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Doctors & Hospitals

  • Are Treatments From Other Countries Safe? Are Treatments From Other Countries Safe?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Balancing Academics and Serious Illness Balancing Academics and Serious Illness

    When your child has a serious or chronic illness, it's hard to think beyond the next treatment. But with planning and communication, you can help your child balance treatment and academics.

  • Birth Defects Birth Defects

    Some birth defects are minor and cause no problems; others cause major disabilities. Learn about the different types of birth defects, and how to help prevent them.

  • Camps for Kids With Special Needs Camps for Kids With Special Needs

    There are many camp choices for kids with special needs. From highly specialized camps to regular camps that accommodate kids with special needs, options abound.

  • Caring for a Seriously Ill Child Caring for a Seriously Ill Child

    Taking care of a chronically ill child is one of the most draining and difficult tasks a parent can face. But support groups, social workers, and family friends often can help.

  • Caring for Siblings of Kids With Special Needs Caring for Siblings of Kids With Special Needs

    Kids love their siblings. Often, those who have a brother or sister with special needs want to help. Here's how to help them feel loved and secure about their place in the family.

  • Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Babies & Preschoolers Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Babies & Preschoolers

    If your child has cerebral palsy, there's a lot to know. This checklist makes it easy to determine what programs and services very young children with special needs might need.

  • Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Big Kids Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Big Kids

    If your child has cerebral palsy, there's a lot to know. This checklist makes it easy to determine what programs and services school-age kids with special needs might need.

  • Chemotherapy Chemotherapy

    Chemotherapy medications are used to treat cancer throughout the body by killing actively dividing cells. Learn more about chemo.

  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    At least 1 million people in the United States have chronic fatigue syndrome, a condition that makes it difficult to perform everyday tasks. Read more about CFS.

  • Common Diagnoses in the NICU Common Diagnoses in the NICU

    Learn about common NICU conditions, what causes them, how they're diagnosed, how they're treated, and how long babies might stay in the unit.

  • Electronic Health Records Electronic Health Records

    Many health institutions digitally store their patients' health information. Learn about electronic health records (EHRs) and how they can improve health care.

  • End-of-Life Care for Children With Terminal Illness End-of-Life Care for Children With Terminal Illness

    End-of-life medical care focuses on preventing and relieving pain and suffering, and easing the fear and anxiety associated with serious illness.

  • Financial Management During Crisis Financial Management During Crisis

    Although the emotional price of raising a seriously ill child can be devastating, it's only part of the picture. Even during this difficult time, you have to consider the financial implications.

  • Financial Planning for Kids With Special Needs Financial Planning for Kids With Special Needs

    These 10 steps can help take the anxiety and worry out of your child's financial future and make sure that your child will be taken care of even after you're gone.

  • Finding Respite Care for Your Child With Special Needs Finding Respite Care for Your Child With Special Needs

    Finding that perfect person to care for your child can be a challenge. These resources can help.

  • Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions

    Involving teens in their health care can help prepare them for managing it on their own as adults.

  • If Your Child Has a Heart Defect If Your Child Has a Heart Defect

    Congenital heart defects are relatively common, affecting almost 1 in every 100 newborns in the United States.

  • Is a Clinical Trial Right for Your Child? Is a Clinical Trial Right for Your Child?

    Deciding to enroll your child in a clinical study will depend on its potential benefits and risks, as well as your child's particular illness. Learn more.

  • Is My Child Too Sick to Go to School? Is My Child Too Sick to Go to School?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Managing Home Health Care Managing Home Health Care

    When kids need intensive health care after they're discharged from the hospital, it's important that family and caregivers learn about the devices, equipment, and support they'll need.

  • Munchausen by Proxy Syndrome Munchausen by Proxy Syndrome

    Munchausen by proxy syndrome (MBPS) involves a parent or caregiver misleading others into thinking that a child has medical problems by exaggerating, fabricating, or inducing symptoms.

  • Neurocutaneous Syndromes Neurocutaneous Syndromes

    Neurocutaneous syndromes are genetic disorders that lead to tumor growth in various parts of the body. Learn how to maximize the quality of life for children with these diseases.

  • Neurofibromatosis Neurofibromatosis

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) can cause tumors to grow on nerve tissue, producing skin and bone abnormalities. Learn more about NF, including how it's diagnosed and treated.

  • Occupational Therapy Occupational Therapy

    Occupational therapy can help improve kids' cognitive, physical, and motor skills and enhance their self-esteem and sense of accomplishment.

  • Palliative Care Palliative Care

    The goal of palliative medical care is to prevent and relieve pain and suffering while also easing stress, anxiety, and the fear associated with serious illness.

  • Physical Therapy Physical Therapy

    Doctors often recommend physical therapy for kids who have been injured or have movement problems from an illness, disease, or disability. Learn more about PT.

  • Radiation Therapy Radiation Therapy

    Radiation therapy, also called radiotherapy, irradiation, or X-ray therapy, is one of the most common forms of cancer treatment.

  • Sending Your Child With Special Needs to Camp Sending Your Child With Special Needs to Camp

    You've decided to send your child with special needs to camp this summer. Now what can you both do to get ready?

  • Speech-Language Therapy Speech-Language Therapy

    Working with a certified speech-language pathologist can help a child with speech or language difficulties.

  • Spina Bifida Spina Bifida

    Spina bifida is a birth defect that involves the incomplete development of the spinal cord or its coverings. It's usually detected before a baby is born and treated right away.

  • Support for Parents of Kids With Special Needs Support for Parents of Kids With Special Needs

    You might have more on your plate than most parents, but it doesn't mean you have to do it all alone. Here's how to ask for help and avoid caregiver burnout.

  • Taking Care of You: Support for Caregivers Taking Care of You: Support for Caregivers

    It's common to put your own needs last when caring for a child you love. But to be the best you can be, you need to take care of yourself, too. Here are some tips to help you recharge.

  • When Your Baby Has a Birth Defect When Your Baby Has a Birth Defect

    If your child has a birth defect, you don't have to go it alone - many people and resources are available to help you.

