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Pregnancy & Newborn Center Content List

  • A Week-by-Week Pregnancy Calendar A Week-by-Week Pregnancy Calendar

    Our week-by-week illustrated pregnancy calendar is a detailed guide to all the changes taking place in your baby - and in you!

  • Pregnancy Slideshow (Baby) Pregnancy Slideshow (Baby)

    This week‑by‑week pregnancy calendar shows you some of the important developments taking place as your baby grows.

  • Pregnancy Slideshow (Mom & Baby) Pregnancy Slideshow (Mom & Baby)

    Here's a peek at what's going on inside your body during the amazing 40 weeks of pregnancy. Watch your belly — and your baby — grow!

  • Week 1 Week 1

    Week 1 is actually your menstrual period, but because your due date is calculated from the first day of your last period, it counts as part of your 40-week pregnancy.

  • Week 10 Week 10

    At this point in the pregnancy, all vital organs have been formed and are starting to work together. Congenital abnormalities are unlikely to develop after week 10.

  • Week 11 Week 11

    If you saw a picture of your baby now, you'd think you had a genius on your hands — the baby's head accounts for about half of the body length!

  • Week 12 Week 12

    Tiny fingernails and toenails start to form this week, which is the last of your first trimester.

  • Week 13 Week 13

    As you begin the second trimester, your baby may be able to put a thumb in his or her mouth although the sucking muscles aren't completely developed yet.

  • Week 14 Week 14

    Some fine hairs, called lanugo, have developed on your baby's face. This soft colorless hair protects the skin and will eventually cover most of your baby's body until it is shed just before delivery.

  • Week 15 Week 15

    Muscle development continues, and your baby is probably making lots of movements with his or her head, mouth, arms, wrists, hands, legs, and feet.

  • Week 16 Week 16

    Your baby can hold his or her head erect, and facial muscles now allow for a variety of expressions, such as squinting and frowning.

  • Week 17 Week 17

    Your baby is still very tiny at about 5.1 inches from crown to rump this week.

  • Week 18 Week 18

    Your baby's bones had been developing but were still soft. This week, they begin to harden, or ossify.

  • Week 19 Week 19

    A waxy substance called vernix caseosa is covering your baby to help protect the delicate skin from becoming chapped or scratched.

  • Week 2 Week 2

    Week 2 is the midpoint of a typical menstrual cycle, when ovulation occurs and conditions are most favorable for fertilization of an egg by sperm.

  • Week 20 Week 20

    You're now halfway through your pregnancy and possibly feeling your baby's first movements, which may begin between weeks 18 and 20.

  • Week 21 Week 21

    Your baby's intestines are developed enough that small amounts of sugars are absorbed from the fluid your baby swallows and passed through the digestive system to the large bowel.

  • Week 22 Week 22

    Brain and nerve endings are formed enough so that the fetus can feel touch, while you might be feeling irregular, painless Braxton Hicks contractions.

  • Week 23 Week 23

    You may feel more forceful movements — your baby's daily workout routine includes moving the muscles in the fingers, toes, arms, and legs.

  • Week 24 Week 24

    Your baby's inner ear has developed enough that your baby can know when he or she is upside down or right side up in your belly.

  • Week 25 Week 25

    You may notice that your baby has resting and alert periods. Your baby's hearing has continued to develop, too — he or she may now be able to hear your voice!

  • Week 26 Week 26

    Your baby now weighs a little less than 2 pounds and will gain weight steadily until birth.

  • Week 27 Week 27

    This first week of the third trimester, your baby looks similar to what he or she will look like at birth - just smaller and thinner.

  • Week 28 Week 28

    Your health care provider may tell you whether your baby is headfirst or feet- or bottom-first (called breech position). Don't worry if your baby is in the breech position right now — most babies will switch positions on their own.

  • Week 29 Week 29

    Your active baby's first few flutters of movement have given way to hard jabs and kicks that may take your breath away.

  • Week 3 Week 3

    During this week, the rapidly dividing fertilized egg will implant itself in the uterus, at the site that eventually will become the placenta.

