Dealing With Cuts

Dealing With Cuts

Most small cuts don't present any danger to kids. But larger cuts often require immediate medical treatment. Depending on the type of wound and its location, occasionally there is a risk of damage to tendons and nerves.

Cuts Instruction Sheet

What to Do:

For Minor Bleeding From a Small Cut or Abrasion (Scrape):

For Bleeding From a Large Cut or Laceration:

If you have any doubt about whether stitches are needed, call your doctor.

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: September 2013





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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