Babysitting: Dealing With a Head Injury

Babysitting: Dealing With a Head Injury

Most head injuries are minor. Still, severe head injuries and concussions can happen. Serious head injuries can cause bruising or bleeding in the brain and will require immediate medical attention.

If a head injury happens, always contact the child's parents. Even mild head injuries may need to be monitored for 24 hours.

Possible signs and symptoms of a mild head injury include:

Possible signs and symptoms of a serious head injury include:

What to Do

If a child has a head injury:

If the injury is minor, let the parents know and watch the child closely to make sure he or she is safe.

To help prevent head injuries:

Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD
Date reviewed: September 2015

Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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Related Resources
Web SiteNational Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) The website of NCIPC contains a variety of injury prevention information.
OrganizationNational Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) NHTSA is the government agency responsible for ensuring and improving automobile and traffic safety.
Web SiteAmerican Red Cross Babysitter's Training Course Designed for 11- to 15-year-olds, the babysitter's training course can help you care for children and infants, make good decisions, solve problems, be a good leader, and more.
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