First Aid: Sunburn

First Aid: Sunburn

First AidSunburn can happen within 15 minutes of being in the sun, but the redness and discomfort may not be noticed for a few hours. Repeated sunburns can lead to skin cancer. Unprotected sun exposure is even more dangerous for kids who have many moles or freckles, very fair skin and hair, or a family history of skin cancer.

Signs and Symptoms

Mild:

Severe:

What to Do

Seek Emergency Medical Care

If:

Think Prevention!

Reviewed by: Rupal Christine Gupta, MD
Date reviewed: June 2014





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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Related Resources
OrganizationAAP Pediatric Referral Department Use this website to find a pediatrician in your area or to find general health information for parents from birth through age 21.
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Dermatology Provides up-to-date information on the treatment and management of disorders of the skin, hair, and nails.
OrganizationAmerican Academy of Family Physicians This site, operated by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), provides information on family physicians and health care, a directory of family physicians, and resources on health conditions.
Web SiteThe Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation educates people about skin cancer and ways to prevent it.
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