Refilling a Prescription

Refilling a Prescription

Choose the Best Refill Option for You

Has your doctor included refills on your prescription? Check the label. If the label shows a number next to the "refills" section, that's how many times you can get more of your medicine without going back to see your doctor.

There are several ways to refill your prescription:

Outgrowing your dose

If your prescriptions are covered by health insurance, be sure to tell the pharmacy if your insurance has changed since you last filled your prescription. If you're not sure about the cost of your medication or the co-pay, ask.

Use the Label

No matter how you choose to refill a prescription, it will be easier if you have all your prescription information handy. Most of what you need is printed on the label.

The prescription label is usually wrapped around the medicine bottle. In some cases — especially with medicines like eye drops and skin creams — it may be stuck on the outer box instead. Check the box when you first get your prescription so you don't throw it out by mistake.

What if you know your prescription is refillable but you threw the bottle or carton away? You can call or go in person to the pharmacy where you got the prescription filled and ask them to look it up in their database. They may ask for ID or want to see your prescription card before giving you a refill, so make sure you bring your cards with you, just in case.

Here's what to look for on the label:

Make Sure You Don't Run Out

Probably the trickiest part about refilling a prescription is remembering to check when you're running low. If you wait until you've taken your last pill to place your refill, and for some reason end up having to wait for it, it could be a mere annoyance — or a major ordeal. Missing even one daily dose of some medications can be dangerous.

On the flip side, if you try to get a jump on things and place a refill weeks in advance, your insurance might not cover it. So keep your eye on the bottle and try to time your refill so the pharmacy has a few days to get things ready for you — especially if they're going to need to contact your doctor.

When You?re Away From Home

Talk to the Pharmacist

When you pick up your refill, you'll probably be asked if you have any questions for the pharmacist. This is a good time to go over how you should be taking the medication — such as whether you should take it with or without food. If you're at all unsure about your medication, ask to see the pharmacist. Most pharmacies ask you to sign a "waiver" if you don't have questions.

Since you've already been taking the medication for a while, you might have noticed side effects. For example, does your acne cream leave your face red and irritated? Do you notice headaches after using your prescription eye drops? These are all good things to mention to your pharmacist — especially as people can sometimes notice new side effects even after they've been taking a medicine for many years.

When you pick up your prescription, let your pharmacist know if you've started using any new medications. Even over-the-counter medications (like cold medicines) or herbal supplements can sometimes affect how well prescriptions work or interact with prescription medications to cause health problems.

If the pharmacy seems busy or you don't want to ask about something personal (like birth control) in front of other people, call and ask to speak to the pharmacist after you leave. Mention that you just refilled your prescription and have questions. No matter how busy they are, pharmacists are still willing and eager to help — it's their job to make sure people take their medications safely and effectively.

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: October 2015
Originally reviewed by: Letitia A. Kanar, PharmD, RPh

Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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