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Department Main Image

Overview

We are ranked among the best children's hospitals in the country for pediatric neurology and neurosurgery, according to U.S. News & World Report. At our NeuroDevelopmental Science Center (NDSC), we bring together 5 pediatric specialties under one roof to deliver the best outcomes and quality of life for children and families affected by neurological and developmental disorders.

We are dedicated to easing the circumstances each step of the way, from referral to diagnosis to treatment. Our goal is to provide care that enriches you and your child's quality of life.

Our center includes pediatric experts in developmental and behavioral pediatrics, neurobehavioral psychology, neurology, neurosurgery and physical medicine and rehabilitation.

Our team approach ensures your child receives all the services he needs for complex medical conditions, ranging from autism spectrum and neuromuscular disorders to epilepsy and mitochondrial diseases. We tailor our services to your child's individual needs so she can achieve the best possible outcomes.

Locations/Contact Us

Contact NeuroDevelopmental Science Center

330-543-8050

Location Small Image
NeuroDevelopmental Science Center
Akron Children's Hospital Specialty Care
Considine Professional Building
215 W. Bowery St.
Suite 4400
Level 4
Akron, Ohio 44308
Fax: 330-543-8054
More about this location...
Map & directions

Our Doctors/Providers

Department Heads:
Bruce H. Cohen
Bruce H. Cohen, MD, FAAN

Director, NeuroDevelopmental Science Center; Pediatric Neurologist

Physicians/Providers:

Micah Baird, MD

Director, Division of Pediatric Physiatry; Medical Director, Rehabilitation; Pediatric Physiatrist; Co-director, Myelodysplasia Clinic

Jacqueline Branch, MD, FAAP

Developmental/Behavioral Pediatrician

Tsulee Chen, MD

Director, Pediatric Neurosurgery; Pediatric Neurosurgeon

Jessica Foster, MD, MPH, FAAP

Director, Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics; Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrician

Nancy George Philip, MD, FAAP

Pediatric Neurologist

Matthew Ginsberg, MD

Pediatric Neurologist

Gwyneth Hughes, MD

Pediatric Neurosurgeon

Joel Katz, DO

Pediatric Neurosurgeon

Susan Klein, MD, PhD

Pediatric Neurologist

Michael Kohrman, MD

Director, Pediatric Neurology; Pediatric Neurologist

Diane Langkamp, MD, MPH, FAAP

Director, Neonatal Follow-up Clinic and Down Syndrome Program; Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrician

Rebecca Lieb, PhD, ABBP

Director, Autism Diagnostic Clinic; Clinical Psychologist

Katrina Lindsay, PhD, NCSP

Director: School Success Clinic and Tic and Tourette Service; Pediatric Psychologist; Nationally Certified School Psychologist

Kelsey Merison, MD

Pediatric Neurologist

Erica Montague Krapf, PhD

Pediatric Neuropsychologist

Kathryn Mosher, MD

Pediatric Physiatrist; Director, Neuromuscular Clinic

Christopher Najarian, MD

Pediatric Physiatrist: Director, Spasticity Clinic; Co-Director, Myelodysplasia Clinic

Chinasa Nwankwo, MD

Pediatric Neurologist/Epileptologist

Dalin Pulsipher, PhD, ABPP

Pediatric Neuropsychologist

Melanie Rak, MD

Pediatric Physiatrist

Ian Rossman, MD, PhD

Pediatric Neurologist

Daniel Smith, MD

Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician

Lisa D. Stanford, PhD, ABPP

Director, Division of Neurobehavioral Health; Neuropsychology Clinical Training Program; Pediatric Neuropsychologist

Kristen Stefanski, MD

Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician

Stephen Steiner, MD, PhD

Pediatric Neurologist

Nicole Swain, PsyD, ABPP

Pediatric Psychologist

Vivek Veluchamy, MD

Pediatric Neurologist

M. Cristina Victorio, MD

Director, Headache Program; Pediatric Neurologist

Chelsea Weyand, PsyD, ABPP

Director, Pediatric Psychology Fellowship Program; Pediatric Psychologist

Shana Wilson Schuler, PhD

Pediatric Psychologist

Kristine Woods, PsyD, BCB

Pediatric Psychologist

Lucyna Zawadzki, MD

Director, Pediatric Epileptology; Pediatric Neurologist/Epileptologist

Nurse Practitioners/Physician Assistants:

Taryn Basel, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Alisha Bauer, MSN, APRN-CNP

Advanced Practice Provider, Inpatient NeuroDevelopmental Science Center

Sandra Bennett, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Cynthia Bennett-Brown, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Yvonne Bolden, BSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Kristin Cole, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Shawnelle Contini, MSHS, PA-C

Advanced Practice Provider, Inpatient NeuroDevelopmental Science Center

Angela Davis, PA-C

Advanced Practice Provider, Inpatient NeuroDevelopmental Science Center

Amanda Delaratta, MSN, APRN-CNP

Advanced Practice Provider, Inpatient NeuroDevelopmental Science Center

Margaret Dell, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Vanessa Douglas, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Christina Fox-Akers, MSN, APRN-CNP

Advanced Practice Provider, Inpatient NeuroDevelopmental Science Center

Andrea Hoverstock, MSN, APRN-CNP

Advanced Practice Provider, Inpatient NeuroDevelopmental Science Center

Melissa Huelsman, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Mozhdeh Jucikas, MSN, APRN-CNP

Coordinator, Epilepsy Surgery Program; Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Dianne Kulasa-Luke, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Tiffany Leonard, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Carolyn Muha, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Kristina Muhleman, MSN, APRN-CNP

Advanced Practice Provider, Inpatient NeuroDevelopmental Science Center

Jared Pennington, PhD, PA-C

Advanced Practice Provider, Inpatient NeuroDevelopmental Science Center

Pretti Polk, MSN, APRN-CNP

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Jacob Sisko, PA-C

Physician Assistant

Kelsey Tasker, PA-C

Physician Assistant

Kelly Wiseman, PA-C

Physician Assistant

Open Clinical Studies

How children and adults with mitochondrial myopathy respond to exercise

We’re trying to learn how people with mitochondrial myopathy respond to exercise. Mitochondria are the body’s "power plants." They turn food into energy. If the "power plants” don’t make enough energy, muscles may grow weak.

We’re studying differences between mitochondrial myopathy patients and healthy children when exercising. An exercise test tells us about breathing, blood circulation and muscle function during exercise.

Such studies may lead to exercise testing as a way to diagnose and monitor mitochondrial myopathy patients.

More about this study...


Currently recruiting