First Aid: Allergic Reactions

First Aid: Allergic Reactions

First Aid

Allergic reactions can be triggered by foods, medications, insect stings, pollen, or other substances. Although most allergic reactions aren't serious, severe reactions can be life threatening and require immediate medical attention.

Signs and Symptoms

Mild:

Severe:

What to Do

Think Prevention!

Have kids avoid substances that are known to trigger an allergic reaction. Keep an oral antihistamine such as diphenhydramine available.

If your child has a severe allergy, be sure doctor-prescribed injectable epinephrine is kept nearby at all times, and that you, your child (if old enough), and anyone who cares for your child know how to use it.

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: April 2014





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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Related Resources
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology offers up-to-date information and a find-an-allergist search tool.
Web SiteAAAAI Just for Kids This Just for Kids page from the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology offers lots of fun activities to help you learn about managing your allergies and asthma.
Web SiteThe Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN) The FAAN mession is to raise public awareness, provide advocacy and education and to advance research on behavior for all of those affected by food allergies and anaphylaxis.
Web SiteAmerican Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (Español)
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