Medical Care and Your Newborn

Medical Care and Your Newborn

Lea este articulo en EspanolBy the time you hold your new baby in your arms for the first time, chances are you've already chosen one of the most important people in your little one's early life — a doctor. You and your baby will probably visit the doctor more often during the first year than at any other time.

You may have had a prenatal visit with your baby's doctor-to-be to discuss some specifics, such as when he or she will see your newborn for the first time, office hours and on-call hours, who fills in when your doctor is out of the office, and how the office handles after-hours emergencies. You may have also learned the doctor's views on certain issues.

In this way, you've begun to forge a relationship with your baby's doctor that should last through the bumps, bruises, and midnight fevers to come.

What Happens Right After Birth

Depending on your desires and the rules of the hospital or birth center where your baby is delivered, the first exam will either take place in the nursery or at your side:

Your baby will be given a first bath, and the umbilical cord stump will be cleaned. Most hospitals and birthing centers provide personal instructions (and sometimes videos) to new parents that cover feeding, bathing, and other important aspects of newborn care.

The Doctor's Visit

The hospital or birth center where you deliver will notify your child's doctor of the birth. If you have had any medical problems during pregnancy, if any medical problems for your baby are suspected, or if you are having a C-section, a pediatrician or your baby's doctor will be alerted of the impending birth and be standing by to take care of the baby.

The doctor you have chosen for your newborn will probably give your baby a full physical examination within 24 hours of birth. This is a good opportunity to ask questions about your baby's care.

A sample of your baby's blood (usually done by pricking the baby's heel) will be taken to screen for a number of diseases that are important to diagnose at birth so effective treatment can be started promptly. In some cases, a repeat sample to confirm the results will be taken by the baby's doctor soon after going home.

Find out when the doctor would like to see your newborn again. Most healthy newborns are routinely examined at the doctor's office at about 1 to 2 weeks old. But if your baby is discharged home less than 48 hours after delivery, your doctor will want to have your baby come to the office for a check within 48 hours after discharge.

The First Office Visit

During the first office visit, your doctor will assess your baby in a variety of ways. The first office visit will differ from doctor to doctor, but you can probably expect:

Also, if the results of screening tests performed on your newborn after birth are available, they may be discussed with you. Bring any questions or concerns to the doctor at this time. Jot down any specific instructions given regarding special baby care. Keep a permanent medical record for your baby that includes information about growth, immunizations, medications, and any problems or illnesses.

Immunizations Your Baby Will Receive

Babies are born with some natural immunity against infectious diseases because their mothers' infection-preventing antibodies are passed to them through the umbilical cord. This immunity is only temporary, but babies will develop their own immunity against many infectious diseases.

Breastfed babies receive antibodies and enzymes in breast milk that help protect them from some infections and even some allergic conditions.

At birth or shortly after, some infants receive their first artificial immunization, a hepatitis B vaccine (HBV) that is given in three doses. There are combination vaccines, however, that include HBV and are given at the 2-month visit. So other babies will receive no immunizations until 2 months of age.

In either case, it's wise to familiarize yourself with the standard immunization schedule.

When to Call the Doctor

Since small problems can indicate big problems for newborns, don't hesitate to call your doctor if you have concerns. Some difficulties to be aware of during this first month:

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: February 2012





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





Bookmark and Share

Related Resources
OrganizationAmerican Medical Association (AMA) The AMA has made a commitment to medicine by making doctors more accessible to their patients. Contact the AMA at: American Medical Association
515 N. State St.
Chicago, IL 60610
(312) 464-5000
OrganizationMaternal and Child Health Bureau This U.S. government agency is charged with promoting and improving the health of mothers and children.
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) The AAP is committed to the health and well-being of infants, adolescents, and young adults. The website offers news articles and tips on health for families.
OrganizationImmunization Action Coalition This organization is a source of childhood, adolescent, and adult immunization information as well as hepatitis B educational materials.
Related Articles
Bringing Your Baby Home Whether your baby comes home from the hospital right away, arrives later, or comes through an adoption agency, homecoming is a major event.
Pregnancy & Newborn Center Advice and information for expectant and new parents.
Growth and Your Newborn A baby's growth and development is measured from the moment of birth. How much should your baby weigh?
Sleep and Newborns "Does your baby sleep through the night?" is one of the questions new parents hear the most. And almost always the answer is "No."
Choosing Safe Baby Products Choosing baby products can be confusing, but one consideration must never be compromised: your little one's safety.
iGrow iGrow
Sign up for our parent enewsletter