Skip to main content
Skip to main content
Go to homepage

Grand Rounds: State of the Art in Food Allergies

07-19-2019

By Brian Schroer, MD , Director, Allergy and Immunology, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, OH

Allergy and Immunology

More about Brian Schroer, MD


Objectives (Educational Content) :

THE PRESENTATION BEGINS AROUND THE 20 MINUTE MARK. CLICK FORWARD TO VIEW. 1. Summarize and describe updates in knowledge about food allergy including common misconceptions. 2. Explain barriers to implementing early introduction of food to prevent allergies. 3. Examine future food allergy treatments and have a dialogue to answer your questions throughout.

Target Audience:

General pediatricians, family physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, social workers, psychologists and nurses.

Identified Gap:

New information in food allergies will help to prevent allergies, enhance treatment strategies and dispel misconceptions.

Estimated Time to Complete the Educational Activity:

1 hour

Expiration Date for CME Credit:

07-17-2020

Method of Physician Participation in the Learning Process:

The learner will view the presentation, successfully complete a post-test and complete an activity evaluation.

Evaluation Methods:

All learners must successfully complete a post-test, as well as an activity evaluation, to claim CME credit.

Disclosure:

Dr. Schroer has indicated that he has no relevant financial interest in any pharmaceutical or medical device company and does not intend to discuss any off-label uses of medications or medical devices in his presentation.

Accreditation Statement:

Children’s Hospital Medical Center of Akron is accredited by the Ohio State Medical Association to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

CHMCA designates this enduring material activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit ™. Physicians should only claim the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Bibliography:

Mitre E, Et al. Association Between Use of Acid-Suppressive Medications and Antibiotics During Infancy and Allergic Diseases in Early Childhood. JAMA Pediatr. 2018 Jun 4;172(6):e180315.

Wang YY1, Allen KJJ, Koplin JJ. Dietary intervention for preventing food allergy in children. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2017 Dec;29(6):704-710.    Adapted from Middleton’s Allergy Table 65.5 Page 1148

Mitre E, Et al. Association Between Use of Acid-Suppressive Medications and Antibiotics During Infancy and Allergic Diseases in Early Childhood. JAMA Pediatr. 2018 Jun 4;172(6):e180315.

Sicherer S, Sampson H. Food allergy: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014; 133:291–307.

Gupta RS, et al. Prevalence and Severity of Food Allergies Among US Adults. JAMA Netw Open. 2019 Jan 4;2(1):e185630. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.5630.

Sicherer S, Sampson H. Food allergy: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014; 133:291–307.    https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/guidelines-clinicians-and-patients-food-allergy

Du Toit G, Roberts G, Sayre P, Bahnson HT. Randomized trial of peanut consumption in infants at risk for peanut allergy. N Engl J Med 2015; 372:803–813.

Perkin M, Logan K, Mars T, Radulovic S, et al., Enquiring about tolerance (EAT) study. Feasibility of an early allergenic food introduction regimen. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016; 137:1477–1486.

Thompson MM, Hanifin JM. Effective therapy of childhood atopic dermatitis allays food allergy concerns. J Am Acad Dermatol 2005;53(Suppl 2):S214-9.

Chang A, Robison R, Cai M, Singh AM. Natural history of food-triggered atopic dermatitis and development of immediate reactions in children. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016;4:229-236.e1.

Nachshon L, Goldberg MR, Elizur A, Appel MY, Levy MB, Katz Y. Food allergy to previously tolerated foods: course and patient characteristics. AnnAllergy Asthma Immunol 2018;121:77-81.e1.