Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family?

Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family?

The flu vaccine is, indeed, a good idea for families. The flu shot does not cause the flu and it keeps kids and parents from getting sick. Getting the flu is worse than having a cold and can make a person sick for a week or more.

Infants younger than 6 months can't get the vaccine, but if the parents and older kids in the household get it, that will help protect the baby. This is important because infants are more at risk for serious complications from the flu.

Who Should Be Immunized?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends a flu vaccine for everyone 6 months of age and older.

But it's especially important for those in higher-risk groups to be vaccinated. These include:

Certain circumstances might prevent a person from getting the vaccine. If your child falls into any of the groups below, talk to your doctor to see if the vaccine is still recommended:

Types of Flu Vaccine

You might have read about different vaccines coming into the market this year. One type (called trivalent) protects against three strains of the flu virus (usually, two types of influenza A viruses and one influenza B virus), while another (called quadrivalent) protects against four strains. Some are given as an injection (shot), while others are given as a mist sprayed into the nose.

Several new vaccines are approved only for adults at this time, such as "egg-free" vaccines and "intradermal" shots, which are injected into the skin, rather than muscle, using a smaller needle.

This can be confusing for parents, but the important thing to know is that experts are not recommending one vaccine over the other — for now, the main goal is to have everyone over the age of 6 months vaccinated as soon as the vaccine is available, since it's impossible to predict when the flu virus will start spreading.

Egg Allergy and Flu Shots

In the past, it was recommended that anyone with an egg allergy talk to a doctor about whether receiving the flu vaccine was safe because it is grown inside eggs. But health experts now say that the amount of egg allergen in the vaccine is so tiny that it (but not the nasal mist) is safe even for kids with a severe egg allergy. This is especially important during a severe flu season.

Still, a child with an egg allergy should get the flu shot in a doctor's office, not at a supermarket, drugstore, or other venue. And if the allergy is severe, it might need to be given in an allergist's office.

If your child is sick and has a fever, talk to your doctor about rescheduling the flu shot.

When Should Kids Get Vaccinated?

Flu season runs from October to May. It's best to get a flu shot early in the season, as it gives the body a chance to build up immunity to, or protection from, the flu. But getting a shot later in the season is still better than not getting the vaccine at all.

Reviewed by: Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, MD
Date reviewed: September 2013





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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OrganizationCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) The mission of the CDC is to promote health and quality of life by preventing and controlling disease, injury, and disability. Call: (800) CDC-INFO
Web SiteInfluenza Website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) The CDC's site has up-to-date information on flu outbreaks, immunizations, symptoms, prevention, and more.
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