Urine Test: Protein

Urine Test: Protein

What It Is

A urine protein test measures the total amount of protein in the urine. Once a urine sample is collected, the lab determines the amount of protein in the urine sample. This test is often done as part of a routine urinalysis in which several chemicals in the urine are measured.

Why It's Done

In most healthy people, the kidneys prevent significant amounts of protein from entering the urine (pee), so the urine protein test is most commonly used to screen for kidney disease. It's also used to monitor kidney function in kids already diagnosed with kidney disease or who are taking medicines that can affect the kidneys.

Abnormal results also may point to diseases affecting other parts of the body. Other tests may be needed before a definite diagnosis can be made.


Before the test, your child might need to temporarily stop taking specific drugs that could interfere with results. Be sure to discuss this with your doctor.

The Procedure

Collecting the specimen should only take a few minutes. Your child will be asked to pee into a clean sample cup in the doctor's office. If your child isn't potty trained and can't pee into a cup, a small catheter may need to be inserted into the bladder to get the urine specimen.

Alternatively, a urine collection bag with adhesive tape on one end might be used to collect a sample from an infant. You'll clean your baby's genital area and then arrange the bag around the urinary opening. Once the bag is in place, you'll secure it with the attached tape. You can then put a diaper on your baby. Remove the collection bag once your baby has peed into it, usually within an hour. Bring this specimen to the lab.

Sometimes it's better to collect a sample first thing in the morning after your child wakes up. If this is the case, you may be asked to help your child with the test at home. Follow any storage and transportation instructions the lab gives you.

What to Expect

Because the test involves normal urination, there shouldn't be any discomfort as long as your child can provide a urine sample.

Getting the Results

The results of the urine protein test should be available within a day. Your doctor will go over the results with you and explain what they mean. If the results are abnormal, more tests may be ordered.


No risks are involved when taking a urine protein test. The adhesive tape on the collection bag may occasionally irritate an infant’s skin. If a catheter is used to obtain the urine, it may cause temporary discomfort. If you have any questions or concerns about this procedure, talk to your doctor.

Helping Your Child

The urine protein test is painless. Explaining how the test will be conducted and why it's being done can help ease any fear. Make sure your child understands that there should be no other objects, such as toilet paper or hair, in the sample.

If You Have Questions

If you have questions about the urine protein test, speak with your doctor.

Reviewed by: Rupal Christine Gupta, MD
Date reviewed: August 2015

Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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Related Resources
OrganizationNational Kidney Foundation (NKF) NKF seeks to prevent kidney and urinary tract diseases, improve the health and well-being of individuals and families affected by these diseases, and increase the availability of all organs for transplantation.
OrganizationAmerican Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP) The AAKP serves kidney patients and their families by helping them cope with the emotional, physical, and social impact of kidney failure.
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) The AAP is committed to the health and well-being of infants, adolescents, and young adults. The website offers news articles and tips on health for families.
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