First-Aid Kit

First-Aid Kit

A well-stocked first-aid kit, kept within easy reach, is a necessity in every home. Having supplies gathered ahead of time will help you handle an emergency at a moment's notice. You should keep one first-aid kit in your home and one in each car. Also be sure to bring a first-aid kit on family vacations.

You can purchase a first aid kit at drugstores or a local Red Cross office, or make one of your own. If you decide to make one, choose containers for your kits that are roomy, durable, easy to carry, and simple to open. Plastic tackle boxes or containers for storing art supplies are ideal, since they're lightweight, have handles, and offer a lot of space.

What You'll Need

Include the following in each of your first-aid kits:

After you've stocked your first-aid kits:

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: September 2013





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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