  • When Your Baby's in the NICU When Your Baby's in the NICU

    The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may seem like a foreign place, but understanding what goes on there can help. Here's how to familiarize yourself with the NICU.

  • When Your Child's in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit When Your Child's in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    It can be stressful whenever kids are in the hospital — and even more so when they're admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). A basic understanding of the PICU can help you feel better prepared to help your child recover.

  • Balancing Academics and Serious Illness Balancing Academics and Serious Illness

    When your child has a serious or chronic illness, it's hard to think beyond the next treatment. But with planning and communication, you can help your child balance treatment and academics.

  • Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services

    Where you choose to give birth is an important decision. Is a hospital or a birth center right for you? Knowing the facts can help you make your decision.

  • Chemotherapy Chemotherapy

    Chemotherapy medications are used to treat cancer throughout the body by killing actively dividing cells. Learn more about chemo.

  • Electronic Health Records Electronic Health Records

    Many health institutions digitally store their patients' health information. Learn about electronic health records (EHRs) and how they can improve health care.

  • Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby

    Along with considering baby names and buying a crib, choosing the right health care provider should be on your to-do list when you're expecting.

  • Finding Your Way in the Health Care System Finding Your Way in the Health Care System

    It can be stressful when your child needs medical attention, and more so when you're worried about where to get that care and how much it will cost. Here are some basics on managing the health care system.

  • Going to the Emergency Room Going to the Emergency Room

    Knowing what to expect when you need to take your child to the emergency room can help make it a little less stressful.

  • How Can The Affordable Care Act Help Kids? How Can The Affordable Care Act Help Kids?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • How to Find Affordable Health Care How to Find Affordable Health Care

    Finding coverage for your kids may be difficult, but it's not impossible. Many kids are eligible for government or community programs, even if their parents work. Learn what resources are available to your family.

  • How to Shop for Health Insurance How to Shop for Health Insurance

    The government's healthcare marketplace, or exchange, is the new way to shop for health insurance. But just how do you find the best coverage and sign up? Get answers here.

  • Making Sense of Medical News Making Sense of Medical News

    Medical news can be baffling. How do you know what's important, accurate, and relevant to your family's health? There are some simple ways to evaluate what the news means to you.

  • Medical Care and Your 13- to 18-Year-Old Medical Care and Your 13- to 18-Year-Old

    Regular visits help your teen's doctor keep track of changes in physical, mental, and social development. The doctor can also help your teen understand the importance of choosing a healthy lifestyle.

  • Medical Care and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old Medical Care and Your 2- to 3-Year-Old

    Regular well-child exams are essential to keeping kids healthy and up-to-date with immunizations against dangerous diseases. Here's what to expect at the doctor's office.

  • Medical Care and Your 4- to 5-Year-Old Medical Care and Your 4- to 5-Year-Old

    Regular well-child exams are an important part of keeping kids healthy and up to date on immunizations against serious diseases. Find out what to expect at the doctor's office.

  • Medical Care and Your 6- to 12-Year-Old Medical Care and Your 6- to 12-Year-Old

    Regular well-child exams are essential to keep kids healthy and up-to-date with immunizations. Find out what to expect at the doctor's office.

  • Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor

    When kids know they're "going to the doctor," many become worried about the visit. Here's how to help them.

  • Radiation Therapy Radiation Therapy

    Radiation therapy, also called radiotherapy, irradiation, or X-ray therapy, is one of the most common forms of cancer treatment.

  • School-Based Health Centers School-Based Health Centers

    School-based health centers provide a range of services to meet kids' and teens' health care needs. Centers usually are inside a school building or right next door.

  • Talking to Your Child's Doctor Talking to Your Child's Doctor

    Building a relationship with your child's doctor requires communication and reasonable expectations.

  • Telemedicine Telemedicine

    Telemedicine - the practice of sending health information from one place to another - is changing health care. Find out how it can benefit you and your family.

  • The Medical Home The Medical Home

    A medical home is a new term in health care. But what does it mean? Find out what a medical home is and why your child needs one.

  • Transition of Care: Diabetes Transition of Care: Diabetes

    Most teens with diabetes should transition to an adult health care provider when they're between 18 and 21 years old. Here's how parents can help them do that.

  • What Is Interventional Radiology? What Is Interventional Radiology?

    Interventional radiology (or image-guided therapy) is a way for doctors to treat problems like vascular anomalies and tumors.

  • What's a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine? What's a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine?

    You might be surprised to learn that not all physicians have the letters MD after their names. Some have the letters DO (doctor of osteopathy).

  • What's a Nurse Practitioner? What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    What are nurse practitioners, and how do they differ from medical doctors?

  • What's a Primary Care Physician (PCP)? What's a Primary Care Physician (PCP)?

    PCPs are health care providers that offer routine checkups, vaccines, and non-emergency medical care. Learn more about PCPs and how to choose a great one.

  • When and Where to Get Medical Care When and Where to Get Medical Care

    Should you head to the ER when your child is hurt or ill? What about an urgent care center? Different problems need different levels of care, and you have many options.

  • When Your Child Outgrows Pediatric Care When Your Child Outgrows Pediatric Care

    Help your teen or young adult make the transition from pediatric health care to adult health care. Get tips on finding a new doctor and getting health insurance.

  • When Your Child's in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit When Your Child's in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    It can be stressful whenever kids are in the hospital — and even more so when they're admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). A basic understanding of the PICU can help you feel better prepared to help your child recover.

  • Who's Who in the Hospital Who's Who in the Hospital

    Parents are likely to be stressed when a child is hospitalized, and questions about the people providing medical care and what roles they play can add to the confusion. Our guide can help.

  • Appendectomy Appendectomy

    It's important to understand the ins and outs of an appendectomy so you know what to expect if your child undergoes this procedure.

  • Blood Transfusions Blood Transfusions

    A blood transfusion is a safe and relatively simple medical procedure that replaces blood lost during surgery or because of an injury or illness.