  • Week 30 Week 30

    Your baby continues to gain weight and layers of fat that will provide warmth after birth.

  • Week 31 Week 31

    By now, the milk glands in your breasts may have started to make colostrum, the milk that will feed the baby in the first few days if you decide to breastfeed.

  • Week 32 Week 32

    At this stage in the pregnancy, your baby's hair is developing, in the form of eyelashes, eyebrows, and on your baby's head.

  • Week 33 Week 33

    Like a newborn, your baby sleeps much of the time and even has REM sleep, the stage when our most vivid dreams happen.

  • Week 34 Week 34

    Your baby is probably in position for delivery — your health care provider can tell you if your baby is positioned head- or bottom-first.

  • Week 35 Week 35

    Because of increasing size, your baby is now cramped and restricted inside the uterus. Fetal movements may decrease, but feel stronger and more forceful.

  • Week 36 Week 36

    At this point, your appetite may return because the baby has dropped down into your pelvis, and is no longer putting as much pressure on your stomach and intestines.

  • Week 37 Week 37

    This week, your baby continues to gain weight — at half an ounce a day!

  • Week 38 Week 38

    At this point, you may be taking frequent trips to the bathroom. That's because your baby is engaged in your pelvis, so your bladder is extremely compressed.

  • Week 39 Week 39

    Braxton Hicks contractions (also called "false labor") may become more pronounced, and your water may break.

  • Week 4 Week 4

    During this week, your baby, or embryo, has two layers of cells that will develop into organs and body parts.

  • Week 40 Week 40

    Your baby is here! Or maybe not — most women, especially first-time moms, don't deliver on their estimated due dates.

  • Week 5 Week 5

    This week, the embryo begins to form a distinct shape that includes the neural tube, which will become the spinal cord and brain.

  • Week 6 Week 6

    Your baby's heart will begin to beat around this time, and the beginnings of the digestive and respiratory systems are forming, as are small buds that will grow into arms and legs.

  • Week 7 Week 7

    The umbilical cord has formed, and the mouth, nostrils, ears, and eyes are some of the facial features that become more defined this week. The arm bud now has a hand on the end of it, which looks like a tiny paddle.

  • Week 8 Week 8

    Around this time, symptoms such as a missed period, nausea, extreme fatigue, or tight clothes may make the reality of pregnancy hit home.

  • Week 9 Week 9

    Your baby measures about 0.6 to 0.7 inches from crown to rump and weighs around 0.1 ounces. Your baby may make some first movements as muscles develop, but you won't feel them for several more weeks.

  • Are You in Labor? Are You in Labor?

    Here's how to tell the difference between true labor and false labor -- and when to get medical care.

  • Birth Plans Birth Plans

    The reality of labor and birth may seem extremely far off - but now's the time to start planning for your baby by creating a birth plan that details your wishes.

  • Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services

    Where you choose to give birth is an important decision. Is a hospital or a birth center right for you? Knowing the facts can help you make your decision.

  • Cesarean Sections (C-Sections) Cesarean Sections (C-Sections)

    Many babies are delivered via cesarean sections. Learn why and how C-sections are done.

  • Choking Choking

    Choking is an emergency - so it's important to recognize the signs of choking and know what to do if happens.

  • Cord Blood Banking Cord Blood Banking

    Should you bank your newborn's cord blood? This article can help you decide.

  • Dealing With Pain During Childbirth Dealing With Pain During Childbirth

    Learning all you can about childbirth pain is one of the best ways to help you deal with it when the time comes.

  • Epidurals Epidurals

    Epidurals can make giving birth more calm, controlled, and comfortable. Find out more.

  • Inducing Labor Inducing Labor

    Find out why doctors may induce labor if you're past your due date, how it may be done, and how it may affect you and your baby.

  • Looking at Your Newborn: What's Normal Looking at Your Newborn: What's Normal

    When you first meet your newborn, you may be surprised by what you see. Here's what to expect.

