First Aid: Burns

First Aid: Burns

First Aid

Scald burns from hot water and other liquids are the most common burns in early childhood. Because burns range from mild to life threatening, some can be treated at home, while others need emergency medical care.

What to Do

If your child is severely burned, call 911 right away. While you wait for help, begin these treatments:

Seek Emergency Medical Care

If:

Think Prevention!

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: April 2014





Note: All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

© 1995-2014 The Nemours Foundation/KidsHealth. All rights reserved.





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Related Resources
OrganizationNational Safety Council The National Safety Council offers information on first aid, CPR, environmental health, and safety.
OrganizationAmerican Red Cross The American Red Cross helps prepare communities for emergencies and works to keep people safe every day. The website has information on first aid, safety, and more.
OrganizationNational Fire Prevention Association This nonprofit organization provides fire safety information and education.
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