  • Cardiac Catheterization Cardiac Catheterization

    This minimally invasive procedure helps doctors perform diagnostic tests on the heart and even treat some heart conditions.

  • Cardiac Stents Cardiac Stents

    Cardiac stents are very small mesh wire tubes that hold blood vessels open so that blood can flow through the vessels normally. Find out about the procedure to place a stent.

  • Casts Casts

    Casts keep bones and other tissues in place while they heal. Here's what to expect, and how to care for casts.

  • Epilepsy Surgery Epilepsy Surgery

    Epilepsy surgery is an operation done on the brain to reduce or stop seizures.

  • External Fixator: Pin Care External Fixator: Pin Care

    External fixators used for limb lengthening have pins that go through the skin and into the bone. It's important to know how to care for the pins at home to prevent infections.

  • Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube) Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    Some kids have medical problems that prevent them from being able to take adequate nutrition by mouth. A gastrostomy tube (also called a G-tube) delivers nutrition directly to the stomach.

  • Laryngoscopy Laryngoscopy

    Laryngoscopy, a visual exam of the voicebox and airway, can help discover the causes of voice and breathing problems, throat or ear pain, and other bothersome symptoms.

  • Limb Lengthening Surgery: External Fixator Limb Lengthening Surgery: External Fixator

    Limb lengthening surgery is done when someone has a leg length discrepancy (one leg is shorter than the other). Sometimes this is treated with an external fixator.

  • Limb Lengthening Surgery: Internal Lengthening Device Limb Lengthening Surgery: Internal Lengthening Device

    Limb lengthening surgery is done when someone has a leg length discrepancy (one leg is shorter than the other). Sometimes this is treated with an internal lengthening device (a rod with a magnet).

  • Pectus Excavatum: The Nuss Procedure Pectus Excavatum: The Nuss Procedure

    The Nuss procedure is a surgery to correct severe pectus excavatum. It’s considered "minimally invasive" because only a few small incisions are needed.

  • Prenatal Test: Amniocentesis Prenatal Test: Amniocentesis

    This test takes a sample of the amniotic fluid. In the second trimester, it can show signs of chromosomal disorders, genetic problems, and neural tube defects. In the third trimester, it can check for infection and Rh incompatibility, and reveal if a baby's lungs are strong enough to breathe normall

  • Prenatal Test: Glucose Screening Prenatal Test: Glucose Screening

    Glucose screenings check for gestational diabetes, a short-term form of diabetes that some women develop during pregnancy.

  • Prenatal Test: Nonstress Test Prenatal Test: Nonstress Test

    This test checks to see if the baby responds normally to stimulation and is getting enough oxygen. It's done to check on the health of the fetus in a high-risk pregnancy or when the due date has passed.

  • Prenatal Test: Percutaneous Umbilical Blood Sampling (PUBS) Prenatal Test: Percutaneous Umbilical Blood Sampling (PUBS)

    This quick test examines fetal blood directly from the umbilical cord. It's used to detect disorders in the fetus.

  • Retinopathy of Prematurity Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Retinopathy of prematurity, which can happen in premature babies, causes abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina. Some children will need surgery to prevent vision loss or blindness.

  • Spinal Fusion Surgery Spinal Fusion Surgery

    A spinal fusion is a surgical procedure that's done to stabilize or straighten the bones in the back. It can help kids and teens with scoliosis.

  • The Ravitch Procedure The Ravitch Procedure

    The Ravitch procedure is a surgery to correct severe pectus carinatum and pectus excavatum.

  • What Is Interventional Radiology? What Is Interventional Radiology?

    Interventional radiology (or image-guided therapy) is a way for doctors to treat problems like vascular anomalies and tumors.

  • When Your Child Needs a Liver Transplant When Your Child Needs a Liver Transplant

    If your child needs a liver transplant, you're probably feeling lots of emotions. Fortunately, many kids who undergo liver transplants go on to live normal, healthy lives.

  • A Directory of Medical Tests A Directory of Medical Tests

    Sometimes, doctors need to order tests to evaluate a child's health or to understand what's causing an illness. Here are some common ones.

  • All About Genetics All About Genetics

    Read the basics about genetics, including how certain illnesses, or increased risks for certain illnesses, pass from generation to generation.

  • Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    A bone marrow aspiration and biopsy are performed to examine bone marrow, the spongy liquid part of the bone where blood cells are made.

  • Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) Test Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) Test

    An auditory brainstem response (ABR) test is a safe and painless test that gives health care providers information about possible hearing loss.

  • Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Basic Blood Chemistry Tests

    Doctors order basic blood chemistry tests to assess a wide range of conditions and the function of organs.

  • Biopsy Biopsy

    Doctors order biopsies to examine tissue or cells when they're concerned about a problem (such as an infection, inflammation, or cancer) in an organ.

  • Blood Culture Blood Culture

    A blood culture is a test that looks for germs (such as bacteria or fungi) in the blood.

  • Blood Test: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone Blood Test: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone

    The 17-hydroxyprogesterone test is mainly used to check for the most common form of the genetic disorder congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in infants and children.

  • Blood Test: Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT, or SGPT) Blood Test: Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT, or SGPT)

    An alanine aminotransferase (ALT) blood test is often part of an initial screening for liver disease.

  • Blood Test: Allergen-Specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) Blood Test: Allergen-Specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE)

    This blood test can check for some kinds of allergies.

  • Blood Test: Amylase Blood Test: Amylase

    An amylase test may be done if a child has signs of a problem with the pancreas, such as belly pain, nausea, or vomiting.

  • Blood Test: Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST, or SGOT) Blood Test: Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST, or SGOT)

    An aspartate aminotransferase (AST) blood test is often part of an initial screening for liver problems.

  • Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP)

    A basic metabolic panel (BMP), commonly ordered as part of routine medical exam, is a set of blood tests that gives information about sugar (glucose) and calcium levels, kidney function, and electrolyte and fluid balance.

  • Blood Test: Bilirubin Blood Test: Bilirubin

    Doctors may order bilirubin blood tests for infants or older kids if they see signs of the skin taking on the yellow discoloration known as jaundice.

