Vaginal Discharge: What's Normal, What's Not

Vaginal Discharge: What's Normal, What's Not

Normal vaginal discharge has several purposes: cleaning and moistening the vagina, and helping to prevent and fight infections. Although it's normal for the color, texture, and amount of vaginal fluids to vary throughout a girl's menstrual cycle, some changes in discharge may indicate a problem.

First, it helps to learn some of the differences between normal and abnormal vaginal discharge. This will help you to recognize changes that may occur.

Normal vaginal fluids can vary somewhat in texture and color. They can be somewhat thin, sticky, and elastic or thick and gooey. Vaginal fluids should be clear, white, or off-white in color.

It's important to keep an eye out for changes in vaginal fluids. The following changes may indicate a problem:

Vaginal infections, such as bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis (yeast infection), and trichomoniasis are common causes of abnormal vaginal discharge. Some infections that can cause changes in vaginal discharge are spread by having sex, such as gonorrhea. Other infections can occur with or without having sex, such as bacterial vaginosis or a yeast infection.

If you notice any changes in your vaginal discharge or think you may have a problem, you should see a doctor as soon as possible.

The symptoms of these infections can be very similar, but there are some differences to look for:

It's very important to see a doctor or go to a health clinic (like Planned Parenthood) if you have any of the symptoms of abnormal vaginal discharge. This is really important for girls who have had sex, especially those who have had sex without using a condom, since many STDs cause changes in vaginal discharge.

If you think you might have an STD or that you've been exposed to an STD, let the doctor know. Also see the doctor right away if you have discharge along with fever or pain in the belly or pelvic area.

Reviewed by: Larissa Hirsch, MD
Date reviewed: October 2013





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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Web SitePlanned Parenthood Info for Teens This site from the Planned Parenthood Federation of America has information on relationships and sexual health for teens.
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