Is It Possible to Donate Blood After Having Hepatitis B?

Is It Possible to Donate Blood After Having Hepatitis B?

Is it possible to donate blood after having hepatitis B?
- Josh*

Hepatitis B is one of the viruses that cause hepatitis, which is an inflammation of the liver that also can be caused by medication, drugs, alcohol, or actual physical injury to the liver. One of the ways people become infected with the hepatitis B virus is through blood.

People who have been infected with hepatitis B at some point may carry the virus without even knowing it. They can pass hepatitis B to others through blood or sexual contact. Because of this, a person who has tested positive for hepatitis B at any point in his or her lifetime isn't allowed to donate blood.

It's not just hepatitis B that affects eligibility to donate blood. Other types of viral hepatitis, HIV, and some other infections can affect that person's ability to give blood.

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: June 2013

* Names have been changed to protect user privacy.

Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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Related Resources
OrganizationAmerican Medical Association (AMA) The AMA has made a commitment to medicine by making doctors more accessible to their patients. Contact the AMA at: American Medical Association
515 N. State St.
Chicago, IL 60610
(312) 464-5000
Web SiteAmerican Association of Blood Banks This site of the American Association of Blood Banks describes blood banking and transfusions.
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