First Aid: Rashes

First Aid: Rashes

First Aid

Rashes can be caused by viruses, bacteria, medications, heat, allergies, and many other things. Many are only a minor annoyance, but some can be serious and require medical treatment.

Signs and Symptoms

What to Do

To ease discomfort:

Seek Medical Care

If:

Think Prevention!

Most rashes are difficult to avoid. However, some specific rashes can be prevented:

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: April 2014





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2015 KidsHealth® All rights reserved.
Images provided by iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com





Bookmark and Share

Related Resources
OrganizationCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) The CDC (the national public health institute of the United States) promotes health and quality of life by preventing and controlling disease, injury, and disability.
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology offers up-to-date information and a find-an-allergist search tool.
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Dermatology Provides up-to-date information on the treatment and management of disorders of the skin, hair, and nails.
OrganizationNational Eczema Association This site contains information about eczema, dermatitis, and sensitive skin.
Related Articles
Fifth Disease Especially common in kids between the ages of 5 and 15, fifth disease is a viral illness that produces a distinctive red rash on the face, body, arms, and legs.
Rashes: The Itchy Truth Learn about rashes in a flash. Check out our article just for kids!
Eczema Eczema is a common skin problem among teens. If you have eczema, read this article to find out more about it and how you can deal with the skin stress.
A to Z Symptoms: Rash A rash is an area of irritated, bumpy, painful, or swollen skin. Most aren't harmful or dangerous.
Ringworm Ringworm isn't a worm at all - it's the name for a type of fungal skin infection. The good news is that ringworm is easy to treat.
Molluscum Contagiosum The name sounds dramatic, like a Harry Potter spell. Luckily, molluscum contagiosum isn't a big deal. Find out what to do about it in this article for teens.
Word Find: Skin Find the hidden words related to skin.
Fungal Infections What do you think of when you hear the word fungus? Do you think of mushrooms? A mushroom is one type of fungus, but fungus is also a type of germ that lives on all of us.
Poison Ivy About 60% to 80% of all people get a reaction to poison ivy. If you're one of them, check out these tips on what to do and how to avoid poison ivy.
Poison Ivy Poison ivy can give you a nasty rash. Find out more about it - and the other plants that can make you itch - in this article for kids.
First Aid: Skin Infections Skin infections are common during childhood. Here's what to do if your child has a skin infection.
Diaper Rash Diaper rash is a very common infection that can cause a baby's skin to become sore, red, scaly, and tender. In most cases, it clears up with simple changes in diapering.
Poison Ivy About 60% to 80% of all people get a reaction to poison ivy. Check out this article for tips on what to do and how to avoid poison ivy.
Shingles Shingles is rare in teens with healthy immune systems, and mostly affects older adults. But it's good to know the basics about this skin rash, which is caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox.
Eczema Eczema can be an itchy nuisance and cause scratching that makes the problem worse. Fortunately, more than half of the kids who have eczema today will be over it by the time they're teenagers.
Erythema Toxicum Erythema toxicum is a common harmless rash that appears in at least half of all full-term infants. No treatment is needed and it goes away on its own.
Pityriasis Rosea This harmless rash often forms a telltale "Christmas tree" pattern on the back that makes it easy to identify.
Pityriasis Rosea Pityriasis rosea is a pink or gray skin rash that's common in teens and young adults. It may itch, but it's harmless. Find out what to do about it in this article for teens.
Your Skin No matter how you think of it, your skin is very important. It covers and protects everything inside your body.
Molluscum Contagiosum Molluscum contagiosum is a common wart-like viral skin infection. For most children, the rash is no big deal and goes away on its own over time.
Shingles Shingles isn't very common in kids - it mostly affects older people. Find out what causes shingles, symptoms to watch for, and what to do if your child has it.
Impetigo Impetigo is a strange-sounding word that might be new to you. It's an infection of the skin caused by bacteria. Read this article to learn more about it.
Erythema Multiforme Erythema multiforme is a rash that appears as red, target-shaped ("bulls-eye") patches or sores on the skin. Find out what causes it - and what to do - in this article for teens.
Erythema Multiforme By the looks of the "bulls-eye" marks this rash leaves on the skin, you might think it's cause for concern. But erythema multiforme clears up on its own within a few weeks.
Hives (Urticaria) Has your child broken out in welts? It could be a case of the hives. Learn how to soothe itchy bumps and help your child feel better.
Hives (Urticaria) Hives cause raised red bumps or welts on the skin. They're pretty common and usually not serious. Find out what to do about hives in this article for teens.
Developments Developments
Sign up for enewsletter
Get involved Get involved
Discover ways to support Akron Children's
Join the conversation Join the conversation
See what our patient families are saying