  • Natural Childbirth Natural Childbirth

    Some women choose to give birth using no medications at all, relying instead on relaxation techniques and controlled breathing for pain. Get more information on natural childbirth.

  • Newborn Brachial Plexus Injuries Newborn Brachial Plexus Injuries

    During childbirth, a brachial plexus injury can happen if the baby's neck is stretched to one side.

  • Recovering From Delivery Recovering From Delivery

    After giving birth, you'll notice you've changed somewhat - both physically and emotionally. Here's what to expect after labor and delivery.

  • The First Day of Life The First Day of Life

    Your baby's here! Find out what to expect on that special day first day of life.

  • Treatments to Prevent Premature Birth Treatments to Prevent Premature Birth

    Some women are more likely than others to go into labor early. Find out what doctors can do to help prevent or delay early labor.

  • Why Are Babies Born Early? Why Are Babies Born Early?

    Many things can cause a baby to be born early or with health problems. Some of these things can be controlled, but others can’t. Find out what you can do to have a healthy pregnancy.

  • A to Z: Colic A to Z: Colic

    Colic is defined as crying for more than 3 hours a day, for more than 3 days a week, for at least 3 weeks.

  • A to Z: Failure to Thrive A to Z: Failure to Thrive

    Failure to thrive refers to a child's inability to gain weight and grow as expected for kids of the same age and gender. Most diagnoses are made in the first few years of life.

  • Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby Syndrome) Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby Syndrome)

    Abusive head trauma is the leading cause of death in child abuse cases in the United States. It happens when someone shakes an infant.

  • Apnea of Prematurity Apnea of Prematurity

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is a condition in which premature infants stop breathing for 15 to 20 seconds during sleep. AOP usually goes away on its own as a baby matures.

  • Birth Defects Birth Defects

    Some birth defects are minor and cause no problems; others cause major disabilities. Learn about the different types of birth defects, and how to help prevent them.

  • Birthmarks Birthmarks

    Birthmarks that babies are born with, or develop soon after birth, are mostly harmless and many even go away on their own, but sometimes they're associated with certain health problems.

  • Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD) Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD)

    Babies who are born prematurely or who experience respiratory problems shortly after birth are at risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), sometimes called chronic lung disease.

  • Cleft Lip Cleft Lip

    A cleft lip is when a baby's lip doesn't form properly during pregnancy. Most kids can have surgery to repair one early in life.

  • Cleft Palate Cleft Palate

    A cleft palate is when a baby is born with a cleft (gap) in the roof of the mouth. Most kids can have surgery to repair them early in life.

  • Cleft Palate With Cleft Lip Cleft Palate With Cleft Lip

    A cleft palate with a cleft lip is when a baby's lip and palate (roof of mouth) don't form properly during pregnancy. Most kids with cleft lip and palate are treated successfully with no lasting problems.

  • Colic Colic

    Colic is common in babies - but that doesn't make it easier for parents to handle. Learn what colic is, what causes it, and what you can do about it.

  • Common Diagnoses in the NICU Common Diagnoses in the NICU

    Learn about common NICU conditions, what causes them, how they're diagnosed, how they're treated, and how long babies might stay in the unit.

  • Congenital Cataracts Congenital Cataracts

    A baby with congenital cataracts has clouding in one or both eyes. Doctors do surgery to treat them.

  • Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Defects

    Heart defects happen when there's a problem with a baby's heart development during pregnancy. Most heart defects can be treated during infancy.

  • Congenital Hypothyroidism Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Some babies are born with a thyroid gland that didn't develop correctly or doesn't work as it should. This is called congenital hypothyroidism.

  • Constipation Constipation

    Constipation is a very common problem among kids, and it usually occurs because a child's diet doesn't include enough fluids and fiber. In most cases, simple changes can help kids go.

  • Cradle Cap (Seborrheic Dermatitis) in Infants Cradle Cap (Seborrheic Dermatitis) in Infants

    This harmless condition - the infant form of dandruff - causes rough, scaly patches on a baby's skin.

