Broken Bones

Broken Bones

Lea este articulo en EspanolThe harder kids play, the harder they fall. The fact is, broken bones, or fractures, are common in childhood and often happen when kids are playing or participating in sports.

Most fractures affect the upper extremities: the wrist, the forearm, and above the elbow. Why? When kids fall, it's a natural reflex for them to throw their hands out in an attempt to stop the fall.

Many kids will have a broken bone at some point. Most aren't too big of a deal, but fractures can be scary for kids and parents alike. Here's what to expect.

How Do I Know if It's Broken?

Falls are a common part of childhood, but not every fall results in a broken bone. The classic signs of a fracture are pain, swelling, and deformity (which looks like a bump or change in shape of the bone). However, if a break is non-displaced (when the pieces on either side are straight in line with one another), it may be harder to tell.

Some telltale signs that a bone is broken are:

What Do I Do?

Broken Bones Instruction Sheet

If you suspect that your child has a fracture, you should seek medical care immediately.

If your child has either of the following, do not move your child and call 911 for emergency care:

For less serious injuries, try to stabilize the injury as soon as it happens by taking these quick steps:

  1. Remove clothing from around the injured part. Don't force a limb out of the clothing, though. You may need to cut clothing off with scissors to prevent your child from having unnecessary added pain.
  2. Apply a cold compress or ice pack wrapped in cloth. Do not put ice directly on the skin.
  3. Place a makeshift splint on the injured part by:
    • keeping the injured limb in the position you find it
    • placing soft padding around the injured part
    • placing something firm (like a board or rolled-up newspapers) next to the injured part, making sure it's long enough to go past the joints above and below the injury
    • keeping the splint loosely in place with first-aid tape or a wraparound bandage
  4. Get medical care right away, and don't allow the child to eat, in case surgery is needed.

Different Types of Fractures

A doctor might be able to tell whether a bone is broken simply by looking at the injured area. But the doctor will order an X-ray to confirm the fracture and determine what type it is.

Reassure your child that, with a little patience and cooperation, getting an X-ray to look at the broken bone won't take long. Then, he or she will be well on the way to getting a cool — maybe even colorful — cast that friends can sign.

For little ones who may be scared about getting an X-ray, it can help to explain the process like this: "X-rays don't hurt. Doctors use a special machine to take a picture to look at the inside of your body. When the picture comes out, it won't look like the ones you take with your camera. Doctors know how to look at these pictures to see things like broken bones."

A fracture through the growing part of a child's bone (called the growth plate) may not show up on an X-ray. If this type of fracture is suspected, the doctor will treat it even if the X-ray doesn't show a break.

Because their bones are softer and more likely to bend than break in half, kids are more likely to have incomplete fractures (fractures that go partially through the bone). Common incomplete fracture types include:

Mature bones are more likely to break completely. A stronger force will also result in a complete fracture of younger bones. A complete fracture may be a:

Other common fracture terms include:

Bone Fractures

Getting a Splint

The doctor might decide that a splint is all that's needed to keep the bone from moving so it can heal. Whereas a cast encircles the entire broken area and will be removed by the doctor when the bone is healed, a splint usually supports the broken bone on one side.

When the doctor puts on a splint, a layer of cotton goes on first. Next, the splint is placed over the cotton. A splint may be made of stiff pieces of plastic or metal or can be molded out of plaster or fiberglass to fit the injured area comfortably. Then cloth or straps (which usually have Velcro) are used to keep the splint in place. The doctor might need to readjust the splint later.

Getting a Cast

Most broken bones will need a cast to keep the bone from moving so it can heal. A cast is essentially a big bandage with two layers — a soft cotton layer that rests against the skin and a hard outer layer that prevents the broken bone from moving.

Casts for broken bones usually are made of either:

Although kids might think a cast is cool when it's finally on, the process of getting one can be scary, especially for a child in pain. Knowing what happens in the cast room might help ease some worry — both yours and your child's.

For displaced fractures (in which the pieces on either side of the break are out of line), the bone will need to be set before putting on a cast. To set the bone, the doctor will put the pieces of the broken bone in the right position so they can grow back together into one bone (this is called a closed reduction).

A closed reduction is when the doctor realigns the broken bone so that it heals in a straighter position. Realigning the bones is a painful procedure, so sedation is given so the child won't feel it. This medicine usually is given through an intravenous (IV, into a vein) line. A cast is then put on to keep the bone in position. You can expect the doctor to take another X-ray immediately after the realignment procedure to make sure the bones are in good position.

If the fracture is complicated or more serious, an open reduction might be necessary. Open reduction is a surgical procedure in which an incision or cut is made in the skin and metal pins and plates are attached to the broken bone fragments to better stabilize the break while it heals. This is done under general anesthesia.

Additional Treatment

Although most broken bones simply need a cast to heal, other more serious fractures (such as compound fractures) might require surgery to be properly aligned and to make sure the bones stay together during the healing process.

