • Safety Tips: Skateboarding

    Skateboarding is undeniably cool, but it's also easy for riders to get hurt. Help your kids keep it safe with these safety tips.

  • Safety Tips: Skiing

    Skiing is fun but also has some very real dangers. Make sure your kids follow these safety tips to learn how to stay safe on the slopes.

  • Safety Tips: Sledding

    Sledding is a lot of fun, but can also cause injuries, some of them pretty serious. To keep your kids safe while sledding, make sure they follow these safety tips.

  • Safety Tips: Snowboarding

    Snowboarding is a great way to have fun and get exercise, but it has some very real dangers. These safety tips can help keep your family safe on the slopes.

  • Safety Tips: Wrestling

    In wrestling, injuries are bound to happen sometimes. To keep things as safe as possible, wrestlers should follow these tips

  • Calcium

    Milk and other calcium-rich foods help build strong, healthy bones. But most kids and teens don't get enough calcium. Here's how to make sure that yours do.

  • Competitive Sports: Helping Kids Play it Cool

    Sometimes the pressure to succeed on the field or in the court can be overwhelming. Learn what you can do to help your child keeps things in perspective.

  • Feeding Your Child Athlete

    All kids need to eat balanced meals and have a healthy diet. But should that balance change for kids who play on a sports team or work out?

  • Fitness and Your 13- to 18-Year-Old

    Kids who enjoy exercise tend to stay active throughout their lives. Learn how to encourage fitness in your teen.

  • Fitness and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old

    Kids this age are naturally active, so be sure to provide lots of opportunities for your child to practice basic skills, such as running, kicking, and throwing.

  • Fitness and Your 3- to 5-Year-Old

    Take advantage of your child's natural tendency to be active. Staying fit can help improve kids' self-esteem and decrease the risk of serious illnesses later in life.

  • Fitness and Your 6- to 12-Year-Old

    School-age kids need physical activity to build strength, coordination, confidence, and to lay the groundwork for a healthy lifestyle.

  • Fitness for Kids Who Don't Like Sports

    Some kids aren't natural athletes and they may say they just don't like sports. What then?

  • How Being Active Helps Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

    Diabetes doesn't have to get in the way of exercise and sports competition. Like anyone else, kids with diabetes are healthier if they get plenty of exercise.

  • Kids and Exercise

    Besides enjoying the health benefits of regular exercise, kids who are physically fit are better able to handle physical and emotional challenges.

  • Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    Participation in sports can teach kids sportsmanship and discipline. But sports also carry the potential for injury. Here's how to protect your kids.

  • Safety Tips: Wrestling

    In wrestling, injuries are bound to happen sometimes. To keep things as safe as possible, wrestlers should follow these tips

  • Sports Drinks and Energy Drinks

    When it comes to keeping your kid hydrated, there's a dizzying array of drinks to choose from. Are sports and energy drinks right for your child?

  • Sports Supplements

    Sports supplements are products used to enhance athletic performance. But there aren't enough long-term studies to know if they're safe for teens.

  • Steroids

    Get the facts about steroids, their side effects, and what can drive kids and teens to try them.

  • Strength Training

    With a properly designed and supervised program, strength training can be a fun way for kids to build healthy muscles, joints, and bones.

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