Brachial Plexus Treatment Center

Akron Children's Brachial Plexus Treatment Program brings together a team of pediatric specialists from orthopedics, neurosurgery, physiatry and other disciplines to treat children of all ages who have suffered brachial plexus injuries. Read More...

Adamczyk Mark
Mark Adamczyk, MD
Co-Director, Brachial Plexus Treatment Center

Letourneau Peter
Peter Letourneau, MD
Co-Director, Brachial Plexus Treatment Program

Sahgal Suneet
Suneet Sahgal, MD
Director, Spasticity Program; Co-Director, Brachial Plexus Treatment Program

Jubara Lori
Lori Jubara, OTR/L
Occupational Therapist

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Conditions We Treat

Conditions we treat
Here are some of the conditions treated in this department. Select a condition to get more information and resources: Brachial Plexus Injury.

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Overview

Brachial Plexus Treatment - Overview

Our center provides treatment for children and teens suffering from brachial plexus injuries, which are caused by damage to the brachial plexus — the network of spinal nerves that supply the arm, forearm and hand with movement and sensation.

The injury can occur in contact sports, falls, motor vehicle accidents or during delivery when a baby’s shoulders are trapped in the birth canal.

Known risk factors include large gestational age, maternal diabetes, prolonged pregnancy, prolonged labor, breech presentation and delivery by forceps.

Symptoms can include: 

  • A limp or paralyzed arm
  • Lack of muscle control in the arm, hand or wrist 
  • Lack of feeling or sensation in the arm or hand

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What To Expect

Once diagnosed, children with birth injuries follow Akron Children's brachial plexus injury protocol with specific assessments and interventions planned at 1 month, 2 months, 3 months, 6 months and more, if necessary.

Diagnostic procedures throughout the treatment plan may include a physical exam, EMG, X-ray, MRI, muscle testing, testing for sensory function, standardized scoring classifications, and observation of functional movement.

Most children with brachial plexus injury benefit from therapy, but some may require surgery. Specialized treatments may include: 

  • Electrical stimulation 
  • Splints 
  • Aquatic therapy 
  • Rehabilitative taping 
  • Home exercise program

Research shows that 80 to 90 percent of children with brachial plexus injuries from birth make a complete or nearly complete recovery within the first year. If they are to recover strength completely, children usually do so within the first 3 months.

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Patient Family Resources

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Brachial Plexus Treatment Center
Contact Us

330-543-3500

our locations

Akron Children's Hospital
Center for Orthopedics & Sports Medicine
Considine Professional Building
215 W. Bowery St., Suite 7200
Akron , OH 44308
Phone: 330-543-3500
Fax: 330-543-5001
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