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Grand Rounds: Understanding Hemoglobinopathies on the Ohio Newborn Screen

08-02-2019

By Prasad Bodas, MD , Sports Medicine Education Director, Akron Children’s Hospital, Akron, OH

Sickle Cell Program

More about Prasad Bodas, MD


Objectives (Educational Content) :

1. Recognize the rationale for, and impact of newborn screening for hemoglobinopathies. 2. Identify Ohio NBS results that indicate hemoglobin disease, including sickle cell disease. 3. Determine Ohio NBS results that indicate hemoglobinopathy trait states. 4. Develop an example workflow for interpretation and response to abnormal hemoglobin results on the newborn screen.

Target Audience:

General pediatricians, family physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, social workers, psychologists and nurses.

Identified Gap:

The use of ultrasound-guided injections can help ease pain, reduce inflammation and at times, help patients avoid surgery.

Estimated Time to Complete the Educational Activity:

1 hour

Expiration Date for CME Credit:

07-31-2020

Method of Physician Participation in the Learning Process:

The learner will view the presentation, successfully complete a post-test and complete an activity evaluation.

Evaluation Methods:

All learners must successfully complete a post-test, as well as an activity evaluation, to claim CME credit.

Accreditation Statement:

Children’s Hospital Medical Center of Akron is accredited by the Ohio State Medical Association to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

CHMCA designates this enduring material activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit ™. Physicians should only claim the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Bibliography:

Brown WJ. Syphilis and other venereal disease. Edited by the American Public Health Association.Vital and health statistics monographs. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1970.

Brosco, Jeffrey, et al., “Early History of Universal Screening for PKU and Galactosemia in the US,” Mailman Center for Child Development, Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami, Quarterly Narrative Report, January-March 2006.

Wilson, J.M.G., and G. Jungner, Principles and Practice of Screening for Disease, 1968

Rodgers G. P., Walker E. C., Podgor M. J., Platt O. S. Mortality in Sickle Cell Disease N Engl J Med 1994; 331:1022-1023, Oct 13, 1994.

Grosse, Scott D, Odame, Isaac, Atrash, Hani K, Amendah, Djesika D, Piel, Frédéric B, Williams, Thomas N. SCD in Africa- a neglected cause of childhood mortality, Am J Prev Med, v42 i6 e101, June 2011