First Aid: Heat Illness

First Aid: Heat Illness

First AidHeat exhaustion starts slowly, but if it's not quickly treated it can progress to heatstroke. In heatstroke, a person's temperature reaches 105ºF (40.5ºC) or higher. Heatstroke requires immediate emergency medical care and can be fatal.

Signs and Symptoms

Of heat exhaustion:

Of heatstroke:

What to Do

If your child has symptoms of heatstroke, seek emergency medical care immediately. In cases of heat exhaustion or while awaiting help for a child with possible heatstroke:

Think Prevention!

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: April 2014





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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