  • Blood Test: C-Peptide Blood Test: C-Peptide

    A C-peptide test can help doctors tell the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It also can help find the cause of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia).

  • Blood Test: C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Blood Test: C-Reactive Protein (CRP)

    A C-reactive protein (CRP) blood test is used to identify inflammation or infection in the body.

  • Blood Test: Complete Blood Count Blood Test: Complete Blood Count

    The complete blood count (CBC) is the most common blood test. It analyzes red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

  • Blood Test: Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) Blood Test: Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

    A comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) blood test helps evaluate kidney and liver function, sugar (glucose) and protein levels in the blood, and electrolyte and fluid balance.

  • Blood Test: Dehydroepiandrosterone-Sulfate (DHEA-S) Blood Test: Dehydroepiandrosterone-Sulfate (DHEA-S)

    Doctors may order a DHEA-S test if boys or girls show signs of sexual development earlier than expected. It can rule out certain diseases of the testes or ovaries, or help diagnose damage or disease of the pituitary gland.

  • Blood Test: Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) Blood Test: Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR)

    An erythrocyte sedimentation rate test (ESR) detects inflammation that may be caused by infection and some autoimmune diseases.

  • Blood Test: Estradiol Blood Test: Estradiol

    Estradiol is the most important form of the hormone estrogen. Doctors may order an estradiol test if a girl appears to be entering puberty earlier or later than expected, or to evaluate menstrual problems.

  • Blood Test: Factor VIII Activity Blood Test: Factor VIII Activity

    A factor VIII activity blood test enables doctors to evaluate the functioning of a protein that helps blood to clot.

  • Blood Test: Ferritin (Iron) Blood Test: Ferritin (Iron)

    Doctors may order a ferritin test when they suspect kids have too little or too much iron in their bodies.

  • Blood Test: Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Blood Test: Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)

    Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) plays an important role in sexual development. An FSH test to measure the level of FSH in the bloodstream may be done if a boy or girl appears to be entering puberty earlier or later than expected.

  • Blood Test: Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase (GGT) Blood Test: Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase (GGT)

    Testing for GGT helps doctors look for problems with the liver or bile ducts.

  • Blood Test: Gliadin Antibodies Blood Test: Gliadin Antibodies

    The gliadin antibody test is used to help diagnose celiac disease or monitor its treatment.

  • Blood Test: Glucose Blood Test: Glucose

    The blood glucose test, which measures the amount of sugar in the blood, may be done as part of a routine physical or to help diagnose diabetes.

  • Blood Test: Hemoglobin Blood Test: Hemoglobin

    Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells. A hemoglobin test can be done as part of a routine checkup to screen for problems and or because a child isn't feeling well.

  • Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c

    Doctors use a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test to determine if your child's diabetes management plan needs to be adjusted.

  • Blood Test: Hemoglobin Electrophoresis Blood Test: Hemoglobin Electrophoresis

    A hemoglobin electrophoresis can help diagnose diseases involving abnormal hemoglobin production, and often is performed as part of newborn screening tests.

  • Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    Liver function tests can help doctors see if the liver has been damaged. They also can help diagnose infections and monitor medications that can cause liver-related side effects.

  • Blood Test: IGF Binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) Blood Test: IGF Binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3)

    The main reason doctors order the IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) test is to see if a person is producing a normal amount of human growth hormone.

  • Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

    Checking IgA levels can help doctors diagnose problems with the immune system, intestines, and kidneys. It's also used to evaluate autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and celiac disease.

  • Blood Test: Immunoglobulin E (IgE) Blood Test: Immunoglobulin E (IgE)

    The immunoglobulin E (IgE) blood test is often done as part of an initial screen for allergies. High IgE levels also may indicate a parasitic infection.

  • Blood Test: Immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM) Blood Test: Immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM)

    Evaluated together, immunoglobulins (antibodies in the blood) can give doctors important information about immune system functioning, especially relating to infection or autoimmune disease.

  • Blood Test: Insulin Blood Test: Insulin

    This test is often used to evaluate the cause of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) or any other conditions related to abnormal insulin production.

  • Blood Test: Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) Blood Test: Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH)

    Lactate dehydrogenase (also called lactic acid dehydrogenase, or LDH) is an enzyme found in almost all body tissues. The LDH test is generally used to screen for tissue damage.

  • Blood Test: Lead Blood Test: Lead

    In babies and young kids whose brains are still developing, even a small amount of lead can cause learning disabilities and behavioral problems. A lead test can determine the amount of lead in the blood.

  • Blood Test: Lipase Blood Test: Lipase

    A lipase test may be done if a child has signs of a problem with the pancreas, such as belly pain, nausea, or vomiting.

  • Blood Test: Lipid Panel Blood Test: Lipid Panel

    Results from a lipid panel enable your doctor to evaluate the levels of different kinds of fats in your child's blood.

  • Blood Test: Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Blood Test: Luteinizing Hormone (LH)

    A luteinizing hormone (LH) test measures the level of this hormone in the bloodstream. LH plays an important role in sexual development.

  • Blood Test: Magnesium Blood Test: Magnesium

    Doctors do this test to assess blood levels of magnesium, which helps the muscles and nerves function, the heart maintain normal rhythm, the bones stay strong, and the body process energy and make proteins.

  • Blood Test: Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) Blood Test: Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT)

    A partial thromboplastin time (PTT) test is used to evaluate blood's ability to clot. It may be done as part of an evaluation for a bleeding disorder or to monitor the effects of blood-thinning medicine.

  • Blood Test: Phosphorus Blood Test: Phosphorus

    Doctors may order a phosphorus blood test to help diagnose or monitor kidney disorders, calcium and bone problems, or other conditions.

  • Blood Test: Prolactin Blood Test: Prolactin

    A prolactin test can help diagnose prolactinoma, a usually benign tumor of the pituitary gland, irregular menstrual periods, thyroid or adrenal gland dysfunction, and other problems.

