Why Do Doctors Perform Testicular Exams?

Why Do Doctors Perform Testicular Exams?

My son just had a physical exam, and the doctor examined his testicles. Why is this done?
- Phyllis

Testicular exams can make any guy feel a bit awkward or embarrassed, but just like a blood pressure check, they're a normal part of a physical examination.

Doctors check the testicles and the area around them to make sure everything is healthy and developing normally and that there are no problems, such as a hernia, a varicocele, or, in rare cases, a tumor. Teens should also learn how to perform testicular self-examinations so they can learn what is normal and what changes might signal a problem.

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: October 2012

Have a question? Email us.

Although we can't reply personally, you may see your question posted to this page in the future. If you're looking for medical advice, a diagnosis, or treatment, consult your doctor or other qualified medical professional. If this is an emergency, contact emergency services in your area.





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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