First Aid: Cuts

First Aid: Cuts

First Aid

Many kids get a cut from falls or using sharp objects like scissors. Some cuts can be safely treated at home. Large, gaping, and deeper cuts — or any wounds that won't stop bleeding — need medical treatment.

What to Do

If the cut is severe and you can't get your child to a hospital right away or must wait for an ambulance, begin this treatment:

Seek Medical Care

If:

Call 911 Right Away

If Your Child:

Think Prevention!

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: April 2014





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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