Febrile Seizures

Febrile Seizures

Lea este articulo

Febrile seizures are convulsions that can happen during a fever (febrile means "feverish"). They affect kids 6 months to 5 years old, and are most common in toddlers 12-18 months old. The seizures usually last for a few minutes and are accompanied by a fever above 100.4ºF (38ºC).

While they can be frightening, febrile seizures usually end without treatment and don't cause any other health problems. Having one doesn't mean that a child will have epilepsy or brain damage.

About Febrile Seizures

During a febrile seizure, a child's whole body may convulse, shake, and twitch, eyes may roll, and he or she may moan or become unconscious. This type of seizure is usually over in a few minutes, but in rare cases can last up to 15 minutes.

Febrile seizures stop on their own, while the fever continues until it is treated. Some kids might feel sleepy afterwards; others feel no lingering effects.

No one knows why febrile seizures occur, although evidence suggests that they're linked to certain viruses. Kids with a family history of febrile seizures are more likely to have one, and about 35% of kids who have had one seizure will experience another (usually within the first 1-2 years of the first). Kids who are younger (under 15 months) when they have their first febrile seizure are also at higher risk for a future febrile seizure. Most children outgrow having febrile seizures by the time they are 5 years old.

Febrile seizures are not considered epilepsy, and kids who've had a febrile seizure only have a slightly increased risk for developing epilepsy compared to the general population.

Treating Febrile Seizures

If your child has a febrile seizure, stay calm and:

It's also important to know what you should not do during a febrile seizure:

If your child is vomiting or has a lot of saliva coming from the mouth turn their head to the side to prevent choking.

When the seizure is over, call your doctor for an evaluation to determine the cause of the fever. The doctor will examine your child and ask you to describe the seizure. In most cases, no additional treatment is necessary. The doctor may recommend the standard treatment for fevers, which is acetaminophen or ibuprofen. But if your child is under 1 year old, looks very ill, or has other symptoms such as diarrhea or vomiting, the doctor may recommend some testing.

Get help right away from a health care provider if:

Febrile seizures can be scary to witness but remember that they're fairly common, are not usually a symptom of serious illness, and in most cases don't lead to other health problems. If you have any questions or concerns, talk with your doctor.

Reviewed by: Yamini Durani, MD
Date reviewed: July 2012





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





Bookmark and Share

Related Resources
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) The AAP is committed to the health and well-being of infants, adolescents, and young adults. The website offers news articles and tips on health for families.
OrganizationEpilepsy Foundation Epilepsy Foundation has information on books, pamphlets, videos, and educational programs about seizure disorders. Call: (800) EFA-1000
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Family Physicians This site, operated by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), provides information on family physicians and health care, a directory of family physicians, and resources on health conditions.
Related Articles
Febrile Seizures Instruction Sheet Febrile seizures are convulsions that occur in some children with fevers. Although they can be frightening, febrile seizures usually stop on their own after a few minutes and don't cause any other health problems.
Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Although it can be frightening when your child's temperature rises, fever itself causes no harm and can actually be a good thing - it's often the body's way of fighting infections.
Seizures Seizures are caused by abnormal electrical discharges in the brain. Find out what you need to know about seizures and what to do if your child has one.
Brain and Nervous System The brain controls everything we do, and is often likened to the central computer within a vast, complicated communication network, working at lightning speed.
Epilepsy It comes from a Greek word meaning "to hold or seize," and seizures are what happen to people with epilepsy. Learn more about epilepsy in this article written just for kids.
Epilepsy Epilepsy causes electrical signals in the brain to misfire, which can lead to multiple seizures over a period of time. Anyone can get epilepsy at any age, but the majority of new diagnoses are in kids.
What You Need to Know in an Emergency In an emergency, it's hard to think clearly about your kids' health information. Here's what important medical information you should have handy, just in case.
Epilepsy Seizures are a common symptom of epilepsy, a condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Learn all about epilepsy, including what to do if you see someone having a seizure.
A Kid's Guide to Fever What are fevers? Why do kids get them? Get the facts on temperatures and fevers in this article for kids.
iGrow iGrow
Sign up for our parent enewsletter