Does Skim Milk Provide the Same Nutrients as Whole Milk?

Does Skim Milk Provide the Same Nutrients as Whole Milk?

Does skim milk provide the same vitamins and minerals as whole milk?
- Jayne

Yes, skim or nonfat milk has the same nutritional value as whole milk — with no fat. Since the fat portion of whole milk does not contain calcium, you can lose the fat without losing any calcium.

Reduced-fat (2%), low-fat (1%), and nonfat milk have vitamin A and vitamin D added, since these vitamins are lost when the fat is removed.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that all children 2 years of age and older drink low-fat or nonfat milk.

Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD
Date reviewed: July 2013





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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