Open fractures need to be cleaned thoroughly in the sterile space of an operating room before they're set because the bone's exposure to the outside environment poses a risk of infection.

With breaks in larger bones or when the bone breaks into more than two pieces, the doctor may put a metal pin in the bone to help set it before placing a cast. When the bone has healed, the doctor will remove the pin.

For the most severe breaks, a surgical repair may require a larger metal plate to be attached to the outside surfaces of the bone, or a rod may be put within the bone to hold bone fragments in place.

When Will a Broken Bone Heal?

Fractures heal at different rates, depending upon the age of the child and the type of fracture. For example, young children may heal in as little as 3 weeks, while it may take 6 weeks for the same kind of fracture to heal in teens.

It's important for your child to wait to play games or sports that might use the injured part until your doctor says it's OK.

Preventing Broken Bones

Although fractures are a common part of childhood, some kids are more likely to have one than others. For example, those with an inherited condition known as osteogenesis imperfecta have bones that are brittle and more susceptible to breaking.

Be sure your child is getting enough calcium and vitamin D to decrease the risk of developing osteoporosis (a condition that causes bones to be more fragile and likely to break) later in life.

Also, don't forget to motivate kids to get involved in regular physical activities and exercise, which are very important to good bone health. Weight-bearing exercises such as jumping rope, jogging, and walking also can help develop and maintain strong bones.

Although it's impossible to keep kids out of harm's way all the time, you can help to prevent injuries by taking simple safety precautions, like childproofing your home, making sure kids always wear proper safety gear such as helmets when participating in sports, and using car seats and seat belts for kids at every age and stage.

If your child does get a broken bone, remember that even though it can be frightening, a fracture is a common, treatable injury. With a little patience, your child will be back to playing and running around before you know it.

Reviewed by: Rupal Christine Gupta, MD
Date reviewed: August 2015

Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2015 KidsHealth® All rights reserved.
Images provided by iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and

Bookmark and Share

Related Resources
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) The AAOS provides information for the public on sports safety, and bone, joint, muscle, ligament and tendon injuries or conditions.
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) The AAP is committed to the health and well-being of infants, adolescents, and young adults. The website offers news articles and tips on health for families.
Web SiteBest Bones Forever A bone health campaign for girls ages 9 to 12 that teaches how to get and keep strong, healthy bones for life. "Grow strong together and stay strong forever!"
Web SiteMilk Matters: Calcium Education from the National Institutes of Health Milk Matters is a public health education campaign launched by the National Institutes of Health to promote calcium consumption among tweens and teens, especially during the ages of 11 to 15, a time of critical bone growth.
Related Articles
Going to the Hospital It may seem scary to go to a hospital, but doctors and nurses are there to help people who are sick or hurt feel better. Read our article for kids to find out what happens inside a hospital.
First Aid: Broken Bones A broken bone requires emergency medical care. Here's what to do if you think your child just broke a bone.
Babysitting: Dealing With Broken Bones What should you do if a child you're babysitting has a broken bone? Our tip sheet can help you be prepared.
When Your Child Needs a Cast Casts keep bones and other tissues in place while they heal. Here's what to expect, and how to care for casts.
Casts and Splints This article for teens has tips on taking care of a cast so it keeps working as it should.
Broken Bones Bones are tough stuff - but even tough stuff can break. Find out what happens when a bone fractures.
Frequently Asked Questions About Casts Getting a cast often comes with plenty of questions. Read on for answers to some frequent inquiries many parents - and kids - may have about casts.
Cool Cast Facts Some injuries will heal best if a cast or splint is used. Find out how they work and how to take care of them in this article for kids.
The Facts About Broken Bones What happens when you break a bone?
Dealing With Broken Bones A broken bone requires emergency medical care. Find out what to do in this printable instruction sheet.
Growth Plate Injuries Injuries to growth plates, which produce new bone tissue and determine the final length and shape of bones in adulthood, must be treated so that bones heal properly.
How Long Will It Take to Heal a Broken Bone? Find out what the experts have to say.
Getting an X-ray (Video) You'll get an X-ray if your doctor thinks you might have a broken bone. Find out how X-rays are done in this video for kids.
Word! Fracture When a bone breaks, it's called a fracture.
Stress Fractures It's not always easy to tell if you have a stress fracture, and stress fractures can get worse quickly. This article explains how to prevent and treat them.
Broken Collarbone (Clavicle Fracture) Learn about broken collarbones (or clavicle fractures), a common sports injury in kids, including how to help prevent them.
What to Expect When Your Cast Comes Off You probably can't wait to get back to your normal activities, but it takes a while for a limb that's been in a cast to finish healing. Here's what to expect.
Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains Broken bones and torn muscles, ligaments, and tendons happen. Find out what to do if your child experiences any breaks, strains, or sprains.
Developments Developments
Sign up for enewsletter
Get involved Get involved
Discover ways to support Akron Children's
Join the conversation Join the conversation
See what our patient families are saying