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Managing Your Medical Care

  • Adolescent Medicine Specialists

    Adolescent medicine doctors are specialists who have extra training in the medical and emotional issues that many teens face.

  • Choosing Your Own Doctor

    You deserve medical care from someone who helps you feel comfortable and understood. Get tips on finding the best doctor for you.

  • I Think I Have a Mental Health Problem. Who Can I Talk To?

    If you have a mental health problem or you just need support through a tough time, it can help to talk with someone. Here's how teens can find that help.

  • Sports Physicals

    Just as professional sports stars need medical care to keep them playing their best, so do student athletes. That's why it's important to get a sports physical.

  • Strokes

    Strokes are more common in older adults, but teens can have one too. This "brain attack" happens when blood flow to the brain stops, even for a second.

  • Taking Care of Your Teeth

    There's a lot more to taking care of your teeth than breath mints and mouth sprays. Read this article to learn the facts on flossing, how to give plaque the brush-off, and much more.

  • Taking Care of Your Vision

    Even if you're lucky enough to have perfect vision, taking care of and protecting your eyes is vital to keeping your peepers perfect. Learn all about how to take care of your baby blues (or browns or greens) in this article.

  • Taking Charge of Your Medical Care

    Figuring out health care is part of becoming an independent adult. Here are tips for teens on what that involves, and how to choose your own doctor.

  • Transitioning Your Medical Care: Diabetes

    Most teens with diabetes should switch to an adult health care provider when they're between 18 and 21. Here's how you can do that.

  • Vaccine Basics

    Missing out on shots puts you at more serious risk than you might think. That one little "ouch" moment protects you from some major health problems.

  • What's It Like to Have Surgery?

    Knowing what to expect with surgery before you get to the hospital can make you less anxious about your surgical experience - and less stress helps a person recover faster.

  • What's It Like to Stay in the Hospital?

    Scheduled for a hospital stay? Knowing what to expect can make it a little easier.

  • Asthma Action Plan

    Use this printable sheet to help manage your asthma.

  • Asthma Diary

    Use this weekly diary to keep a record of your asthma symptoms, peak flows, and the amount of medicine taken.

  • Blood Glucose Record

    If you have diabetes, you can use this printable sheet to record your blood glucose levels.

  • Build a Healthy Breakfast

    Use these breakfast planning ideas to select healthy foods that satisfy your taste buds and get you on your way fast.

  • Blood Types

    Blood might look the same and do the same job, but tiny cell markers mean one person's body can reject another person's blood. Find out how blood types work in this article for teens.

  • Electronic Health Records

    Because EHRs improve how well your doctors talk to each other and coordinate your treatment, they can enhance your medical care. Get the facts on electronic health records.

  • Health Insurance Basics

    Taking charge of your own health care is a big step, and it can be a little overwhelming. Here's a quick crash course on insurance for teens.

  • Health Insurance: Cracking the Code

    Health insurance has a language all its own. This article for teens explains what some key terms mean.

  • ADHD Medicines

    Medicine doesn’t cure ADHD. But it does help boost a person's ability to pay attention, slow down, and have more self-control. This article for teens has details on how ADHD medicines help.

  • Birth Control Patch

    Before you consider having sex, you need to know how to protect yourself. Learn what the birth control patch is, how well it works, and more.

  • Birth Control Pill

    Before you consider having sex, you need to know how to protect yourself. Read this article to learn what birth control pills are, how well they work, and more.

  • Birth Control Ring

    A woman places the birth control ring in her vagina where it slowly releases hormones into the bloodstream to prevent pregnancy.

  • Birth Control Shot

    Before you consider having sex, you need to know how to protect yourself. Read this article about the birth control shot and find out how it works - and how well.

  • Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel

    A basic metabolic panel (BMP) is a group of blood tests that provide doctors with clues about how the body is working. Find out why doctors do this and what's involved for teens.

  • Blood Test: Complete Blood Count

    This common blood test helps doctors gather information about a person's blood cells and how they're working. Find out why doctors do this test and what's involved for teens.

  • Blood Test: Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

    This group of blood tests provides doctors with clues about how the body is working. Find out why doctors do these tests and what's involved for teens.

  • Blood Test: Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR)

    This test measures the speed at which red blood cells fall to the bottom of an upright glass test tube. Find out why doctors do it and what's involved for teens.

  • Blood Test: Liver Function Tests

    If your liver isn't working properly, it can affect your overall health. Find out why doctors do liver function tests and what's involved for teens.

  • Blood Test: Magnesium

    A magnesium test looks at levels of the mineral magnesium in a person's blood. Find out why doctors do this test and what's involved for teens.

  • Blood Test: Phosphorus

    A phosphorus test looks at levels of phosphorus in a person's blood. Find out why doctors do this test and what's involved for teens.

  • Chemotherapy

    Chemotherapy (chemo) is treatment with medicines that stop the growth of cancer cells. Find out how chemo works and what to expect when getting treatment.

  • Dealing With Addiction

    Find out what you can do if you think you or a friend has a drug or alcohol addiction - from recognizing the warning signs to suggestions to help you stay clean.

  • Emergency Contraception

    Emergency contraception is a way to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex; for example, if a condom breaks or slips off during sex. It is also available to teens who are forced to have unprotected sex.

  • Getting Rid of Old Medicines

    Medicines can cause problems if they get into the water supply or the wrong hands. Find out how to dispose of old or unused meds safely in this article for teens.

  • How Do Asthma Medicines Work?

    Two different types of medicines are used to treat asthma: long-term control medicines and quick-relief medicines. Read about how they work, and why people might need to take them.