  • Craniosynostosis Craniosynostosis

    Craniosynostosis is when seams between bones in the skull close too soon. When this happens, the skull can’t expand grow as it should, and it develops an unusual shape.

  • Diaper Rash Diaper Rash

    Diaper rash is a very common infection that can cause a baby's skin to become sore, red, scaly, and tender. In most cases, it clears up with simple changes in diapering.

  • Double Outlet Right Ventricle (DORV) Double Outlet Right Ventricle (DORV)

    Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a heart defect where the aorta connects to the heart in the wrong place.

  • Ebstein Anomaly Ebstein Anomaly

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare heart defect that affects the tricuspid valve. It can cause problems that range from very mild to very serious.

  • Egg Allergy Egg Allergy

    Helping your child manage an egg allergy means reading food labels carefully, being aware of what he or she eats, and carrying the right medicines in case of an allergic reaction.

  • Erythema Toxicum Erythema Toxicum

    Erythema toxicum is a common rash seen in full-term newborns. No treatment is needed and it goes away on its own.

  • Failure to Thrive Failure to Thrive

    Most kids grow well but some have ”failure to thrive.” This means they don't gain weight as expected and may not grow as tall as they should.

  • Febrile Seizures Febrile Seizures

    Febrile seizures are full-body convulsions caused by high fevers that affect young kids. Although they can be frightening, they usually stop on their own and don't cause any other health problems.

  • Fetal Abdominal Cyst Fetal Abdominal Cyst

    A fetal abdominal cyst is a bubble of fluid in a balloon-like bag in the belly of an unborn baby.

  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    If a woman drinks alcohol during her pregnancy, her baby could be born with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), which causes a wide range of physical, behavioral, and learning problems.

  • Fetal Lung Mass Fetal Lung Mass

    A fetal lung mass is an unusual lump that grows inside or next to an unborn baby’s lung. Some are treated before birth, while others are removed after the baby is born.

  • Fibular Hemimelia Fibular Hemimelia

    Babies who have fibular hemimelia are born with a short or missing fibula. Experts who treat bone problems have several options to help kids with a hemimelia.

  • Flat Head Syndrome (Positional Plagiocephaly) Flat Head Syndrome (Positional Plagiocephaly)

    Babies can develop a flat spot on the back of their heads, usually from sleeping in the same position too long. Alternating your baby's sleep position and providing lots of "tummy time" can help.

  • Galactosemia Galactosemia

    Some babies are born with the metabolic disorder glactosemia. They must drink soy-based formula instead of breast milk or a cow's milk-based formula.

  • Gastroschisis Gastroschisis

    Gastroschisis is when a baby is born with the intestines, and sometimes other organs, sticking out through a hole in the belly wall near the umbilical cord.

  • Hemangiomas: Suzanne's Story Hemangiomas: Suzanne's Story

    When Anna was born, she developed red spots that her parents learned were hemangiomas, benign birthmarks that she eventually outgrew. Her mother tells her story.

  • Hernias Hernias

    Hernias are fairly common in kids, and hernia repair is one of the most common pediatric surgeries.

  • Hypospadias Hypospadias

    Hypospadias is when the urethra — the tube that drains pee from the bladder to outside the body — opens in a different place instead of at the tip of the penis.

  • Infant Torticollis Infant Torticollis

    Babies with this condition have trouble turning their heads, due to muscle tightness. Simple stretching exercises and physical therapy can help babies get better.

  • Interrupted Aortic Arch (IAA) Interrupted Aortic Arch (IAA)

    An interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare heart condition in which the aorta doesn’t form completely. Surgery must be done within the first few days of a baby’s life to close the gap in the aorta.

  • Intestinal Malrotation Intestinal Malrotation

    Malrotation is a type of obstruction caused by abnormal development of the intestines while a fetus is in the womb. Find out more about this condition and the complications it can cause.

  • Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR)

    Intrauterine growth restriction is when a baby in the womb doesn't grow at the expected rate during the pregnancy. Women with IUGR should eat a healthy diet; get enough sleep; and avoid alcohol, drugs, and tobacco.

  • Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Newborns Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Newborns

    An intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is bleeding in and around the brain’s ventricles. Most babies with a mild IVH do well.

  • Intussusception Intussusception

    Intussusception is the most common cause of bowel blockages in very young children. Quick treatment can help them recover without lasting problems.

  • Jaundice in Newborns Jaundice in Newborns

    Jaundice is when a baby has yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes. Most types of jaundice go away on their own.

  • Laryngomalacia Laryngomalacia

    Laryngomalacia is a common cause of noisy breathing in infants.

  • Lead Poisoning Lead Poisoning

    Long-term exposure to lead can cause serious health problems, particularly in young kids, so it's important to find out whether your child might be at risk for lead exposure.

  • Meconium Aspiration Syndrome (MAS) Meconium Aspiration Syndrome (MAS)

    Meconium aspiration can happen before, during, or after labor and delivery when a newborn inhales a mixture of meconium and amniotic fluid. Although it can be serious, most cases are not.

  • Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    You probably have lots of questions about your baby's health. When should you call the doctor, and what medical care should you expect for your baby at this age?

  • Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    Because your baby begins to show his or her personality during these months, your questions may move from simple sleeping and eating concerns to those about physical and social development.

  • Milk Allergy in Infants Milk Allergy in Infants

    Almost all infants are fussy at times. But some are very fussy because they have an allergy to the protein in cow's milk, which is the basis for most commercial baby formulas.

  • Myelomeningocele Myelomeningocele

    Myelomeningocele is a type of spina bifida in which a baby is born with a gap in the bones of the spine.

  • Necrotizing Enterocolitis Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is an intestinal disease that usually affects preemies. Medicines and therapy can help babies with NEC.

  • Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS)

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is when a baby has withdrawal from a medicine or drug the mom took while she was pregnant.

  • Newborn Brachial Plexus Injuries Newborn Brachial Plexus Injuries

    During childbirth, a brachial plexus injury can happen if the baby's neck is stretched to one side.

  • Nut and Peanut Allergy Nut and Peanut Allergy

    If your child is allergic to nuts or peanuts, it's essential to learn what foods might contain them and how to avoid them.

  • Omphalocele Omphalocele

    A baby born with an omphalocele has an opening where the umbilical cord goes into the belly. Some openings close on their own, but many need treatment, including surgery.

  • Oral Thrush Oral Thrush

    Oral thrush, a very common infection in infants that causes irritation in and around the baby's mouth, often goes away on its own without medical treatment.

  • Orofacial Clefts Orofacial Clefts

    With this birth defect, tissues of the mouth or lip don't form properly when a baby is developing in the womb. The good news is that cleft lip and palate are treatable.

  • Orofacial Clefts Orofacial Clefts

    A cleft is when tissues of the mouth or lip don't form properly when a baby is developing in the womb. The good news is that orofacial clefts are treatable.

  • Phenylketonuria (PKU) Phenylketonuria (PKU)

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a metabolic disorder caused by a defect in the enzyme that breaks down an amino acid. PKU is treatable when it is found early.

  • Port-Wine Stains Port-Wine Stains

    For most kids, these birthmarks are no big deal — they're just part of who they are. Read about port-wine stains, how to care for them, and, if necessary, what treatments are available.

  • Pyloric Stenosis Pyloric Stenosis

    Pyloric stenosis can make a baby vomit forcefully and often. It can lead to serious problems like dehydration, and needs medical treatment right away.

  • Questions to Ask When Your Baby's in the NICU Questions to Ask When Your Baby's in the NICU

    Having a newborn in the NICU can be a stressful time. Often, parents forget to ask important questions. This list can help you prepare for the next time you talk to your baby's care team.

  • Retinopathy of Prematurity Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Retinopathy of prematurity, which can happen in premature babies, causes abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina. Some children will need surgery to prevent vision loss or blindness.

  • Sepsis Sepsis

    Sepsis is a serious infection usually caused when bacteria make toxins that cause the immune system to attack the body's own organs and tissues.