  • Blood Test: Prothrombin Time (PT) Blood Test: Prothrombin Time (PT)

    Doctors may order a PT test as part of an evaluation for a bleeding disorder or to monitor the effects of blood-thinning medicine.

  • Blood Test: Reticulocyte Count Blood Test: Reticulocyte Count

    This test measures the rate at which reticulocytes (immature red blood cells) are made in the bone marrow and enter the bloodstream. A reticulocyte count can provide information about a child's anemia.

  • Blood Test: Somatomedin C (IGF-1) Blood Test: Somatomedin C (IGF-1)

    A somatomedin C test usually is ordered to check for pituitary gland disorder and abnormalities in growth hormones production.

  • Blood Test: T3 Resin Uptake (T3RU) Blood Test: T3 Resin Uptake (T3RU)

    Doctors may order the T3 resin uptake when a child's symptoms or previous blood tests seem to suggest thyroid dysfunction.

  • Blood Test: T3 Total (Triiodothyronine) Blood Test: T3 Total (Triiodothyronine)

    The T3 total test is part of an evaluation of thyroid function. It's particularly useful in diagnosing hyperthyroidism, which can cause symptoms such as a fast heart rate, weight loss, trembling and sweating.

  • Blood Test: T4 (Thyroxine) Blood Test: T4 (Thyroxine)

    Doctors may order the T4 blood test if symptoms suggest any kind of thyroid disorder.

  • Blood Test: Testosterone Blood Test: Testosterone

    A testosterone blood test may be done if a boy appears to be entering puberty earlier or later than expected, or to check for damage or disease of the testes or ovaries, adrenal glands, or pituitary glands.

  • Blood Test: Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb) Blood Test: Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb)

    The thyroglobulin antibodies test is used to help diagnose autoimmune conditions involving the thyroid gland, or when thyroid disorders are suspected.

  • Blood Test: Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies Blood Test: Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies

    The thyroid peroxidase antibodies test is primarily used to help diagnose and monitor autoimmune conditions involving the thyroid gland, including Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves disease.

  • Blood Test: Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Blood Test: Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

    Doctors may order TSH blood tests to diagnose and monitor treatment of a thyroid disorder or evaluate pituitary gland functioning.

  • Blood Test: Tissue Transglutaminase IgA, IgG Blood Test: Tissue Transglutaminase IgA, IgG

    The tissue transglutaminase IgA, IgG test is usually done to help doctors diagnose celiac disease.

  • Blood Test: Uric Acid Blood Test: Uric Acid

    Doctors may order this test if they suspect high levels of uric acid in the bloodstream. Some kids with leukemia or other types of cancer can have high levels of uric acid (hyperuricemia).

  • Blood Test: Valproic Acid Blood Test: Valproic Acid

    Doctors may order a blood test for valproic acid, an anticonvulsant drug prescribed mainly to prevent seizures, to monitor how well the liver is processing the medication.

  • Blood Test: von Willebrand Factor (vWF) Activity - Ristocetin Cofactor Blood Test: von Willebrand Factor (vWF) Activity - Ristocetin Cofactor

    A von Willebrand factor (vWF) activity - ristocetin cofactor test lets doctors evaluate the functioning of a protein that helps blood to clot.

  • Blood Test: von Willebrand Factor (vWF) Antigen Blood Test: von Willebrand Factor (vWF) Antigen

    Doctors order the vWF antigen test to help diagnose or monitor the treatment of von Willebrand disease.

  • CAT Scan: Abdomen CAT Scan: Abdomen

    An abdominal CAT scan can detect inflammation, infection, injury or disease in the liver, spleen, kidneys, bladder, stomach, bowel, pancreas, adrenal glands, blood vessels, and lymph nodes.

  • CAT Scan: Chest CAT Scan: Chest

    A chest CAT scan is a painless test that uses a special X-ray machine to take black-and-white pictures of a patient's lungs, heart, blood vessels, airway passages, ribs and lymph nodes.

  • CAT Scan: Head CAT Scan: Head

    A head CAT scan is a painless test that uses a special X-ray machine to take pictures of a patient's brain, skull, and sinuses, as well as blood vessels in the head. It might be done to check for any number of conditions.

  • CAT Scan: Neck CAT Scan: Neck

    A neck CAT scan can detect signs of disease in the throat and surrounding areas. Doctors may order one to detect abscesses, birth defects, cysts, or tumors.

  • Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test

    Is your child scheduled to have a sweat test? Find out how this test is performed and how it's used to diagnose cystic fibrosis.

  • Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    Kids with cystic fibrosis (CF) often get lung and airway infections. A sputum CF respiratory screen or culture helps doctors detect, identify, and treat infection-causing bacteria or fungi.

  • ECG (Electrocardiogram) ECG (Electrocardiogram)

    Is your child scheduled to have an ECG? Find out how this test is performed and when you can expect the results.

  • Echocardiogram Echocardiogram

    An echocardiogram (also called an echo or cardiac ultrasound) uses sound waves to create pictures of the heart. It shows the structure of the heart and its parts and how well they’re working.

  • EEG (Electroencephalogram) EEG (Electroencephalogram)

    Is your child scheduled to have an EEG? Find out how this test is done and when you can expect the results.

  • EMG (Electromyogram) EMG (Electromyogram)

    Is your child scheduled to have an EMG? Find out how this test is performed and when you can expect the results.

  • Fetal Echocardiogram Fetal Echocardiogram

    A fetal echocardiogram (also called a fetal echo) uses sound waves to create pictures of an unborn baby's heart.

  • Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fetal MRI) Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fetal MRI)

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (also called a fetal MRI) uses a magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed pictures of an unborn baby.

  • Gene Therapy and Children Gene Therapy and Children

    Gene therapy carries the promise of cures for many diseases and for types of medical treatment most of us would not have thought possible.

  • Genetic Testing Genetic Testing

    Advances in genetic testing have improved doctors' ability to diagnose and treat certain illnesses.

  • Hearing Evaluation in Children Hearing Evaluation in Children

    Hearing problems can be overcome if they're caught early, so it's important to get your child's hearing screened early and checked regularly.

  • Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis) Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis)

    A joint aspiration (arthrocentesis) involves withdrawing (aspirating) a sample of fluid from a joint using a needle and syringe.

  • Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap)

    If your child is scheduled to have a lumbar puncture, also called a spinal tap, read about how this test is performed and when you can expect the results.

  • Newborn Screening Tests Newborn Screening Tests

    Newborn screening tests look for harmful or potentially fatal disorders that aren't apparent at birth. Find out which tests are done and which disorders they're designed to detect.

  • PET/MRI Scan PET/MRI Scan

    A PET/MRI scan is an imaging test that combines PET and MRI in one session. It creates very detailed pictures of the inside of the body.

  • Prenatal Genetic Counseling Prenatal Genetic Counseling

    Genetic counselors work with people who are either planning to have a baby or are pregnant to determine whether they carry the genes for certain inherited disorders. Find out more.

  • Prenatal Test: Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS) Prenatal Test: Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS)

    A chorionic villus sampling (CVS) checks cells from the placenta for chromosomal abnormalities. Most women whose pregnancies are not high-risk don't need this test.

  • Prenatal Test: Contraction Stress Test Prenatal Test: Contraction Stress Test

    A contraction stress test measures the fetal heart rate to ensure that a baby can handle contractions during labor.

  • Prenatal Test: First Trimester Screening Prenatal Test: First Trimester Screening

    The first trimester screening (or first trimester screen) includes a blood test and an ultrasound exam. It's done to see if a fetus is at risk for a chromosomal abnormality or birth defect.

  • Prenatal Test: Multiple Marker Test Prenatal Test: Multiple Marker Test

    The multiple marker test is a blood test done to screen for neural tube defects and chromosomal disorders.

  • Prenatal Test: Ultrasound Prenatal Test: Ultrasound

    A prenatal ultrasound is a safe and painless test that shows a baby's shape and position. It can be done in the first, second, or third trimester of pregnancy.

  • Prenatal Tests: FAQs Prenatal Tests: FAQs

    Every parent-to-be hopes for a healthy baby, but it can be hard not to worry. Find out what tests can keep you informed of your health — and your baby's — throughout pregnancy.

  • Prenatal Tests: First Trimester Prenatal Tests: First Trimester

    Find out what tests may be offered to you during the first trimester of pregnancy.

  • Prenatal Tests: Second Trimester Prenatal Tests: Second Trimester

    Find out what tests may be offered to you during weeks 13 through 26 of pregnancy.

  • Prenatal Tests: Third Trimester Prenatal Tests: Third Trimester

    Find out what tests may be offered to you during weeks 27 through 40 of pregnancy.

  • Pulse Oximetry (Pulse Ox) Pulse Oximetry (Pulse Ox)

    Pulse oximetry, a simple test that measures the amount of oxygen in the bloodstream, may give the first clue that there is a heart or lung problem.

  • Spirometry Spirometry

    Spirometry measures how much and how quickly someone breathes in and out. It can help diagnose and monitor diseases that make it hard to breathe.

  • Spirometry: Pre and Post Beta-Agonist Spirometry: Pre and Post Beta-Agonist

    This test measures the effectiveness of beta-agonist medications and gauges how well the lungs are working with and without the medication.

  • Stool Test: Bacteria Culture Stool Test: Bacteria Culture

    A stool culture helps doctors determine if there's a bacterial infection in the intestines.

  • Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin

    A doctor may request a C. difficile toxin stool test if your child has taken antibiotics in the past month or so and has had diarrhea for several days.

  • Stool Test: Fecal Blood Stool Test: Fecal Blood

    Stool samples can provide information about a problem in the GI system. To test the stool for the presence of blood, a noninvasive test - the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) - is performed.

  • Stool Test: Giardia Antigen Stool Test: Giardia Antigen

    This test may be done if a child has watery diarrhea, abdominal pain, large amounts of intestinal gas, appetite loss, and nausea or vomiting.

  • Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    A doctor may request an H. pylori antigen stool test if your child has symptoms that indicate a peptic ulcer, such as indigestion, abdominal pain, a full or bloated feeling, nausea, frequent belching, or vomiting.

  • Stool Test: Ova and Parasites (O&P) Stool Test: Ova and Parasites (O&P)

    This exam may be done if your child has diarrhea for an extended period, blood or mucus in the stool, abdominal pain, nausea, headaches, or fever.

  • Stool Tests Stool Tests

    Your child's doctor may order a stool collection test to check for blood, bacteria, ova, or parasites. Find out how this test is performed and when you can expect the results.

  • Strep Test: Rapid Strep Test: Rapid

    A rapid strep test is done to help quickly determine whether a sore throat is caused by a strep infection vs. other germs (usually viruses) that don't require antibiotic treatment.

  • Strep Test: Throat Culture Strep Test: Throat Culture

    Is your child having a strep test or a throat culture? Find out how these swab tests are performed.

  • Surgeries and Procedures: Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) Surgeries and Procedures: Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap)

    Find out how and why doctors perform lumbar punctures (spinal taps).

  • Ultrasound: Abdomen Ultrasound: Abdomen

    Doctors order abdominal ultrasounds when they're concerned about symptoms such as abdominal pain, repeated vomiting, abnormal liver or kidney function tests, or a swollen belly.

  • Ultrasound: Bladder Ultrasound: Bladder

    Doctors order bladder ultrasounds when there's a concern about bladder problems, such as difficulty urinating or daytime wetting.

  • Ultrasound: Head Ultrasound: Head

    Doctors order head ultrasounds when there's a concern about neurological problems in an infant.

  • Ultrasound: Infant Hip Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    Doctors order a hip ultrasound when they suspect a problem called developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH).

  • Ultrasound: Pelvis Ultrasound: Pelvis

    A pelvic ultrasound can detect tumors or cysts and help diagnose pelvic pain, some urinary problems, or abnormal menstrual bleeding.

  • Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder) Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder)

    A renal ultrasound makes images of your child's kidneys, ureters, and bladder. Doctors may order this test if they suspect kidney damage, cysts, tumors, kidney stones, or complications from urinary tract infections.

