First Aid: Chickenpox

First Aid: Chickenpox

First Aid

Chickenpox (varicella) is an illness that has become much less common in the U.S. due to the chickenpox vaccine. The infection and rash will go away without treatment, but because chickenpox is easily spread from person to another, a child infected with the virus should stay home until the rash is completely crusted over.

Signs and Symptoms

What to Do

To help relieve the itchiness, fever, and discomfort:

Seek Medical Care

If Your Child:

Think Prevention!

To help prevent chickenpox, kids should receive the chickenpox vaccine when they're 12 to 15 months old, and a booster shot when they're 4 to 6 years old.

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: April 2014





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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Related Resources
OrganizationNational Institutes of Health's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) conducts and supports basic and applied research to better understand, treat, and ultimately prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases.
OrganizationCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) The CDC (the national public health institute of the United States) promotes health and quality of life by preventing and controlling disease, injury, and disability.
Web SiteThe History of Vaccines The History of Vaccines is an informational, educational website created by The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the oldest professional society in the United States.
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