A to Z Symptoms: Back Pain

A to Z Symptoms: Back Pain

A to Z Symptom: Back Pain

May also be called: Lumbago

Back pain is fairly common, even in kids and teens. It can occur anywhere in the back, and might be a dull ache or a sharp, shooting pain.

More to Know

Causes

Back pain often is caused by muscle strain or sprain, often from an injury or wearing a heavy backpack. Incorrect backpack use can affect posture and cause bones of the spine to press on or pinch the nerves branching out from the spinal cord.

muscles illustration

Less commonly, back pain can be caused by a fracture (break) in a vertebra (spine bone) or slipping of vertebrae on each other. This happens more often in kids and teens who engage in back-bending activities, like gymnastics.

Stiffness and pain in the lower back, sometimes called lumbago, can be caused by things like lifting heavy objects or sitting in one position for too long. It usually will go away on its own within a few days or weeks, and in the meantime can be managed by staying active and taking short-term medications (acetaminophen or ibuprofen) to control pain.

Treatment

Treatment, if needed, will depend on the cause of the pain. Minor pain can be managed by applying a heating pad or hot pack to the area or with gentle massage.

If an overloaded backpack is to blame, kids and teens can reduce back strain by:

Keep in Mind

Many cases of back pain can be prevented by stretching before and after physical activities, getting regular low-impact exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, and avoiding heavy lifting. But if pain persists or is accompanied by other symptoms, call your doctor.

All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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Related Resources
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) The AAP is committed to the health and well-being of infants, adolescents, and young adults. The website offers news articles and tips on health for families.
Web SiteBackpack Safety America (BSA) This website is dedicated to teaching parents, teachers, kids, and others the importance of properly packing, lifting, and carrying backpacks.
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Family Physicians This site, operated by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), provides information on family physicians and health care, a directory of family physicians, and resources on health conditions.
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