  • Ultrasound: Scrotum Ultrasound: Scrotum

    Doctors order a scrotal ultrasound when they're concerned about symptoms such as scrotal pain or swelling.

  • Urine Test: 24-Hour Analysis for Kidney Stones Urine Test: 24-Hour Analysis for Kidney Stones

    This test can show if certain substances are found at high concentrations in the urine, and might be causing kidney stones.

  • Urine Test: Automated Dipstick Urinalysis Urine Test: Automated Dipstick Urinalysis

    Automated dipstick urinalysis results may point to a urinary tract infection (UTI) or injury, kidney disease, or diabetes.

  • Urine Test: Calcium Urine Test: Calcium

    A urine calcium test can help monitor or determine the cause of kidney stones and other kidney diseases, or detect overactivity or underactivity in the parathyroid glands.

  • Urine Test: Creatinine Urine Test: Creatinine

    Low levels of creatinine in the urine may point to a kidney disease, certain muscular and neuromuscular disorders, or an obstruction of the urinary tract.

  • Urine Test: Dipstick Urine Test: Dipstick

    A urine dipstick test is often done as part of an overall urinalysis. The results of this test can help doctors diagnose a urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney disease, diabetes, or a urinary tract injury.

  • Urine Test: Microalbumin-to-Creatinine Ratio Urine Test: Microalbumin-to-Creatinine Ratio

    The microalbumin-to-creatinine ratio test is most commonly used to screen for kidney problems in teens with diabetes. It may also be used to monitor kidney function in kids and teens who have a kidney disease.

  • Urine Test: Microscopic Urinalysis Urine Test: Microscopic Urinalysis

    A microscopic urinalysis can help detect a urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney problems, diabetes, or a urinary tract injury.

  • Urine Test: Protein Urine Test: Protein

    The urine protein test is most commonly used to screen for kidney disease and also can help monitor kidney function.

  • Urine Test: Routine Culture Urine Test: Routine Culture

    A urine culture is used to diagnose a urinary tract infection (UTI) and determine what kinds of germs are causing it.

  • Urine Tests Urine Tests

    Is your child having a urine culture or urinalysis performed? Find out why urine tests are performed, and what to expect when the doctor orders them.

  • What Is Informed Consent? What Is Informed Consent?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • What Is the Multiple Marker Test? What Is the Multiple Marker Test?

    Expectant mothers usually are offered a blood test called the multiple marker test, sometimes called a triple screen or a quad screen. Find out what it measures.

  • Wound Drainage Culture Wound Drainage Culture

    Doctors order wound drainage cultures when they suspect wounds are infected.

  • X-Ray Exam: Abdomen X-Ray Exam: Abdomen

    An abdominal X-ray can help find the cause of many abdominal problems, such as pain, kidney stones, intestinal blockage, a hole in the intestine, or an abdominal mass such as a tumor.

  • X-Ray Exam: Ankle X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    An ankle X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as pain, tenderness, and swelling, or deformity of the ankle joint. It can also detect broken bones or a dislocated joint.

  • X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study

    A bone age study can help evaluate how a child's skeleton is maturing, which can help doctors diagnose conditions that delay or accelerate growth.

  • X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    This X-ray can, among other things, help find the cause of neck, shoulder, upper back, or arm pain. It's commonly done after someone has been in an automobile or other accident.

  • X-Ray Exam: Chest X-Ray Exam: Chest

    A chest X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses a small amount of radiation to take a picture of a person's chest, including the heart, lungs, diaphragm, lymph nodes, upper spine, ribs, collarbone, and breastbone.

  • X-Ray Exam: Elbow X-Ray Exam: Elbow

    An elbow X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as pain, tenderness, swelling, or a deformity. It can also help to detect broken bones or a dislocated joint.

  • X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    A femur X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as pain, limp, tenderness, swelling, or deformity of the upper leg. It can detect a broken bone, and after a broken bone has been set, it can help determine whether the bone is in alignment.

  • X-Ray Exam: Finger X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Doctors may order a finger X-ray to find the cause of symptoms such as pain, tenderness, or swelling, or to detect broken bones or dislocated joints.

  • X-Ray Exam: Foot X-Ray Exam: Foot

    A foot X-ray can help find the cause pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformities. It also can detect broken bones or dislocated joints.

  • X-Ray Exam: Forearm X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    A forearm X-ray can help find the causes of pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformity. It can detect broken bones, and after a broken bone has been set, help determine whether it has healed properly.

  • X-Ray Exam: Hand X-Ray Exam: Hand

    A hand X-ray can help find the cause of pain, tenderness, swelling, and deformity. It also can detect broken bones or dislocated joints.

  • X-Ray Exam: Hip X-Ray Exam: Hip

    A hip X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as limping, pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformity in the hip area. It can detect broken bones or a dislocated joint.

  • X-Ray Exam: Humerus (Upper Arm) X-Ray Exam: Humerus (Upper Arm)

    A humerus X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformity of the upper arm. It can detect a broken bone, and after the bone has been set, help determine whether it has healed properly.

  • X-Ray Exam: Knee X-Ray Exam: Knee

    A knee X-ray can help find the causes of pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformity of the knee, and detect broken bones or a dislocated joint.

  • X-Ray Exam: Leg Length X-Ray Exam: Leg Length

    Some kids may have significant differences in the length of their legs, a condition known as leg length discrepancy. This X-ray exam can help doctors determine the exact difference in leg length so they can decide on a treatment.

  • X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula) X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula)

    An X-ray of the tibia and fibula can help find the cause of pain, tenderness, swelling, or deformity of the lower leg. It can detect broken bones, and after a broken bone has been set, help determine if it has healed properly.

  • X-Ray Exam: Neck X-Ray Exam: Neck

    A neck X-ray can help diagnose many conditions, including stridor, croup, hoarseness due to swelling in or near the airways, and problems with tonsils and adenoids.

