Talking Politics: What to Say to Your Kids

Talking Politics: What to Say to Your Kids

When it comes to talking to your kids about political matters, you may think that your 8-year-old would rather be playing video games or that your 14-year-old would prefer texting friends — but you might be wrong.

Prior to the 2008 presidential election, KidsHealth.org asked more than 2,000 kids and teens throughout the U.S. what they thought about the election and how it might affect them, if at all.

A whopping 75% of kids and 79% of teens answered "yes" when asked whether they thought that the outcome of the election would change their lives. Nearly half of teens surveyed said that they believed they'd had at least some influence on their parents' choice of candidate.

So, if you think your children are only interested in talking about kids' stuff, think again.

What's On Their Minds?

As presidential election time approaches again in 2012, we’ll be seeing signs, bumper stickers, or ads for political candidates everywhere. Turn on the TV or radio or surf the Web and you're sure to face an onslaught of messages on everything from health care, the economy, jobs, and housing, to war abroad and the energy crisis.

As parents, we can't expect our kids not to be influenced by this media blitz. In fact, most teens who took our election poll in 2008 ranked talked-about issues — like gas and food prices, education, health care, war, and the environment — as "very important" to them.

Knowing what kids think about these issues and how they might affect your family is important. Talking about it not only helps to promote learning and develop critical thinking skills, but also lets you clarify any misconceptions your kids may have or calm any fears about the future.

Talk About It

When discussing an election, talk about what you believe and why — and ask your kids what they think and feel. This shows that you value their opinions and want to hear what's on their minds.

If their opinions differ from yours, that's OK. Use it as a teaching opportunity: Why do they feel that way? Can they come up with examples to support their view? Engaging kids in this way helps them to develop their own opinions and express their ideas.

More tips to keep in mind:

Casting Your Vote

Talking with your kids about important issues, the electoral process, and why voting is important not only provides them with a mini lesson on how government affects the world, but also shows that every person's opinion counts. Even though they can't vote yet, they'll be able to someday — perhaps very soon — so it's important that they start becoming informed.

If possible, take your kids with you into the voting booth on Election Day to show them firsthand how the process works. Be a role model by setting a positive example that lets them know you value the right to vote. Show your kids the importance of voting — and they'll grow up knowing that every vote counts.

Reviewed by: D'Arcy Lyness, PhD
Date reviewed: January 2012





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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