  • How to Fill a Prescription

    Taking responsibility for your own health care means understanding things like prescriptions. Read our tips for teens on filling a prescription.

  • Medical Tests: What to Expect (Video)

    Need to get a blood test? An MRI? These videos show what happens in 10 of the most common medical tests.

  • Medicines for Diabetes

    Taking medicines is a major part of staying healthy if you have diabetes because they help you keep your blood sugar levels under control.

  • My Asthma Inhaler Doesn't Help. What Can I Do?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Peritoneal Dialysis

    This medical treatment helps people with kidney failure. It can be done at home, often overnight, to take over the kidneys' job of filtering blood. Find out more in this article for teens.

  • Physical Therapy

    Physical therapy helps people get back to full strength and movement - and manage pain - in key parts of the body after an illness or injury.

  • Radiation Therapy

    More than half of all people with cancer are treated with radiation therapy. Get the facts on radiation therapy, including what it is, what to expect, and how to cope with side effects.

  • Refilling a Prescription

    Tips and advice for teens on refilling a prescription.

  • Splints

    A splint is a support device that keeps an injured area from moving. Doctors often use splints to hold bones and joints in place so they can heal after a fracture.

  • Steroids and Cancer Treatment

    If your doctor prescribed steroids as part of your treatment for an illness, don't worry. It's not the illegal, doping scandal kind of steroid. Get the details in this article for teens.

  • Taking Prescription Opioid Pain Medicines Safely

    Opioids are very good at controlling pain, but there are risks to taking them. If you've been prescribed a medicine that contains an opioid, find out how to use it safely.

  • Understanding Medicines and What They Do

    Medicines can cure, stop, or prevent disease; ease symptoms; or help in the diagnosis of illnesses. This article describes different types of medications and offers tips on taking them.

  • Wound Healing and Care

    How well a wound heals depends on where it is on the body and what caused it – as well as how well someone cares for the wound at home. Find out what to do in this article for teens.

  • Atrial Septal Defect

    Atrial septal defect, or ASD, is a heart defect that some people are born with. Most ASDs are diagnosed and treated successfully with few or no complications.

  • Blood Types

    Blood might look the same and do the same job, but tiny cell markers mean one person's body can reject another person's blood. Find out how blood types work in this article for teens.

  • Celiac Disease

    People who have celiac disease, a disorder that makes their bodies react to gluten, can't eat certain kinds of foods. Find out more - including what foods are safe and where to find them.

  • Cerebral Palsy

    Cerebral palsy is one of the most common developmental disabilities in the United States. It affects a person's ability to move and coordinate body movements.

  • Coarctation of the Aorta

    When someone has coarctation of the aorta, that person's aorta (the major blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart to the body) is narrowed at some point.

  • Cystic Fibrosis

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease that causes the body to produce mucus that's extremely thick and sticky. It mainly affects the lungs and the pancreas, causing serious breathing and digestive problems.

  • Epilepsy

    Seizures are a common symptom of epilepsy, a condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Learn all about epilepsy, including what to do if you see someone having a seizure.

  • Hemodialysis

    Hemodialysis is the type of kidney dialysis that doctors use most to take over the kidneys' job of filtering the blood. Find out more in this article for teens.

  • HIV and AIDS

    There is no cure for AIDS, which is why prevention is so important. Get the facts on HIV/AIDS, as well as how it affects the body and is treated, in this article.

  • How Can I Prevent Hearing Loss?

    Hearing loss (also called hearing impairment) makes it hard to hear or understand sounds. But you can do something about noise-induced hearing loss.

  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an ongoing illness caused by an inflammation of the intestines. There are two kinds of IBD: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

  • Kidney Disease

    Sometimes, the kidneys can't do their job properly. In teens, kidney disease is usually due to infections, structural issues, glomerulonephritis, or nephrotic syndrome.

  • Lupus

    Lupus is a disease that affects the immune system. Learn how lupus is treated, signs and symptoms, how to support a friend who has it, and more.

  • Peritoneal Dialysis

    This medical treatment helps people with kidney failure. It can be done at home, often overnight, to take over the kidneys' job of filtering blood. Find out more in this article for teens.

  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the ovaries produce higher than normal amounts of certain hormones, which can interfere with egg development and release. Learn how doctors diagnose and treat PCOS.

  • Sickle Cell Crisis (Pain Crisis)

    Sickle cell crisis is when sickled cells clog small blood vessels, causing extreme pain and other symptoms. Learn more, including how to help prevent a crisis and what to do if one does happen.

  • Sickle Cell Disease

    Sickle cell disease is a blood disorder that makes red blood cells change shape and cause health problems. Find out more in this article for teens.

  • Taking Charge of Your Medical Care

    Figuring out health care is part of becoming an independent adult. Here are tips for teens on what that involves, and how to choose your own doctor.

  • Tourette Syndrome

    Tourette syndrome affects the body's brain and nervous system by causing tics - repeated, uncontrollable movements or involuntary vocal sounds.

  • Transitioning Your Medical Care: Sickle Cell Disease

    At a certain point, you'll no longer be able to see your childhood doctor. Here are tips for teens on making a smooth switch to adult sickle cell care.

  • Turner Syndrome

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects about 1 in every 2,500 girls. Learn more about the condition and how doctors treat it.

  • Ventricular Septal Defect

    Ventricular septal defect, or VSD, is a heart condition that a few teens can have. Find out what it is, how it happens, and what doctors do to correct it.

  • Visual Impairment

    When one or more parts of the eye or brain that are needed to process images become diseased or damaged, severe or total loss of vision can occur. Read all about visual impairment.

What next?