  • X-Ray Exam: Pelvis X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    A pelvis X-ray can help find the cause pain, swelling, or deformity in the pelvic, hip, or upper leg regions, and can detect broken bones.

  • X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis

    Kids with scoliosis have a spine that curves, like an S or a C. If scoliosis is suspected, a doctor may order X-rays to measure the curvature of the spine.

  • X-Ray Exam: Upper Gastrointestinal Tract (Upper GI) X-Ray Exam: Upper Gastrointestinal Tract (Upper GI)

    An upper GI X-ray can help find the cause of swallowing difficulties, unexplained vomiting, abdominal discomfort, severe indigestion, ulcers, reflux, hiatal hernia, or blockages.

  • X-Ray Exam: Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG) X-Ray Exam: Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG)

    A VCUG can help evaluate the bladder's size and shape, and look for abnormalities, such as a blockage. It can also show whether urine is moving in the right direction.

  • X-Ray Exam: Wrist X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that can help find the cause of pain, tenderness, swelling, or show deformities of the wrist joint. It can also detect broken bones or dislocated joints.

  • Your Child's Vision Your Child's Vision

    It's important for kids to have their eyes examined regularly, as many vision problems and eye diseases can be detected and treated early.

  • Your Daughter's First Gynecology Visit Your Daughter's First Gynecology Visit

    The idea of going to the gynecologist may make your daughter feel nervous. Here's how to make her feel more comfortable.

  • ADHD Medicines ADHD Medicines

    Medicine doesn’t cure ADHD. But it does help boost a child's ability to pay attention, slow down, and have more self-control. This article for parents has details on how ADHD medicines help.

  • Chemotherapy Chemotherapy

    Chemotherapy medications are used to treat cancer throughout the body by killing actively dividing cells. Learn more about chemo.

  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Alternative medicine includes herbal remedies, teas, supplements, and acupuncture. Learn what the risks are and whether alternative therapies can help your child.

  • Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations

    Immunizations have protected millions of children from potentially deadly diseases. Learn about immunizations and find out exactly what they do - and what they don't.

  • Giving Opioid Prescription Pain Medicine: What Parents Need to Know Giving Opioid Prescription Pain Medicine: What Parents Need to Know

    If your child’s health care provider prescribed a prescription pain medicine that contains an opioid, you probably have many questions about how to use it safely. Get answers here.

  • How to Safely Give Acetaminophen How to Safely Give Acetaminophen

    What kind? How much? How often? Find out how to give this pain and fever medicine.

  • How to Safely Give Ibuprofen How to Safely Give Ibuprofen

    What kind? How much? How often? Find out how to give this pain medicine.

  • Medications: Using Them Safely Medications: Using Them Safely

    Giving kids medicine safely can be a complicated task. With a little knowledge and a lot of double-checking, you can help treat your child's illness while you prevent dangerous reactions.

  • Pharmacogenomics Pharmacogenomics

    Pharmacogenomics is the science of understanding the role of genes in determining the response a person may have when given a drug.

  • Precision Medicine Precision Medicine

    Precision medicine is a new way to treat and prevent illnesses. It uses the differences in a person's genes, environment, and lifestyle to customize care.

  • Reye Syndrome Reye Syndrome

    Reye syndrome, an extremely rare but serious illness that can affect the brain and liver, occurs most commonly in kids recovering from a viral infection. Cases have dropped dramatically since the finding of a link between the illness and aspirin use in children.

  • Talking to the Pharmacist Talking to the Pharmacist

    If your child is sick, you'll probably have many questions to ask your doctor. But have you made a list of questions and concerns to share with your pharmacist?

  • Teaching Your Child How to Swallow Pills Teaching Your Child How to Swallow Pills

    Swallowing a pill is something that many of us take for granted. But just like any skill, learning to swallow a pill takes practice.

  • Circumcision Circumcision

    You have an important decision to make before you take your newborn son home: whether to circumcise him. Before deciding, talk to your doctor and consider the issues.

  • Cleft Lip and Palate Cleft Lip and Palate

    With this birth defect, tissues of the mouth or lip don't form properly when a baby is developing in the womb. The good news is that cleft lip and palate are treatable.

  • Cochlear Implants Cochlear Implants

    Sometimes called a "bionic ear," the cochlear implant can restore hearing for many kinds of hearing loss.

  • Enlarged Adenoids Enlarged Adenoids

    Often, tonsils and adenoids are surgically removed at the same time. Though some kids need surgery, enlarged adenoids are normal in others.

  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Gastroesophageal Reflux

    When symptoms of heartburn or acid indigestion happen a lot, it could be gastroesophageal reflux (GER). And it can be a problem for kids - even newborns.

  • Hernias Hernias

    Hernias are fairly common in kids and hernia repair is the one of the most common surgeries performed on children.

  • Intussusception Intussusception

    This bowel problem is the most common cause of bowel blockages in very young children. With timely treatment, kids recover quickly.

  • Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery

    Many kids get middle ear infections (otitis media). Doctors may suggest ear tube surgery for those with multiple infections or a hearing loss or speech delay.

  • Stem Cell Transplants Stem Cell Transplants

    Stem cells help rebuild a weakened immune system. Stem cell transplants are effective treatments for a wide range of diseases, including cancer.

  • Tear-Duct Obstruction and Surgery Tear-Duct Obstruction and Surgery

    Blocked tear ducts are a fairly common problem in infants. The earlier they're discovered, the less likely it is that infection will result or surgery will be necessary.

  • Tonsils and Tonsillectomies Tonsils and Tonsillectomies

    Not everyone knows what tonsils do or why they may need to be removed. Knowing the facts can help alleviate the fears of both parents and kids facing a tonsillectomy.

  • What Is "Minimally Invasive" Surgery? What Is "Minimally Invasive" Surgery?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • What Is Informed Consent? What Is Informed Consent?

    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • When Your Child Needs a Heart Transplant When Your Child Needs a Heart Transplant

    If your child needs a heart transplant, you're probably feeling lots of emotions. Fortunately, many kids who undergo heart transplants go on to live normal, healthy lives.

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