Word! Long-Term Control Medicines

Word! Long-Term Control Medicines

Long-Term Control Medicines

(also called Controller or Maintenance Medicines)

(En español: Medicamentos de control)

Many kids with asthma need to take medicine every day to control their asthma. Why should they take medicine even when they're feeling fine? There's a good reason. Long-term control medicines work by keeping the airways in the lungs open and clear, which makes it easier to breathe.

These medicines work slow, not fast. It may take days or weeks for them to do their job. That's why a person with asthma needs to take them regularly. That gives these medicines a chance to get working, so they can keep airways from getting swollen and narrow.





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2015 KidsHealth® All rights reserved.
Images provided by iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com





Bookmark and Share

Related Resources
Web SiteAAAAI Just for Kids This Just for Kids page from the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology offers lots of fun activities to help you learn about managing your allergies and asthma.
Related Articles
How Do Asthma Medicines Work? Kids who have asthma need to take medicine. But what kind of medicine do they take and what does it do? Let's find out.
What's an Asthma Action Plan? If you have asthma, you'll want to have an asthma action plan. Find out more in this article for kids.
Asthma Center Asthma means breathing problems. Find out what's going on in the lungs and how to stay healthy, if you have it.
Dealing With Asthma Triggers Don't pull that asthma trigger! If you have asthma, certain things may cause you to cough and have trouble breathing. Find out more about asthma triggers in this article for kids.
Asthma Asthma can cause a person's airways to get swollen and irritated, making it hard to breathe. Find out more in this article for kids.
iGrow iGrow
Sign up for our parent enewsletter