  • Spina Bifida Spina Bifida

    Spina bifida is a birth defect that involves the incomplete development of the spinal cord or its coverings. It's usually detected before a baby is born and treated right away.

  • Spina Bifida Occulta Spina Bifida Occulta

    In spina bifida occulta, a baby is born with a gap in the spine's bones, but the spinal cord and its covering do not push through it.

  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

    SIDS is the leading cause of death among infants 1 month to 1 year old. Though SIDS remains unpredictable, you can help reduce your infant's risk.

  • Tay-Sachs Disease Tay-Sachs Disease

    A baby with Tay-Sachs disease is born without an important enzyme, so fatty proteins build up in the brain, hurting the baby's sight, hearing, movement, and mental development.

  • Teething Tots Teething Tots

    Teething can be a tough time for babies and parents. Here are the facts on teething, including tips for baby teeth hygiene and relieving pain.

  • Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn (TTN) Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn (TTN)

    For some newborns, the first few breaths of life may be faster and more labored than normal because of a lung condition called transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN).

  • Umbilical Hernias Umbilical Hernias

    An umbilical hernia shows up as a bump under the belly button. If a hernia doesn't go away by age 4 or 5 or causes problems, doctors may recommend surgery.

  • Undescended Testicles Undescended Testicles

    Shortly before birth, a boy's testicles usually descend into the scrotum. When a testicle doesn't make the move, this is called cryptorchidism, or undescended testicles.

  • When Your Baby Has a Birth Defect When Your Baby Has a Birth Defect

    If your child has a birth defect, you don't have to go it alone - many people and resources are available to help you.

  • When Your Baby’s Born Premature When Your Baby’s Born Premature

    Premature infants, known as preemies, come into the world earlier than full-term infants. They have many special needs that make their care different from other babies.

  • When Your Baby’s in the NICU When Your Baby’s in the NICU

    Learn what a NICU visit will be like for your little one, what you can do to help, and how to find support for yourself.

  • 5-Minute Rice and Beans 5-Minute Rice and Beans

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Apple-Walnut Bake Apple-Walnut Bake

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Artichoke and Mushroom Pizza Artichoke and Mushroom Pizza

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Berry French Toast Berry French Toast

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Berry Smoothie Berry Smoothie

    This recipe is ideal for kids who need a gluten-free diet.

  • Black Bean Burrito Black Bean Burrito

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Breaded Chicken With Asparagus Breaded Chicken With Asparagus

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Candied Sweet Potato Candied Sweet Potato

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Carrot-Ginger Soup Carrot-Ginger Soup

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Chicken-Apple Salad Chicken-Apple Salad

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Chocolate-Avocado Pudding Chocolate-Avocado Pudding

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Denver Omelet Sandwich Denver Omelet Sandwich

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Easy Cheesy Chicken Melt Easy Cheesy Chicken Melt

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Garlic-Rosemary Oven Fries Garlic-Rosemary Oven Fries

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Mashed Potatoes Mashed Potatoes

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Melon-Cucumber Smoothie Melon-Cucumber Smoothie

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You Need Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You Need

    Learn which nutrients you need while pregnant or breastfeeding, and easy ways to add them to your diet.

  • Spaghetti With Chicken, Tomato, and Mushrooms Spaghetti With Chicken, Tomato, and Mushrooms

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Spinach Salad Spinach Salad

    This recipe is especially for kids with lactose intolerance, who need to limit or avoid dairy products.

  • Spinach, Pear, and Gruyère Salad Spinach, Pear, and Gruyère Salad

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Sweet Potato Oven Fries Sweet Potato Oven Fries

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Sweet Spinach Salad Sweet Spinach Salad

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Teriyaki Turkey Burger Teriyaki Turkey Burger

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Tropical Smoothie Tropical Smoothie

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Turkey Garden Lasagna Turkey Garden Lasagna

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Veggie Mac & Cheese Veggie Mac & Cheese

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

  • Yogurt Parfait Yogurt Parfait

    This recipe is especially for pregnant and breastfeeding women, but it can be a nutritious part of almost anyone's diet.

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