Vaginal Yeast Infections

Vaginal Yeast Infections

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Angela was taking an antibiotic to treat her strep throat when she noticed a strange discharge in her underwear. To make things worse, her vaginal area felt very itchy.

Angela told her mom what was going on, and they went back to the doctor's office. The doctor told Angela she had a yeast infection. Angela had been nervous about seeing a doctor for such a personal reason, so she was relieved to learn that yeast infections can be a side effect of taking antibiotics.

What Is a Yeast Infection?

A yeast infection is a common infection caused by a type of fungus called candida albicans.

Yeast infections usually happen in warm, moist parts of the body, like the mouth, or vagina. We all have candida in our bodies, but usually it's kept in balance. Things like taking antibiotics can change this balance though, creating a situation where more candida fungus can grow. Doctors call this candida overgrowth candidiasis (pronounced: can-dih-DYE-uh-sis)

Candida can overgrow for many reasons. Stress, pregnancy, and illnesses that affect the immune system may allow yeast to multiply. So can certain medicines, including some birth control pills and steroids. If you're taking antibiotics, such as for strep throat, the antibiotics can kill "good" bacteria that also live in the body and normally keep the growth of candida in the vagina in check. Yeast also can grow a lot if a girl's blood sugar is high. Girls who have diabetes that isn't controlled are more likely to get yeast infections.

Many girls find that yeast infections tend to show up right before they get their periods because of the hormonal changes that come with the menstrual cycle. Clothing (especially underwear) that is too tight or made of materials like nylon that trap heat and moisture might make yeast infections more likely because yeast can thrive in this type of environment. Using scented sanitary products can irritate the vagina, and douching can upset the healthy balance of bacteria in the vagina. Both can make yeast infections more likely.

Yeast infections can happen to any girl. They're not considered sexually transmitted infections. Although yeast infections may spread from one sexual partner to the other, it's rare. The partner of someone who has a yeast infection does not automatically have to be treated unless symptoms appear.

What Are the Symptoms?

Common signs and symptoms of yeast infections may include:

If you have any of these symptoms, see your doctor or gynecologist. It's easy to confuse the symptoms of a yeast infection with those of some STDs and other vaginal infections. Your doctor can give you the right diagnosis so that you can be treated appropriately.

Do Guys Get Yeast Infections?

Guys can get an infection of the head of the penis that is caused by the same candida that causes vaginal infections in girls. Guys who have diabetes or are on antibiotics for a long time are more prone to this infection. A guy with a yeast infection may not have any symptoms or the tip of the penis may become red and sore or itchy. Some guys might have a slight discharge or pain with urination as well.

Guys who are not circumcised need to take extra care to clean properly beneath their foreskins. The warm, moist folds of the foreskin are the perfect environment for yeast to thrive. Keeping the area clean and dry may help prevent an infection, but if symptoms do show up, a trip to the doctor will treat the infection.

How Can I Prevent Yeast Infections?

For most girls, there's no way to prevent yeast infections. You may feel more comfortable if you wear breathable cotton underwear and clothes and avoid vaginal sprays and douches. But there is no scientific proof that this will prevent yeast infections.

If you have diabetes, keeping blood sugar levels stable is a way to avoid yeast infections.

If you think you have an infection, call your doctor for advice. Don't take leftover antibiotics or someone else's antibiotics or medicine. They might be the wrong choice for your condition, and taking antibiotics when they're not needed can make yeast infections more likely.

Do I Need to See a Doctor?

Yes. Treating a yeast infection is simple, but it's still important to visit your doctor for the right diagnosis, since other infections can cause similar symptoms but require different treatments.

At the visit, your doctor might take a urine sample (to rule out a urinary tract infection) and swab some discharge from your vagina to examine under a microscope.

If you do have a yeast infection, your doctor will probably prescribe a pill to swallow or a cream, tablet, or suppository to put in the vagina. When you get home, follow all the directions on the package carefully. Creams, tablets, and suppositories often come with an applicator to help you place the medicine inside your vagina, where it can begin to work. If you're using a vaginal treatment and are sexually active, you should not have sex until the infection has been completely treated because these medicines can weaken condoms and diaphragms.

All of these types of medicine can clear up your symptoms in a couple of days and cure the infection within a week. It's important that you take the medicine for the whole time that your doctor prescribes. If you stop taking it too soon, the infection could come back. If you're not feeling better within a few days of finishing treatment, call your doctor.

Some of the medications used to treat yeast infections are available without a prescription in your local drugstore, but you shouldn't just buy one if you think you have a yeast infection. It's important to see a doctor for your diagnosis because if you actually have another type of infection, it could get worse if not properly treated. Also, over-the-counter medicine should not be used by anyone younger than 12 or girls who might be pregnant without talking to a doctor first.

Yeast infections can be annoying, especially if they happen regularly. To help avoid them, follow your doctor's advice, wear cotton underwear, and try to wear loose-fitting clothes. Your body will thank you.

Reviewed by: Larissa Hirsch, MD
Date reviewed: April 2015





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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Related Resources
Web SitePlanned Parenthood Info for Teens This site from the Planned Parenthood Federation of America has information on relationships and sexual health for teens.
OrganizationCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) The CDC (the national public health institute of the United States) promotes health and quality of life by preventing and controlling disease, injury, and disability.
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